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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for William Pickering or search for William Pickering in all documents.

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sachusetts since the adoption of the Constitution of the State in 1780. He was born at Windham, in the District of Maine, about fifteen miles from Portland, on the 31st of May, 1818. The family was of English origin, descending from Robert Andrew, of Rowley village, now Boxford, Essex County, Mass., who died there in 1668. He was connected with most of the ancient families of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. The grandmother of Governor Andrew was the grand-daughter of the brave Captain William Pickering, who commanded the Province Galley, in 1707, for the protection of the fisheries against the French and Indians; and the mother of her husband was Mary Higginson, a direct descendant of the Reverend Francis Higginson, the famous pastor of the first church in the colony. The grandfather of Governor Andrew was a silversmith in Salem, who removed to Windham, where he died. His son Jonathan was born in Salem, and lived there until manhood, when he also removed to Windham. There he m
hn F. Noyes, captain; George E. Davis, Andrew F. Jewett, and Benjamin Warren, lieutenants,—all of Lowell. Company I, Light Infantry, Lawrence. Officers: John Pickering, captain; Daniel S. Yeaton, A. Lawrence Hamilton, Eben H. Ellenwood, and Eugene J. Mason, lieutenants,—all of Lawrence. Company K, Washington Light Guard, Boscars containing band and the following companies; viz., Company C, of Lowell, Captain Follansbee; Company D, of Lowell, Captain Hart; Company I, of Lawrence, Captain Pickering; and Company L, of Stoneham, Captain Dike,—were vacated by the band; and they proceeded to march in accordance with orders, and had proceeded but a short disn separated from the rest of the command after crossing the Susquehanna, had not yet been heard from. These were the companies commanded by Captains Follansbee, Pickering, and Dike. Before they got from the Baltimore Depot, the rebels had barricaded the streets, and removed the rails from the track crossing the city, so the cars <