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me that he fired a fifty-pound rifle-shot through the boilers of the third of the enemy's gunboats, of the western line, and rendered her for the time being helpless. The action lasted during the better part of an hour, and took place at the closest quarters. The enemy finally retreated with haste below the guns of Fort Pillow. I have to call the especial attention of the Department to the gallantry and good conduct exhibited by Commanders Stembel and Kilty, and Lieut. Commanding S. L. Phelps. I regret to say that Commander Stembel, Fourth Master Reynolds, and one of the seamen of the Cincinnati and one of the Mound City were severely wounded. The other accidents of the day were slight. I have the honor to be, Your most obedient servant, C. H. Davis, Captain Commanding Mississippi Flotilla, pro tern. Commander Pennock's despatch. Cairo, May 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: News from the fleet is just received. The Mound City was injure
urn of the river. By half-past 7 the clouds had obscured the dipping sun; the illumination from the burning fort was grand. A grand and spreading column of smoke towered above the bluffs, while the leaping flames could be seen above the woods in two and sometimes three places. Several slight explosions took place during the fire. The conflagration lasted an hour and a half, when all relapsed into the original gloom. It was clear enough to see that the enemy were evacuating the fort. Capt. Phelps meanwhile went down to the foot of Flour Island in a tug and watched the operation at the distance of a mile and a half. He was, of course, satisfied of the evacuation, and determined upon landing early in the morning. Thursday, June 5. Early this morning the fleet got under way, and by sunrise our flag was waving from the heights of Fort Pillow. The rams under Col. Ellet, anxious, probably, to secure an equivocal notoriety in being the first to land in an abandoned fortress, procee
essels ; the flag-ship Benton, Lieut. Commanding S. L. Phelps; the Louisville, Commander B. M. Dove; the Caron Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding Ram-Fleet. Captain Phelps's letter. United States flag steamer Bentoonor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant. S. L. Phelps, Lieutenant Commanding Benton, and Acting ”Fleetut. Bishop says: There's the Stars and Stripes. Capt. Phelps--There's a wharf-boat they have left. See --loon flames proves our information correct. Here Lieut. Phelps elevates his martin-box aft Our officers and menounds down. The Commodore observes: Fire again, Capt. Phelps, bring her to. Accordingly the Benton lets slip How is the water? Can we anchor here? says Capt. Phelps to pilot Dan Duffy. Yes, sir, he replied, there'plenty of water. Then round the Benton to, says Capt. Phelps, when pilot Duffy gives her the wheel, bringing gunboat Benton, (flag-ship of Commodore Davis,) Captain Phelps commanding; she mounts fourteen guns; gunboat S
sion at this time consisted of Doubleday's, Patrick's, and Phelps's (late Hatch's) brigades, General Gibbon having been detaPatrick's two remaining regiments; these to be followed by Phelps's brigade two hundred paces in the rear, and this in turn enty-third New-York, Col. Hoffman. By Gen. Hatch's order, Phelps's brigade advanced in column of divisions at half distancerigade deployed in turn and advanced in line of battle. Col. Phelps's brigade, owing to an accidental opening, proceeded foroods and backed by a corn-field full of rocky ledges. Col. Phelps now ordered his men to advance, and Gen. Hatch rode throeut.-Col. Hoffman, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania volunteers. Phelps's brigade being few in number and having suffered severelyxperience and cool bravery were never better attested; Colonel Phelps, commanding Hatch's brigade, and Col. Wainwright and L Fifteenth, and Thirty-ninth New-York, Garibaldi Guard, Capt. Phelps's New-York and Fifteenth Indiana batteries, and two sec
The division at this time consisted of Doubleday's, Patrick's, and Phelps's (late Hatch's) brigades, General Gibbon having been detached withorted by Patrick's two remaining regiments; these to be followed by Phelps's brigade two hundred paces in the rear, and this in turn by Doubleth the Twenty-third New-York, Col. Hoffman. By Gen. Hatch's order, Phelps's brigade advanced in column of divisions at half distance, preserv, each brigade deployed in turn and advanced in line of battle. Col. Phelps's brigade, owing to an accidental opening, proceeded for a whileted by woods and backed by a corn-field full of rocky ledges. Col. Phelps now ordered his men to advance, and Gen. Hatch rode through the d upon Lieut.-Col. Hoffman, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania volunteers. Phelps's brigade being few in number and having suffered severely, I reliese long experience and cool bravery were never better attested; Colonel Phelps, commanding Hatch's brigade, and Col. Wainwright and Lieut.-Col
in the graveyard, half-way up the hill, and behind the first line of intrenchments, to open on Loudon and Maryland Heights. They continued shelling them for several hours. The line of battle was formed on the breastworks behind the Bolivar Heights, nearly as it had been the day before, namely, Col. D'Utassy occupied the extreme right with his brigade, consisting of the Sixty-fifth Illinois, One Hundred and Eleventh, One Hundred and Fifteenth, and Thirty-ninth New-York, Garibaldi Guard, Capt. Phelps's New-York and Fifteenth Indiana batteries, and two sections of the Fifth New-York artillery. Col. Trimble's brigade, consisting of the Thirty-second and Sixtieth Ohio, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New-York, detachments of the Third Maryland home brigade, Ninth Vermont, (deployed as skirmishers,) and Rigby's battery, occupied the extreme left. The Twelfth New-York militia remained posted behind the first intrenchments, and a portion of Capt. Potts's batte
ch, with one inch of India-rubber beneath, according to my method now patented. I still hope an opportunity may yet be given me to make a second attempt to destroy the Arkansas, as I believe it can be done, and I am ready and can do it. Very respectfully, your obed't servant, W. D. Porter, Commanding Division of the Fleet in the Western Waters. Commander Walke's report. gunboat Carondelet, July 15, 1862. sir: In obedience to your orders, passed to me yesterday by acting Fleet-Capt. Phelps, I got under way this morning, accompanied by the gunboat Tyler and steam-ram Queen of the West, and proceeded up the Yazoo on a reconnoissance. We had proceeded about six miles up the river, when we discovered a formidable-looking rebel ram or gunboat, since proved to be the celebrated Arkansas. The Queen of the West, Tyler and Carondelet at once retreated down the river to avoid being inevitably sunk, firing upon her with our stern and occasionally with our side-guns. The enem
ram fleet, above Vicksburgh, Miss., August 21, 1862. the rams Switzerland, Monarch, Sampson, and Lioness, of Col. Alfred W. Ellet's Mississippi ram fleet, in connection with the gunboats Benton, Mound City, and Gen. Bragg, under command of Capt. Phelps, of the Benton, (who is in command of the gunboat flotilla during Commodore Davis's illness,) together with the transports A. McDowell and Rocket, with the Fifty-eighth and Seventy-sixth regiments Ohio volunteers, and a battalion of cavalry, uere picked up in the town. One of the gunboat men found a silver goblet with Dan Sickles's name on it. It was captured by one of the rebels, and was brought out here, where a man paid fifty dollars for it, as a trophy taken from the Yankees. Capt. Phelps is going to send it to Gen. Sickles. On Monday night we dropped down the river and anchored near the mouth of the Vicksburgh cut-off, which was to cut off Vicksburgh, but did not. The river is now some ten feet below the bottom of the ditch
he short space of an hour he whipped a force of one thousand four hundred, captured Col. Garrett, their commander, a lieutenant, and forty prisoners, together with many of the cavalry horses. The rebels lost thirty killed, with the ordinary proportion wounded. When the enemy broke and fled, the loyal North-Carolinians were fast and fierce in the pursuit of their rebel neighbors. The chase was given up only when the enemy was completely put to flight. The civilians fought splendidly. Mr. Phelps, a carpenter, whose hospitality I have enjoyed, was the first to fire his favorite rifle, taking down the first rebel that fell. In this conflict we lost three men killed--one a Sergeant of company F, of the Zouaves, whose name is Miner; the other a member of the North-Carolina company; and the third, one of Captain Flusser's brave tars, some of whom were engaged. Let officers of higher rank look at the conduct of Sergeant Green, and learn wisdom — the kind of wisdom we now need; and let