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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, V. Life in log huts. (search)
the mess kettles. There is a familiar anecdote related of Daniel Webster: that while he was Secretary of State, the French Minister at Washington asked him whether the United States would recognize the new government of France — I think Louis Napoleon's. Assuming a very solemn tone and posture, Webster replied: Why not? The United States has recognized the Bourbons, the French Republic, the Directory, the Council of Five Hundred, the First Consul, the Emperor, Louis XVIII., Charles X., Louis Philippe, the --Enough! Enough! cried the minister, fully satisfied with the extended array of precedents cited. So in regard to using our mess kettles to boil clothes in, it might be asked Why not? Were they not used to boil our meat and Cleaning up. potatoes in, to make our bean, pea, and meat soups in, to boil our tea and coffee in, to make our apple and peach sauce in? Why not use them as wash-boilers? Well, gentle reader, while it might at first interfere somewhat with your appetite
September 24. Louis Philippe d'orleans, Comte de Paris, the heir of Louis Philippe, (the eldest son of his eldest son,) and Robert d'orleans, Duc de Chartres, the brother of Louis Philippe d'orleans, were duly commissioned as captains of volunteers in the service of the United States, and attached to Major-General McClellanLouis Philippe, (the eldest son of his eldest son,) and Robert d'orleans, Duc de Chartres, the brother of Louis Philippe d'orleans, were duly commissioned as captains of volunteers in the service of the United States, and attached to Major-General McClellan's staff as aids. These young princes made it a condition of their service that they should receive no pecuniary compensation. General Prentiss, U. S. A., assumed command of the National forces at St. Joseph, Mo. No man in the whole Western army could have been sent there who is more acceptable to the people north of the HanLouis Philippe d'orleans, were duly commissioned as captains of volunteers in the service of the United States, and attached to Major-General McClellan's staff as aids. These young princes made it a condition of their service that they should receive no pecuniary compensation. General Prentiss, U. S. A., assumed command of the National forces at St. Joseph, Mo. No man in the whole Western army could have been sent there who is more acceptable to the people north of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad; and, under his command, the Union troops, whether Federal or State, are willing to do battle.--National Intelligencer, Sept. 28. A portion of Colonel Geary's force had an action to-day with five hundred rebels on the Virginia side of the Potomac, near Point of Rocks. They were sheltered on a hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
1861, the two brothers, accompanied by the Prince de Joinville, sailed for New York. Toward the close of September they arrived in Washington, and the young Princes at once received authority from the President to enter the Army as aides-de-camp, being permitted to serve without taking the oath of allegiance, and without pay; it was also understood that they should be permitted to leave the service should family or political exigencies require it. They were borne on the Army register as Louis Philippe d'orleans and Robert d'orleans, additional aides-de-camp in the regular Army, with the rank of captain, and were assigned to the staff of the major-general commanding the Army of the Potomac. The Prince de Joinville accepted no rank, and simply accompanied headquarters, on the invitation of the General commanding, as an amateur and friend. The position held by these young gentlemen--as the Prince de Joinville always designated them — was not free from difficulties. Princes who might at
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
rs went on shore for sight-seeing and enjoyment. We landed at a wharf opposite which was a famous French restaurant, Faroux, and after ordering supper we all proceeded to the Rua da Ouvador, where most of the shops were, especially those for making feather flowers, as much to see the pretty girls as the flowers which they so skillfully made; thence we went to the theatre, where, besides some opera, we witnessed the audience and saw the Emperor Dom Pedro, and his Empress, the daughter of Louis Philippe of France. After the theatre we went back to the restaurant, where we had an elegant supper, with fruits of every variety and excellence, such as we had never seen before, or even knew the names of. Supper being over, we called for the bill, and it was rendered in French, with Brazilian currency. It footed up some twenty-six thousand reis. The figures alarmed us, so we all put on the waiters' plate various coins in gold, which he took to the counter and returned the change, making the
k was an inexhaustible source of amusement, because everything ludicrous that struck his fancy on the march was sure to find a place there. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability and of excellent judgment. His deafness was, of course, a disadvantage to him, but his admirable qualities were so marked that I became warmly attached to him, as, in fact, I did to all the three, and I have good reason to know that the feeling was mutual. Whatever may have been the peculiarities of Louis Philippe during his later life, it is very certain that in his youth, as the Duc de Chartres, he was a brave, dashing, and excellent soldier. His sons, especially the Ducs d'orleans, d'aumale, Montpensier, and the Prince de Joinville, showed the same characteristics in Algiers and elsewhere; and I may be permitted to say that my personal experience with the three members of the family who served with me was such that there could be no doubt as to their courage, energy, and military spirit. The
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
reverently retired. Lafayette spent fourteen months in America. He visited Andrew Jackson at the Hermitage, and on his return to Washington his sixty-eighth birthday was celebrated at the White House. He sailed for Europe Sept. 7, 1825, in the frigate Brandywine. During the revolution of 1830, that drove Charles X. from the throne, Lafayette was made commander-in-chief of the National Guard. He sacrificed his own republican preferences for the sake of peace and order, and placed Louis Philippe on the throne. He died the acknowledged chief of the constitutional party on the continent of Europe, May 20, 1834. He received a magnificent public funeral, when his remains were conveyed to their restingplace in the cemetery of Picpus. The monument is about 8 feet square, with appropriate inscriptions in French. The cross seen in the picture stands over the grave of another. The American Revolution. The following is Lafayette's narrative of his service with the American army
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Marbois, Francois de Barbe, Marquis de 1745-1837 (search)
and resided in America until 1785, arranging all the French consulates. He was afterwards appointed Intendant of Santo Domingo, and returned to France in 1790, when he was sent as ambassador to the German Diet. Having offended the ruling party in the course of the fierce French Revolution, he was condemned to exile at Cayenne. On his return, Bonaparte, then First Consul, nominated him as the first councillor of state, and in 1801 he was made secretary of the treasury. He successfully negotiated the sale of Louisiana to the United States in 1803. He served in conspicuous posts in civil life, and was among the first of the senators who voted for the deposition of Napoleon in 1814. Louis XVIII. created him peer and made him keeper of the seals in 1815. Soon after that he was created a marquis. On Napoleon's return from Elba, Marbois was ordered to quit Paris. After the revolution of July, 1830, he took the oath of allegiance to Louis Philippe. He died in Paris, Jan. 14, 1837.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Orleans, Francois Ferdinand Louis Marie, Prince de Joinville 1818- (search)
Orleans, Francois Ferdinand Louis Marie, Prince de Joinville 1818- Son of Louis Philippe, King of the French; born in Neuilly, Aug. 14, 1818; came to the United States in 1861, and with his two nephews, the Count of Paris and the Duke of Chartres, served on the staff of General McClellan for a year, when they returned to France. His son, the Duke of Penthievre, was at the same time a cadet in the Naval Academy at Annapolis. He wrote La guerre d'amerique; Campagne du Potomac, which have been translated into English.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Orleans, Louis Philippe, Count of Paris -1894 (search)
Orleans, Louis Philippe, Count of Paris -1894 Born in Paris, Aug. 24, 1838; served on General McClellan's staff (1861-62); wrote a History of the Civil War in America, which has been translated into English and published in the United States (4 volumes). He died in London, England, Sept. 8, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rochambeau, Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Count de 1725-1807 (search)
Rochambeau, Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Count de 1725-1807 Military officer; born in Vendome, France, July 1, 1725; entered the army at the age of sixteen years, and in 1745 became aid to Louis Philippe, Duke of Orleans. He afterwards commanded a regiment, and was wounded at the battle of Lafeldt. He was distinguished in several battles, especially at Minden. When it was resolved by the French monarch to send a military force to America, Rochambeau was created a lieutenant-general and Count De Rochambeau. placed in command of it. He arrived at Newport, R. I., in July, 1780, and joined the American army under Washington, on the Hudson, a few miles above New York. He led his army to the Virginia peninsula, and assisted in the capture of Cornwallis at Yorktown, Oct. 19, 1781, when he was presented with one of the captured cannon. In 1783 he received the decoration of Saint Esprit, and in 1791 was made a marshal of France. Early in 1792 he was placed in command of the
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