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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John Pickering or search for John Pickering in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
est of them. The only time I have been I found it pleasant enough, but I doubt whether I shall go often. Dictated in 1859. A Mr. Balhorn dedicated to Mr. John Pickering the thesis which he wrote for his doctorate, and, when I went to Germany, Mr. Pickering asked me, if I ever met Mr. Balhorn, to say that he had written twicMr. Pickering asked me, if I ever met Mr. Balhorn, to say that he had written twice to thank him for the compliment, but did not believe his letters had ever reached him, and that he begged him to receive his thanks through me. Their acquaintance was formed at Utrecht, where Balhorn was studying, and when Mr. Pickering was Secretary of Legation in Holland. I had been some time in Gottingen, and had neither hearMr. Pickering was Secretary of Legation in Holland. I had been some time in Gottingen, and had neither heard nor thought anything of the Herr Balhorn; but one day, remembering my commission, asked Prof. Blumenbach if he knew such a person, Why, to be sure; he's here, he's here; and I found that he was tutor to some small prince, and probably when he had educated him he would be his Prime Minister. I made his acquaintance and delivered
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
to another body of persons, who should be selected for the purpose, and I agreed to it, both because it had been discussed enough where it then was, and because some of the members of the club were not, in my estimation, the right persons to discuss it at all. It was agreed the meeting should be small, and Mr. R. Sullivan and myself were desired to call it . . . . . Nine of us therefore assembled at my house July 23, 1823. Rev. Charles Lowell, Judge Story, and Messrs. R. Sullivan and John Pickering, Overseers; Dr. James Jackson and Mr. Ticknor, present officers; Messrs. G. B. Emerson and J. G. Palfrey, former officers; and Mr. W. Sullivan, former Overseer. Mr. Prescott and Mr. Otis were kept away by having to attend a meeting of the Corporation on the same day. For the consideration of these gentlemen Mr. Ticknor had drawn up a paper, the general object and character of which are shown in the following extracts:— It is, I think, an unfortunate circumstance, that all our co
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
ly on Sunday evenings; and conversation full of vivacity and variety drew out the best powers of each on these occasions. Mr. George T. Curtis says In his letter of reminiscences, addressed to Mr. Hillard, already quoted. of the persons who gathered at these suppers:— I recall the two Messrs. Prescott, father and son; Mr. Webster; the Rev. Dr. Channing; Dr. Bowditch, the eminent mathematician and translator of La Place; Dr. Walter Channing, a kind and genial family physician; Mr. John Pickering, a Greek scholar and a learned lawyer; his brother, Octavius Pickering, the Reporter of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts; Mr. Willard Phillips; and Mr. James Savage. There were also many younger men, habitues of the house, whom I cannot recall. The Rev. Dr. Channing came seldom, but it was there I first saw him, and there, also, I first saw Mr. Webster in private. Prescott, the historian, not yet an author, was at that time in the full flush of his early manhood, running over with
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. H., 68 and note, 121. Peter, America Pinkney, 38. Peter, Britannia Wellington, 38. Peter, Columbia Washington, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peter, Thomas, 38. Petrarch, letter on, 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, 15, 352. Phillips, Professor J., 422, 437 and note. Phillips, Thomas J., 443. Phillips, Willard, 391. Piacenza, visits, 162. Pichon, Baron, 132, 261. Pickering, John, 85, 391. Pickering, Octavius, 391. Pictet, Deodati, 153. Pictet, Professor, 153, 155, 159. Pillans, James, 280. Pinkney, William, 39, 40, 41 and note. Pittsfield, Mass., Elisha Ticknor head of school in, 2. Pius VII., 173, 174. Pizarro, Chev. Don L., 207, 208, 212. Playfair, Professor, 276, 279. Plymouth, visits, 327-331. Poinsett, Joel R., 350 and note. Pole, Mrs., 467, 471. Polk, Mr., 381. Ponsonby, Frederic, 443. Porson, Richard, 108. Portal, Dr., 133, 13