Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Picayune or search for Picayune in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
The American Eagle quails before the British Lion, and Ichabod is written on the folds of the Star Spangled Banner. Six months of the year I have spent on the tented field, and while it has been of very great benefit to me physically, I fear that I have suffered loss, mentally, morally, and spiritually. But the sacrifice is made upon the altar of my country. Confederate privateersmen. Letter from President Jefferson Davis. Beauvior, Harrison Co., Miss., June 21 1882. The Picayune of yesterday, in its column of Personal and General Notes, has the following: General William Raymond Lee, of Boston, carries in his pocketbook a little slip of paper bearing the single word Death. It is the ballot he drew, when a prisoner of war in a jail at Richmond, when he and two others were chosen by lot to be hanged, in retaliation for the sentencing to death of certain Confederate officers charged with piracy. The sentence of the pirates was happily commuted, and General Le
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate privateersmen. (search)
Confederate privateersmen. Letter from President Jefferson Davis. Beauvior, Harrison Co., Miss., June 21 1882. The Picayune of yesterday, in its column of Personal and General Notes, has the following: General William Raymond Lee, of Boston, carries in his pocketbook a little slip of paper bearing the single word Death. It is the ballot he drew, when a prisoner of war in a jail at Richmond, when he and two others were chosen by lot to be hanged, in retaliation for the sentencing to death of certain Confederate officers charged with piracy. The sentence of the pirates was happily commuted, and General Lee and his comrades were subsequently exchanged. During the war a persistent effort was made to misrepresent our cause, and its defenders, by the use of inappropriate terms. Our privateers were called pirates, our cruisers were called privateers, and Admiral Semmes, though regularly commissioned, was sometimes called a pirate, by Northern officials and writers