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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pickens, Francis Wilkinson 1805-1869 (search)
Pickens, Francis Wilkinson 1805-1869 Diplomatist; born in St. Paul's parish, S. C., April 7, 1805; became a lawyer, and was Francis Wilkinson Pickens. a distinguished debater in the South Carolina legislature during the nullification excitement. He spoke and wrote much against the claim that Congress might abolish slavery Francis Wilkinson Pickens. a distinguished debater in the South Carolina legislature during the nullification excitement. He spoke and wrote much against the claim that Congress might abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. He was minister to Russia (1857-60); and when South Carolina declared its secession from the Union, he was elected the first governor, or president, of that sovereign nation. He held the office until 1862. Governor Pickens was a successful planter, of great wealth, and was popular in his State as a spared its secession from the Union, he was elected the first governor, or president, of that sovereign nation. He held the office until 1862. Governor Pickens was a successful planter, of great wealth, and was popular in his State as a speaker before colleges and literary institutions. He died in Edgefield, S. C., Jan. 25, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pickens, Fort (search)
Slemmer. It was feared that the small garrison could not hold more than one fort, and it was resolved that it should be Pickens. It was arranged for Armstrong to send the little garrison at the Barrancas on a vessel to Fort Pickens. Armstrong failed to do his part, but Slemmer, with great exertions, had the troops of Barrancas carried over to Pickens, with their families and much of the ammunition. The guns bearing upon Pensacola Bay at the Barrancas were spiked; but the arrangement for th navy-yard near Pensacola was surrendered to Florida and Alabama troops, and these prepared to bring guns to bear upon Pickens and Fort Barrancas. Slemmer was now left to his own resources. His was the strongest fort in the Gulf, but his garriso 4, 1861) a new line of policy was adopted. The government resolved to reinforce with men and supplies both Sumter and Pickens. Between April 6 and 9 the steamers Atlantic and Illinois and the United States steam frigate Powhatan left New York fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pyle, defeat of (search)
rleton) of the near presence of that corps. Lee sent word to Pyle, by one of the young men, of his approach, and, assuming the person of Tarleton, requested him to draw up his corps on one side of the road, that his wearied troops might pass without delay. The order, or request, was obeyed. Lee intended, when be should secure the complete advantage of Pyle, to reveal himself and give his Tory corps the choice, after being disarmed, to join the patriot army or return home. He had ordered Pickens to conceal his riflemen near. Just as Lee (as Tarleton) rode along Pyle's line (March 2, 1781), and had grasped the hand of the latter in an apparently friendly salute, some of the loyalists discovered Pickens's riflemen. Perceiving that they were betrayed, they commenced firing upon the rear-guard of the cavalry, commanded by Captain Eggleston. That officer instantly turned upon the foe, and the movement was followed by the whole column. A terrible fight and slaughter ensued. Of the l
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
Williams1814 Andrew J. Pickens1816 John Geddes1818 Thomas Bennet1820 John L. Wilson1822 Richard J. Manning1824 John Taylor1826 Stephen D. Miller1828 James Hamilton1830 Robert Y. Hayne1832 George McDuflie1834 Pierce M. Butler1836 Patrick Noble1838 B. K. Henneganacting1840 J. P. Richardson1840 James H. Hammond1842 William Aiken1844 David Johnson1846 W. B. Seabrook1848 John H. Means1850 John L. Manning1852 James H. Adams1854 R. F. W. Alston1856 William H. Gist1858 Francis W. Pickens1860 M. L. Bonham1862 A. G. MagrathinauguratedDec. 19, 1864 Benj. F. Perryprovisional, appointedJune 30, 1865 James L. OrrinauguratedNov. 29, 1865 Robert K. ScottinauguratedJuly 9, 1868 F. J. Moses, Jr.1873 Daniel H. Chamberlain1875 Wade Hampton1877 William D. Simpsonassumes officeFeb. 26, 1879 T. B. Jeterassumes officeSept. 1, 1880 Johnson HagoodinauguratedNov. 30, 1880 Governors under Constitution—Continued. Hugh S. Thompson1882 John P. Richardson1886 Benjamin R. Til