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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 18 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
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ed, and, so far as is known, fifteen were wounded. A number of men are missing, but it is supposed they were taken prisoners. Four of the enemy--one an officer — are known to have been killed, and not less than thirty were wounded in the different skirmishes. The names of the killed and wounded, so far as ascertained, are as follows: Private George Bradley, Co. G, Ninth New-York cavalry, killed; Lieut. John T. Rutherford, Co. L, Ninth New-York cavalry, wounded in left shoulder; private John Phillips, Co. A, Ninth New-York cavalry, left arm, slightly ; private John L. Brewster, Co. C, Ninth New-York cavalry, slightly; Lieut. Marvin, First Michigan cavalry, slightly; Lieut. N. Herrick, Co. A, Ninth New-York cavalry, was wounded, and is supposed to be a prisoner. Corporal S. A. Pitcher, First Michigan cavalry; Sergt.-Major Smith, of Ninth New-York; Corp. Batten, of the Second Pennsylvania cavalry; private Gatten, Ninth New-York cavalry, and several others, were captured, but suc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
t soldiers, who treated them as rebels, without rights which the British were bound to respect. The most necessary articles of food had risen to enormous prices, and horse-flesh was welcomed, when it could be procured, as a savory dish. For a supply of fuel, the pews and benches of churches and the partitions and counters of warehouses were used, and even some of the meaner uninhabited dwellings were demolished for the same purpose. In 1822 Boston was first incorporated a city, and John Phillips was elected the first mayor. It then contained about 50,000 inhabitants. The 1st of May was appointed by the charter the beginning of its municipal year, and the ceremonies of inducting the mayor and other officers into their official places were attended at Faneuil Hall. After an introductory prayer by Rev. Dr. Baldwin, senior minister of the city, Chief-Justice Parker administered the oaths of allegiance and office to the mayor-elect, who ad ministered similar oaths to other officer
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burgoyne, Sir John, 1723-1792 (search)
reconciliation, offered a ratification of the convention, signed by themselves; but Congress would recognize no authority inferior to the British ministry for such an act. Finally, in pursuance of a resolution of Congress (Oct. 15, 1778), the whole body of the captives (4.000 in number), English and German, after the officers had signed a parole of honor respecting their conduct on the way, took up their line of march, early in November, for Charlottesville, Va., under the command of Major-General Phillips. Col. Theodoric Bland was appointed by Washington to superintend the march. It was a dreary winter's journey of 700 miles through New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Marlyland and Virginia. The routes of the two nationalities were sometimes distant from each other, and sometimes the same, until they reached Valley Forge, when they went in the same line until they had crossed the Potomac River. They remained in Virginia until October, 1780, when the danger that the cap
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
driven through North Carolina into Virginia. After the battle at Guilford Courthouse (q. v.) Cornwallis marched towards the seaboard, satisfied that he could no longer hold the Carolinas. He arrived at Wilmington April 7, 1781, then garrisoned by a small force under Major Craig, where he remained long enough to rest and recruit his shattered army. Apprised of Greene's march on Camden, and hoping to draw him away from Lord Rawdon, the earl marched into Virginia and joined the forces of Phillips and Arnold at Petersburg. So ended British rule in the Carolinas forever. He left Wilmington April 25, crossed the Roanoke at Halifax, and reached Petersburg May 20. Four days afterwards he entered upon his destructive career in Virginia. A few days after he reached Williamsburg, Cornwallis received an order from Sir Henry Clinton to send 3,000 of his troops to New York, then menaced by the allied (Americans and French) armies. Clinton also directed the earl to take a defensive positi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phillips, John 1719-1795 (search)
Phillips, John 1719-1795 Philanthropist; born in Andover, Mass., Dec. 6, 1719; graduated at Harvard College in 1735. He founded Phillips Academy at Andover and Phillips Academy at Exeter. He died in Exeter, N. H., April 21, 1795. His nephew, Samuel Phillips, was born in Andover, Feb. 7, 1751; graduated at Harvard College in 1771; was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress four years; State Senator twenty years; and president of the Senate fifteen years; a judge of the court of common pleas; commissioner of the State to deal with Shays's insurrection, and was lieutenantgovernor of the State at his death. He left $5,000 to the town of Andover, the interest of which was to be applied to educational purposes. He was one of the founders of the Academy of Arts and Sciences at Boston. He died in Andover. Mass., Feb. 10, 1802. Phillips, Wendell
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phillips, Wendell 1811-1884 (search)
Phillips, Wendell 1811-1884 Orator and reformer; born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 29, 1811; son of John Phillips, the first mayor of Boston; graduated at Harvard College in 1831, and at the Cambridge Law School in 1833, and was admitted to the bar in 1834. At that time the agitation of the slavery question was violent and wide-spread, and in 1836 Mr. Phillips joined the abolitionists. He conceived it such a wrong in the Constitution of the United States in sanctioning slavery that he could nor the murder, in the city of Alton, Ill., of Rev. Elijah P. Lovejoy, who fell in defence of the freedom of the press. Mr. Phillips was an eloquent, logical, and effective speaker. He conscientiously abstained from voting under the Constitution, ands dissolution, April 9, 1870. He died in Boston, Mass., Feb. 2, 1884. The War for the Union. In December, 1861, Mr. Phillips delivered a patriotic address in Boston, which is here reprinted, somewhat abridged. Ladies and Gentlemen,—It wou
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
usetts, in order to give expression to this opposition in a manner to be audible on the floor of Congress. At Boston, on December 3d, 1819, a meeting was held in the State-house, without distinction of party, and embracing the leaders of both sides. That meeting, in its objects, was precisely like this now assembled. A large committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne
usetts, in order to give expression to this opposition in a manner to be audible on the floor of Congress. At Boston, on December 3d, 1819, a meeting was held in the State-house, without distinction of party, and embracing the leaders of both sides. That meeting, in its objects, was precisely like this now assembled. A large committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
very Society he had attended four others, to each of which a word must be given. One was the quarterly meeting of the same Society at Lynn, March 28, memorable for the maiden speech, in the anti-slavery cause, of Wendell Phillips, Son of John Phillips, the first mayor of Boston; a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1831. He had studied law, as has been already noticed (ante, 1.453), and been admitted to the Suffolk bar. His high social position, his profession, his fascinating pes heart, And feel its solemn pulses sending blood Through all the wide-spread veins of endless good. See also the tribute of the Board of Managers of the Mass. A. S. Society, evidently from Mr. Garrison's pen, in Lib. 9: 95, on the eve of Mr. Phillips's departure for Europe. who charmed and surprised the Lib. 7.55, 62. audience, and signalized his complete adhesion to the movement and his abandonment of legitimate worldly ambition by urging a resolution, which would be heard Lib. 7.62. fr
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, Biographical sketch of Wendell Phillips. (search)
Biographical sketch of Wendell Phillips. Universal liberty was the inheritance of Wendell Phillips. The blood of unmitigated Puritan and of unsullied Revolutionary sires ran in his veins. Freedom of thought and of religion had been the stamping-ground of his ancestors. He strove for them, no less than for freedom of being and of action. Born in Boston,--of which city his father, John Phillips, was the first mayor,--on the 29th of November, 1811, he was early destined to strange distinctions. In 1831 he was graduated from Harvard College; in 1834 he completed a course of study at the Harvard Law School, and received the degree of bachelor of laws. In the same year he was admitted to practise at the Suffolk bar. To him, however, the law was not the all-absorbing study of a lifetime; and, impatient of its details, he sought recreation in the exciting topics of the times. Already, when he came to sign the roll of the court as a member of the bar of Suffolk, had he ventur
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