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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
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n, First Sergt. Jos. Messick, Israel Lamm, Charles Keys, Solomon Bates, Thomas Ennis, Corporal David Zeck, Wm. H. Thomas, Thomas Batliff, Corp. Samuel Little, Owen Phillips, John Riprogle, Musician Upton Talhelm, Jacob Schulz, Corporal Joseph Dorep, Henry B. Smith, Alnut A. Frulghum, Corporal George Dunlap, Lafayette Larsh, Rufus ut two guns of his battery under his immediate command on the morning of the surrender; had probably one hundred rounds of all kinds, but no long-time fuses. Capt. Phillips had expended all his ammunition except some forty rounds of canister and some long-range shell too large for his guns. Capt. McGrath's battery had been spikexty-fifth Illinois,840 First Maryland Home Brigade,800 Third Maryland Home Brigade,500 Fifth New-York Artillery,267 Graham Battery,110 Fifteenth Indiana128 Phillips's New-York Battery,120 Potts's Battery,100 Rigby's Battery,100 Officers connected with Headquarters and Commissary Department,50 Scattering cavalry,50 Sick
eut.-Colonel U. S. Volunteers, Commanding Sixty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. List of officers and men of company A, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers, taken prisoners by Kirby Smith, August thirtieth, 1862, at Richmond, Ky.: Capt. John H. Finley, First Lieut. M. M. Lacy, Second Lieut. George C. Garretson, First Sergt. Jos. Messick, Israel Lamm, Charles Keys, Solomon Bates, Thomas Ennis, Corporal David Zeck, Wm. H. Thomas, Thomas Batliff, Corp. Samuel Little, Owen Phillips, John Riprogle, Musician Upton Talhelm, Jacob Schulz, Corporal Joseph Dorep, Henry B. Smith, Alnut A. Frulghum, Corporal George Dunlap, Lafayette Larsh, Rufus Newman, John C. Kitselman, Cornelius Downs, John W. Voss, Frank Mackey, Joseph Holliday, Charles Cockayne, Henry Thilker, John Hall, Sergeant Chas. M. Scarce, Louis Shofer, Daniel Bennett, Lewis Craig, Robert Shemely, George Hort, John Seaman, Jas. Green, Chas. Woody, Samuel Jeffery, John Phares, Chas. Besselman, Philip I. Metzger,
rounds, with the exception of canister; had only canister left. Capt. Graham had but two guns of his battery under his immediate command on the morning of the surrender; had probably one hundred rounds of all kinds, but no long-time fuses. Capt. Phillips had expended all his ammunition except some forty rounds of canister and some long-range shell too large for his guns. Capt. McGrath's battery had been spiked and left on Maryland Heights on Saturday. It appears that during the siege, andieth Ohio,800 Eighty-seventh Ohio--three months regiment,850 Ninth Vermont,806 Sixty-fifth Illinois,840 First Maryland Home Brigade,800 Third Maryland Home Brigade,500 Fifth New-York Artillery,267 Graham Battery,110 Fifteenth Indiana128 Phillips's New-York Battery,120 Potts's Battery,100 Rigby's Battery,100 Officers connected with Headquarters and Commissary Department,50 Scattering cavalry,50 Sick and wounded in hospitals,312   Total,11,583 All of the cavalry, numbering abo
nts (First, Second, and Third) lay in camp at Wolf Creek, under directions of Colonel Furness, the ranking commander, Col. Phillips, of the Third, selected one thousand two hundred men picked from the three regiments, and a section of Captain Allen's battery, under Lieut. Baldwin. Col. Phillips sent Major Forman down the west side of Grand River with one half of the force and the two pieces of artillery, (Parrott guns.) The other six hundred men went down with him through Talequa and Park Hilln Major Forman's rear. At noon, Col. Taylor, with his command as enumerated, started up the Park Hill road, and met Colonel Phillips about two o'clock. The loyal Indians had been sent forward in three columns, converging to a point a few miles frrn any thing of Major Forman, or the artillery, and being unwilling to enter Gibson without having his forces united, Col. Phillips crossed the Grand River, and proceeded up that stream to find the rest of his force. The three hundred and fifty men
t Wisconsin infantry on their left; three pieces of Stockton's battery and the Second battalion Tenth Kansas infantry being kept in reserve. The enemy was in strong position, behind stone walls and massive buildings. They were reenforced in the forenoon, and, as prisoners say, one thousand strong. I awaited anxiously for the arrival of Col. Hall on the right flank of the enemy, keeping the enemy in check by my artillery. An attempt to force our left flank was nobly rejected by Colonel Phillips's Third Indian home guards, supported by our reserve. My intention was to advance upon the enemy with the whole force at the arrival of Col. Hall, but when he had not arrived toward sunset, I ordered the retreat. Shortly afterward I was informed that Col. Hall was two miles in my rear in the timber. It became now dark. Gen. Rains was reported to be arriving, and I fell back on my defence at this place. Why Colonel Hall did not come in time, and on the road he reported he would co