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Samuel Phillips day, American correspondent of the London Herald, writes to that paper as follows Having found universal profanity at the North, and piety at the South, he adds: One officer informed me that, in giving orders for the first volley, which took such tremendous effect, he addressed his men thus: The Lord have mercy on their souls! but fire.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phillips, John 1719-1795 (search)
ps, John 1719-1795 Philanthropist; born in Andover, Mass., Dec. 6, 1719; graduated at Harvard College in 1735. He founded Phillips Academy at Andover and Phillips Academy at Exeter. He died in Exeter, N. H., April 21, 1795. His nephew, Samuel Phillips, was born in Andover, Feb. 7, 1751; graduated at Harvard College in 1771; was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress four years; State Senator twenty years; and president of the Senate fifteen years; a judge of the court of commonincial Congress four years; State Senator twenty years; and president of the Senate fifteen years; a judge of the court of common pleas; commissioner of the State to deal with Shays's insurrection, and was lieutenantgovernor of the State at his death. He left $5,000 to the town of Andover, the interest of which was to be applied to educational purposes. He was one of the founders of the Academy of Arts and Sciences at Boston. He died in Andover. Mass., Feb. 10, 1802. Phillips, Wendell
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
surgical instruments, he rode on horseback to Bunker Hill and shared in the battle. While a clergyman, he was accustomed to receive students of the academy into his family. At the suggestion of Washington, when President, Colonel William Augustus Washington sent his two sons, Bushrod and Augustine, to the academy; and Charles Lee also sent the two sons of his deceased brother, Richard Henry Lee. The young Washingtons were received into the family of Rev. Mr. French. Memoir of Hon. Samuel Phillips, Ll.D, by Rev. John L. Taylor. Boston, 1856. pp. 253-256. Josiah Quincy was, from 1778 to 1786, an inmate of Mr. French's family, while pursuing his studies at the academy under Mr. Pemberton and his predecessor, Dr. Eliphalet Pearson, afterwards Hancock Professor at Harvard College. Life of Josiah Quincy, by his son, Edmund Quincy, Boston, 1867, p. 26, where an account is given of Mr. French's family life. Mr. French has been commended for his fidelity and success as a Christian tea
. 16 Ap. 1738, d. young; Layton, bap. 11 Mar. 1738-9, d. young; John, bap. 30 Mar. 1740; George, bap. 5 July 1741, d. young; Phebe, bap. 14 Aug. 1743, m. Hon. Samuel Phillips, Jr., of Andover 6 July 1773 (who was elected Lt.-gov. of Mass. 1801), and d. 1812; Francis, bap. 18 Nov. 1744. Francis the f. spent most of his life in thhabits, he was reduced to poverty, and d. in the almshouse 23 Sept. 1813; his w. Abigail d. 25 May 1801. 40. Henry, s. of Henry (28), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Samuel Phillips; they bought a house and two rods square of ground, on the east side of North Avenue, opposite the Common, 16 Nov. 1778, which was seized on execution by Dr. v. 1808. 41. Josiah H., s. of Seth (30), m. Sarah Hutchinson of Chs. 5 Ap. 1795. and had Sarah Hutchinson, bap. 7 Feb. 1796; Mary Wright, bap. 1 Ap. 1798; Samuel Phillips, b. 20 Ap. 1800, d. 21 Nov. 1821; Emily, bap. 30 May 1802; Elmira, bap. 24 Mar. 1805; Josiah Harrington; Rebecca, bap. 30 Sept. 1810; Olive, bap. 24 May 1812,
izabeth, bap. 30 Mar. 1729, m. Benjamin Brandon 4 Jan. 1750, and d. before 1765; Thomas, bap. 24 Jan. 1730-31, d. young; Martha, bap. 4 Feb. 1732-3, d. young; Francis, bap. 29 June 1735, d. young; George, bap. 6 June 1736, fell into scalding wort 19 Aug. 1739, and d. the next day; Katherine, bap. 24 Ap. 1737, d. young; William, bap. 16 Ap. 1738, d. young; Layton, bap. 11 Mar. 1738-9, d. young; John, bap. 30 Mar. 1740; George, bap. 5 July 1741, d. young; Phebe, bap. 14 Aug. 1743, m. Hon. Samuel Phillips, Jr., of Andover 6 July 1773 (who was elected Lt.-gov. of Mass. 1801), and d. 1812; Francis, bap. 18 Nov. 1744. Francis the f. spent most of his life in the public service. It is stated in an obituary notice, published in the Boston News Letter, 31 Mar. 1768, that he was early appointed Register of Probate for the County of Middlesex, which office he sustained for many years [1719-1731]; was clerk of the Hon. House of Representatives; was Register of Deeds forty-four years [forty-fi
ordman, and had David Gorham, bap. 19 Mar. 1780; Susanna, bap. 10 Oct. 1796, m.—— Pond. He had also William, a hackman and afterwards a florist; John; Rebecca. William the f. inherited, in the right of his wife, a part of the Bordman Estate, on North Avenue, and bought 18 May 1779 another portion; but in consequence of thriftless habits, he was reduced to poverty, and d. in the almshouse 23 Sept. 1813; his w. Abigail d. 25 May 1801. 40. Henry, s. of Henry (28), m. Elizabeth, dau. of Samuel Phillips; they bought a house and two rods square of ground, on the east side of North Avenue, opposite the Common, 16 Nov. 1778, which was seized on execution by Dr. William Gamage 20 Jan. 1791. He rem. to New Hampshire, and was residing in Windham 1797; but afterwards returned and d. here 12 Nov. 1806; his w. Elizabeth d. 24 Feb. 1807. They had children Henry and Thomas (felo de se), and perhaps others. 41. Benjamin, s. of Smith (29), m. Ruth Worthylake 10 Dec. 1767, in Wat., and had Benj
. several years in Camb., and d. in Somerville 6 June 1863; Martha, b. 10 Jan. 1802, m. Samuel Stedman 1823, and d. 28 Nov. 1874; and probably others. 40. Edward s. of Seth (30), m. Lydia Adams 9 May 1786, and had Jeremiah, bap. 28 Sept. 1788, and d. 29 Jan. 1827; Lydia, bap. 15 Feb. 1789, d. 29 Aug. 1790; Lydia, bap. 6 Mar. 1791; Sophia, bap.--Sept. 1793; Edward, bap, 8 Nov. 1795; Leonora, bap. 11 Mar. 1798; Mary Ann, b. about 1800. Edward the f. d. 3 Nov. 1808. 41. Josiah H., s. of Seth (30), m. Sarah Hutchinson of Chs. 5 Ap. 1795. and had Sarah Hutchinson, bap. 7 Feb. 1796; Mary Wright, bap. 1 Ap. 1798; Samuel Phillips, b. 20 Ap. 1800, d. 21 Nov. 1821; Emily, bap. 30 May 1802; Elmira, bap. 24 Mar. 1805; Josiah Harrington; Rebecca, bap. 30 Sept. 1810; Olive, bap. 24 May 1812, d. 25 Sept. 1815; Hannah, bap. 17 Aug. 1814. Jo-Siah H. the f. d. 15 Mar. 1815; his w. Sarah d. 25 May 1843, a. 68. Phebe, d. 8 July 1642. Thomas, d. 21 July 1653. Rachel, d. 15 Aug. 1778, a. 29.
0, a. 18 mos.; Lydia, bap. 6 Mar. 1791; Sophia, hap.—Sept. 1793; Edward, bap. 8 Nov. 1795, m. Abigail Harrington, 30 Dec. 1818; Leonora, bap. 11 Mar. 1798; Mary Adams, bap. 15 Mar. 1801. 24. Josiah Harrington, s. of Seth (13), m. Sarah Hutchinson of Chas., 5 Apr. 1795. He o. c. here 31 Jan. 1796, and she was adm. to this ch. 12 Sept. 1802. He d. 15 Mar. 1815, a. 4 [7], and his wid. Sarah d. 25 May, 1843, a. 68. Had Sally Hutchinson, bap. 7 Feb. 1796; Mary Wright, bap. 1 Apr. 1798; Samuel Phillips, bap. 20 Apr. 1800, d. 21 Nov. 1821, a. 21; Emily, bap. 30 May, 1802; Josiah Harrington; Elmira, bap. 24 Mar. 1805, m. Abel Peirce, of Chas., 4 Apr. 1822; Rebecca, bap. 30 Sept. 1810; Olive, bap. 24 May, 1812, d. 25 Sept. 1815, a. 4; Hannah, bap. 17 Aug. 1814. See Wyman, 841. 25. Walter, s. of James (18), m. Rebecca Hill, 24 Dec. 1805; she d. 18 (fun. 19) Dec. 1814, a. 30. He m. second, Lydia Cutter, 19 Jan. 1817—see Cutter (par. 49); Wyman, 839. (He d. 25 Dec. 1831. His wid. m.
laimed to have established the first powder mill in the state during the war. Investigations have revealed where this mill was situated and that the first powder mill was at Andover, and they made powder there in the early part of 1776. Samuel Phillips, Junior, was the leading man in the enterprise but Cox's name not before appeared in print in connection with the works. In Dorchester, afterward Stoughton, the Everendens were makers of powder previous to the Revolution, and in Stoughton the Andover, February 20, 1790. This may certify that Mr. Lemuel Cox was employed in erecting the Powder Mill at Andover in the year 1776 that he discovered great mechanical ingenuity and rendered essential service in executing that work. Samuel Phillips, Jun. Near the close of the Revolution, in October, 1782, we find Lemuel Cox was residing with his family at Taunton. A petition signed by five hundred inhabitants of Boston resulted in a town meeting held Thursday, 10 February 1785,
The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1863., [Electronic resource], Casualties in the late battle near Fredericksburg. (search)
J E Nunn, Sgt S Bonham, mortally; privates Wm Cleveland, Jullen Morvallis, John W Grubbs, T K Glover, Jas Brown, M T Myers, Geo W Joy, Shoddy Connor. Co K — Capt C H Stewart commanding. Killed; Cpl Willis Skinner, privates Samuel Cooty, Samuel Phillips Wounded: Lt E J Bartow, A A A Gen'l to Gen. Paxton; Sgt E R Harrell, privates Amus Coffelit,--Stiller, mortally; Jas H Bull. Fifty Virginia regiment Co A — Wounded: Sgt Oyder, Cpl J Daws, privates H Long C Poggo, J Falkner, F Paan privates J T Beard, S B Hile, Runkle, M M Smith, G Lotts, R Wiserman, James McMameny. H L Wilerman, J N Willtock, Joseph M Block. Co B — Wounded: Lieut G H Killian, Corp'l James Kennedy, privates John Portorfield., W B Tayley, M Murry, W Phillips, E Bezel, G E , Jacob Hoots. Co E — Killed: Private E J Biskely. Wounded: Corp'l W B Trotter, privates W G Abney, J H Bradley, E J Campbell, T J Campbell, J W Cash, J H Davis, W N Harris, Jno H Howard, J Owens, A C Rubush, P M D Hatfield.