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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for S. Ledyard Phelps or search for S. Ledyard Phelps in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
aster; John Pearce, Fourth Master; R. H. Attenborough, Pilot; Isaac D. Gaugh, Pilot; John Ludlow, Surgeon; Baron Proctor, Paymaster; William D. McFarland, Chief Engineer; Samuel H. Lovejoy, First Assistant Engineer; James Armstrong, Second Assistant Engineer; William J. Shannon, Third Assistant Engineer; James McB. Stembel, Master's Mate; Philip Shell, Master's Mate; John R. Hall, U. S. N., Acting Gunner; Thomas B. Gregory, Carpenter; Jacob Vitinger, Armorer. Gun-boat Conestoga. S. L. Phelps, U. S. N., Lieutenant Commanding; John A. Duble. First Master; Charles P. Noble, Second Master; Benjamin Sebastian, Third Master; Richard H. Cutter, Fourth Master; Aaron M. Jordan. Pilot; William Attenborough, Pilot; William H. Wilson, Assistant Surgeon; Alfred Phelps, Acting Paymaster; Thomas Cook, Chief Engineer; Alexander Magee, First Assistant Engineer; Charles Marshall, Second Assistant Engineer; Michael Norton, Third Assistant Engineer; James Kearney, Master's Mate: Henry Hamilton,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
heir claims on the gratitude of their country whenever an opportunity occurred. Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps performed important service in the Tennessee River, his command extending from Forgun-boats being placed at night in the positions assigned them, Phelps dropped Lieutenant Commander S. Ledyard Phelps. down to Decatursville, where he took on board Colonel Breckenridge and fifty mond of the conscription business in that quarter. In the latter part of June, 1863, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps crossed fifteen hundred cavalry under Colonel Conger, of the 10th Missouri Volunteers enemy, abandoned his captured stock and barely succeeded in reaching Savannah, where Lieutenant-Commander Phelps found his troops covered by the Covington. Colonel Bissel, the Confederate commandwin. Steamer Glide.--Acting-Lieutenant S. E. Woodworth. Iron-clad Eastport.--Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps (1864). Steamer Tennessee.--Lieutenant-Commander E, P. Lull (1865). Steamer
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
in himself. It was pleasant to see the United States flag floating over a work which had been built with so much trouble and expense to the Confederates, and the Navy regretted that it could not take a more important part in the affair. Their operations at Fort De Russy showed the fortitude of the Federal soldiers; and, if the rest of Banks' men were of the same material, there was no reason why the army should not reach Shreveport in triumph. An order had been sent to Lieutenant-Commander S. L. Phelps to push on with the fastest and lightest-draft gun-boats to Alexandria. as soon as the army should reach the fort, in order to seize any steamers that might be lying there with steam down. Owing to obstructions in the river, the dispatch-boat carrying the message was delayed five hours, and Phelps reached Alexandria just thirty minutes too late, the swiftest of the naval vessels arriving just in time to see six steamers escaping up the Falls. One of them, the Countess, havin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
-clad steamer Essex. Commander, Robert Townsend; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Allen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. W. Slamm; Acting-Masters, J. C. Parker and E. Reese; Acting-Ensign, Spencer Johnson; Acting-Master's Mates, J. H. Berry and C. M. Fuller; Engineers: Acting-Chief, J. K. Heap; Acting-First-Assistant, J. L. Hillard; Acting-Second-Assistants, E. P. Sprague and C. H. Burt; Acting-Third-Assistants, Henry Wood and Nicholas Saner. Iron-clad steamer Eastport. Lieutenant-Commander, S. L. Phelps; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, M. L. Gerould; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. H. Gilman; Acting-Ensigns, S. Poole, R. M. Williams and E. H. Qualding; Acting-Master's Mates, R. A. Day, R. A. Treat and B. W. Herr; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Henry Hartwig; Acting-First-Assistants, T. F. Ackerman and John S. Moore; Acting-Second-Assistant, G. N. Heizel; Acting-Third-Assistants, W. T. Baxter and J. F. Liddell: Acting-Gunner, J. F. Riblet; Acting-Carpenter, James Rouse. Iron-clad steamer