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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Jonathan Phillips or search for Jonathan Phillips in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
be fitly included in this narrative. At a meeting held in Faneuil Hall, on the day he sailed, Dr. Channing, Hillard, and George Bond denounced the murder of Lovejoy, the anti-slavery editor; and Wendell Phillips began his career as an orator by his reply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there was much wild talk, particularly in the State of Maine, of war with England. A graver difficulty had arisen at another point on our frontier. The burning of the Caroline on the American shore by the British authorities—her offence being that she had been freshly used for hostile purposes
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
d success. Both write about it in terms of the warmest admiration. So the prophecy is coming to pass! The laurel is suspended over your head. Fame and fortune are becoming your handmaidens. I have not yet seen the pieces belonging to Jonathan Phillips The Cupid of Crawford belonged to Mr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abydos and a bas-relief of Christ blessing Children, to Mr. Parker. or John Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hourMr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abydos and a bas-relief of Christ blessing Children, to Mr. Parker. or John Parker; but hear others, who have seen them, speak of them as I could wish. In my earliest hour of leisure, when I may wander abroad by daylight, I shall call and see them. You will see much of my friends this winter in Rome. I long to refresh my parched lips at the living fountains of art bursting forth from dead Rome, and should have delight in joining Howe and his lovely group; but I must try to see with their eyes. Greene has given you fresh tidings of American life and of our circle,—your friends here. He must have found us dull and prosaic, and I doubt not hurried back with a