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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, The murder of Lovejoy. (search)
sking the use of Faneuil Hall for a public meeting. The request was refused. Dr. Channing then addressed a very impressive letter to his fellow-citizens, which resulted in a meeting of influential gentleman at the Old Court Room. Resolutions, drawn by Hon. B. F. Hallett, were unanimously adopted, and measures taken to secure a much larger number of names to the petition. This call the Mayor and Aldermen obeyed. The meeting was held on the 8th of December, and organized, with the Hon. Jonathan Phillips for Chairman. Dr. Channing made a brief and eloquent address. Resolutions, drawn by him, were then read and offered by Mr. Hallett, and seconded in an able speech by George S. Hillard; Esq. The Hon. James T. Austin, Attorney-General of the Commonwealth, allowed in a speech of the utmost bitterness, styled by the Boston Atlas a few days after most able and triumphant. He compared the slaves to a menagerie of wild beasts, and the rioters at Alton to the orderly mob which thre
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The old South meeting House (1876). (search)
t money-rings or demagogues armed with sensual temptations. Men marvelled at the uprising which hurled slavery to the dust. It was young men who dreamed dreams over patriot graves,--enthusiasts wrapped in memories! Marble, gold, and granite are not real; the only actual reality is an idea. Gentlemen, I remember,--Mr. Chairman, you will remember, also,--that some six months ago the mayor and aldermen debated how they should use some eighteen or twenty thousand dollars left them by Jonathan Phillips to ornament the streets of Boston; and then the city government decided — and decided very properly -that they could do no better with that money than place before the people a statue of the great mayor, Josiah Quincy, to whom this city owes so much. It was a very worthy vote under those circumstances; but: if the great mayor were living to-day, he would be he-e with the Massachusetts — yes, he would be here, Mr. Chairman, with the Massachusetts Historical Society in his right hand, a
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The Bible and the Church (1850). (search)
on at the Melodeon, Boston, May 28-30, 1850. A clergyman by the name of Corliss having expressed his fears that some of the advocates of the slaves were lacking in a due appreciation of the Bible, and were therefore tending toward infidelity, Mr. Phillips rose and said:-- I wish to say one word in regard to the remarks which have been addressed to us, in order that the Antislavery enterprise may stand aright before this audience. It might be judged from the tone of the last speaker, that thstaments taken together represent the struggle betwixt the established and progressing,--between the priesthood and the prophets. I want to read you this morning, the description which God gives of both, partly in words, partly in action. [Mr. Phillips then read one or two passages from the Old Testament, and said:--] If you have heard of a church where a man could say, after a quarter of a century of experience, I lived a life of worldliness and trickery; I stood in the market-place and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
be fitly included in this narrative. At a meeting held in Faneuil Hall, on the day he sailed, Dr. Channing, Hillard, and George Bond denounced the murder of Lovejoy, the anti-slavery editor; and Wendell Phillips began his career as an orator by his reply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there was much wild talk, particularly in the State of Maine, of war with England. A graver difficulty had arisen at another point on our frontier. The burning of the Caroline on the American shore by the British authorities—her offence being that she had been freshly used for hostile purposes
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
d success. Both write about it in terms of the warmest admiration. So the prophecy is coming to pass! The laurel is suspended over your head. Fame and fortune are becoming your handmaidens. I have not yet seen the pieces belonging to Jonathan Phillips The Cupid of Crawford belonged to Mr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abydos and a bas-relief of Christ blessing Children, to Mr. Parker. or John Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hourMr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abydos and a bas-relief of Christ blessing Children, to Mr. Parker. or John Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hour of leisure, when I may wander abroad by daylight, I shall call and see them. You will see much of my friends this winter in Rome. I long to refresh my parched lips at the living fountains of art bursting forth from dead Rome, and should have delight in joining Howe and his lovely group; but I must try to see with their eyes. Greene has given you fresh tidings of American life and of our circle,—your friends here. He must have found us dull and prosaic, and I doubt not hurried back with a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
r is going forward. . . . At half past 8 we adjourned in mass, after a very lively talk, from the tavern, which was the well-known Crown and Anchor, in the Strand, to the Geological Rooms at Somerset House. . . . . Sedgwick read a synopsis of the stratified rocks of Great Britain; an excellent, good-humored extemporaneous discussion followed, managed with much spirit by Greenough, the first President, and founder of the Society; Murchison; Lyell, the well-known author; Stokes; Buckland; and Phillips of York. . . . . May 24.—Dined at Holland House, with Lady Fitzpatrick, Mr. Akerley,—who has done such good service as chairman of the committee on the Poor-Laws,—Lord Shelburne, Sir James Kempt,— who is thankful to be no longer Governor-General of Canada,— Lord John Russell, Allen, and two others. It was a pleasure to dine in that grand old Gilt Room, with its two ancient, deep fireplaces, and to hear Lord Holland's genial talk, for I cannot help agreeing with Scott, that he is the mos
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
, was much talked about; and men of forecast began to say openly that, unless something of a like character were done in Boston, the scientific and literary culture of this part of the country would follow trade and capital to the metropolis, which was thus taking the lead. Still, nothing effectual was done. Among the persons with whom Mr. Ticknor had, of late years, most frequently talked of the matter, Dr. Channing was dead, Mr. Abbott Lawrence had become Minister to England, and Mr. Jonathan Phillips was growing too infirm to take part in public affairs. The subject, however, kept its hold on Mr. Ticknor's mind. His idea was that which he felt lay at the foundation of all our public institutions, namely, that in order to form and maintain our character as a great nation, the mass of the people must be intelligent enough to manage their own government with wisdom; and he came, though not at once, to the conclusion that a very free use of books, furnished by an institution supp
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
ell as the Old Year leaves off, except that it makes me no younger, but adds to my days, which get to be rather burthensome. However, that is no matter; I eat well, drink well, and sleep well; I can read all the time, and do it; but as to walking, it is nearly among the lost arts. But you must come and see. I hear of you in town now and then, and hope for you constantly. Mr. Minot, who is older than you are, gets up the hill every now and then; and the other day absolutely met here Judge Phillips, from Cambridge, who is quite as old as he is. So I do not despair. Practically, you are younger than I am. So is Cogswell; but he moves as little, almost, as I do. We all, from my wife down, send our love to you, and want to see you. We shall not any of us have such another winter to move about in,—hardly many days like to-day. Look out, therefore, for tomorrow. Yours from 1804-5, Geo. Ticknor. To the King of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., September 29, 1870. Sire,—Your Majes
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Peter, America Pinkney, T. 38; Britannia Wellington, 38; Columbia Washington, 38; Thomas, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peters, of Merton, II. 168. Petrarch, letter on, I. 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, T. 15, 352, II. 222. Phillips, Jonathan, II. 300. Phillips, Professor J., I. 422, 437 and note, II. 176. Phillips, Thomas J., I. 443, II. 155. Phillips, Willard, I. 391, II. 489. Piacenza, visits (Placentia), I. 162, II. 338. Picard, William, letter to, 11. 455. Phillips, Professor J., I. 422, 437 and note, II. 176. Phillips, Thomas J., I. 443, II. 155. Phillips, Willard, I. 391, II. 489. Piacenza, visits (Placentia), I. 162, II. 338. Picard, William, letter to, 11. 455. Piccolomini, Monsignor, II. 67, 68. Pichler, Caroline, 11. 12. Pichon, Baron, I. 132, 261, II. 113, 114, 120. Pickering, John, I. 85, 391, II. 251. Pickering, Octavius, I. 391. Pictet, Deodati, I. 153, II. 37. Pictet, Professor, I. 153, 155, 159, II. 37. Pierce, Professor B., II. 310. Pillans, James, I. 280. Piltz, Dr., II. 313. Pinkney, William, I. 39, 40, 41 and note. Pisa, visits, II. 92-94. Pittsfield, Mass., Elisha Ticknor head of school in, I. 2. Pins VII
William Brooker, appointed, 1717 Philip Musgrave, appointed, 1719 Thomas Lewis, in office, 1726 Henry Marshall, in office, 1727 John Boydell, in office, 1732 Ellis Huske, in office, 1734 John Franklin, in office, 1754 Jonathan Phillips, in office, 1787 Postmaster Aaron Hill, appointed, 1808 Nathaniel Green, appointed, 1829 George W. Gordon, appointed, 1841 William Hayden, appointed, 1849 George W. Gordon, appointed, 1850 Edwin C. Bailey, appointed, ht, Aug. 9, 1816 Two women sent there for murder, Dec. 24, 1818 Three women sent for life, for robbery, May 28, 1823 Prison State's. The north wing built, 1829 J. Howes sentenced for life, and three years extra, Oct. 10, 1835 Phillips played a hoax on the officers, May 10, 1849 The west wing built, 1850 The west wing enlarged, 1867 A new prison built at Concord, 1877 Prizes British vessels, daily captured and brought in, Sept., 1776 Provident Institution for
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