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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for John Pickering or search for John Pickering in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 4 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
the eminent physician, who survived till 1867; Rev. Dr. Leonard Woods; and John Pickering. Charles Sumner's tributes to Mr. Pickering are well known. BiographicaMr. Pickering are well known. Biographical Sketch of the late John Pickering, Works, Vol. I. p. 214; The Scholar (Mr. Pickering), the Jurist, the Artist, the Philanthropist, Works Vol. I. p. 241. His collMr. Pickering), the Jurist, the Artist, the Philanthropist, Works Vol. I. p. 241. His college quarterly-bills, including board in commons and tuition, varied from twenty-eight to thirty-six dollars. In college his compositions were largely poetical. Thacher, Simmons, Solicitor General Davis, Governor Lincoln, Josiah Quincy, John Pickering, Harrison Gray Otis, William Minot, Timothy Fuller, Samuel E. Sewall; and, s. He gave a dinner, in 1831, to surviving classmates; at which were present Pickering, Jackson, Thacher, Mason, and Dixwell. He made the duties and history of honeously supposing them to be the defendant's. Commonwealth v. Kennard, 8 Pickering's Reports, p. 133. The decision imposed on executive officers a serious respo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
e attitude of two members, who lay during the evening on the bed, like Abelard and Eloisa on their monument. Sumner competed for the Bowdoin prize in his Senior year, the subject being, The Present Character of the Inhabitants of New England, as Resulting from the Civil, Literary, and Religious Institutions of the First Settlers. In June, he sent in his dissertation, signed, A Son of New England; and, in August, received the second prize of thirty dollars. The committee of award were John Pickering, George Ticknor, and Rev. John G. Palfrey. The tradition is that Sumner's dissertation suffered in the comparison from its great length. Its style, while well-formed, lacks the felicity of expression and fastidiousness in the choice of language which mark his compositions in mature life. In method, it is manly and serious, never trivial, but wanting in condensation. He was, as a living classmate remarks, too full of matter. His citations and extracts show that he left nothing unread
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
seful Knowledge,—a society formed after the example of the famous English association. Its president at that time was Daniel Webster, and its vice-president, John Pickering. The society gave public notice that, on April 1, the envelope corresponding to the manuscript which had been approved as the best would be opened at the Atcted and executed. The points contested at this trial between Franklin Dexter, the defendant's counsel, and Mr. Webster are given in Commonwealth v. Knapp, 10 Pickering's Reports, p. 477. The celebrated argument of Mr. Webster on the earlier trial of John F. Knapp as principal is printed in his Works, Vol. II. pp. 41-105. See Ceat I did, which I now tell in the fulness of friendship rather than vanity. The Boston Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge,—D. Webster, President, John Pickering, V. P.,—offered a premium in books to the author (a minor) of the best dissertation on any thing relating to commerce, trade, and manufactures, to be handed u<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
of personal property, Shurtleff v. Willard, 19 Pickering's Reports, p. 202. and the other, in June, being aon certain medicines. Thomson v. Winchester, 19 Pickering's Reports, p. 214. He was called into the former c which the case was decided. Fuller v. Dame, 18 Pickering's Reports, p. 472. Sumner's name does not appear i your account of yourself in the introduction. John Pickering spoke of it to me in the highest terms. He thie Story has written to Mittermaier; so also has John Pickering. Harvard College gave Mittermaier the degree o to forward to him at the earliest opportunity. Mr. Pickering is about publishing another edition of his Ameriica), March 27, 1837. my dear Sir,—My friend, Mr. Pickering, John Pickering. has communicated to me the fJohn Pickering. has communicated to me the flattering terms which you have used in your letter to him with regard to the American Jurist, a journal with winion. You kindly promised, in your letter to Mr. Pickering, to furnish our journal with information respect