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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Harper's Ferry and first Manassas. (search)
. Lyt. Macon, See notes 2, 3, 13 and 16. Lanty Blackford, Launcelot M. Blackford, of Lynchburg, Va., later Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 24th Virginia Regiment; now (1900),and for thirty years past, Principal of the Episcopal High School of Virginia. Randolph Fairfax, Randolph Fairfax, of Alexandria, Va., killed, as stated above, at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13th, 1862. Kinloch Kinloch Nelson, of Clarke county, Va., later Lieutenant and Ordnance Officer of Kemper's Brigade, Pickett's Division; Professor in the Episcopal Theological Seminary of Virginia; died a few years and Philip Philip Nelson, of Clarke county, Va., later Lieutenant in the 2d Virginia Regiment of infantry, Stonewall Brigade; now (1900) Superintendent of Schools of Albemarle county, Va. Nelson, Bev. Jones, See notes 2, 3, 13 and 16. Ned Alexander, Edgar S. Alexander, of Moorefield, Hardy county, Va. I have not been able to trace the career of Ned Alexander. and myself. James M. Garnett, o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Biographical Sketch of Lieutenant-Colonel William Frederick Niemeyer, (search)
d February 3d, 1900; was born April 28th, 1816, and married Sarah Howard Chandler (now living) on the 31st day of July, 1839. She is the daughter of John A. Chandler, who was one of the foremost citizens and most distinguished lawyers in Tidewater Virginia of his day. Colonel Niemeyer was the eldest of twelve children, three sisters and nine brothers. His brother, John Chandler Niemeyer, First Lieutenant of Company I, Ninth Virginia Infantry Regiment, was killed in the famous charge of Pickett's Virginians at Gettysburg on the 3d day of July, 1863. William Frederick Niemeyer was a promising child with the noblest predilections. On the death of his grandfather Chandler, when not quite eight years old, he wrote the following tender and touching letter of condolence to his grandmother: April 16, 1848. ,My Dear Grandma: I am very sorry that grandpa died, but the Lord will take care of you; do not weep, he is in the arms of the Lord Jesus Christ; he has got a crown of glory
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
urst immediately over the caisson, killing two horses, the driver and these two men; whereas I, running immediately by the side of the caisson, was not injured in the least. As we reached the road coming out we met Longstreet's Division, with Pickett's Brigade in front, George and Charley Pickett and Dorsey Cullen leading the advance with the men fresh from Richmond, coming up at a double quick. These leaders I had known from boyhood, and as I clasped the hands of these gallant men one at aCharley Pickett and Dorsey Cullen leading the advance with the men fresh from Richmond, coming up at a double quick. These leaders I had known from boyhood, and as I clasped the hands of these gallant men one at a time, tears of excitement forced themselves from my eyes, and I remarked: Unless you break that line we are badly whipped. Wheeling to the right Longstreet pushed his division across the creek and up the hill, and it was only then that the Federal line broke and the yells of our men rang through the gathering darkness shouts of victory, the firing evidently showing that at last General Porter's gallant men had been forced from their position, and the battle of Cold Harbor and Gaines' Mill of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Glowing tribute to General R. E. Lee. (search)
. And here for the first time I experienced what I afterward learned was almost a habit with General Lee--to think aloud. He murmured to himself as if addressing me: Well, Captain, what shall we do? To which inquiry I am pleased to say I had sense enough to make no reply, and, indeed, to appear as if I had not heard it. The man who knew and did. The same question escaped his lips as if in soliloquy when I came to him and told him that the battle of Five Forks had gone against General Pickett, and as I heard his deep bass voice asking, Well, Captain, what shall we do? I felt that nothing short of Almighty Wisdom could provide a way out of that calamity. But it meant nothing. He knew what to do, and he did all that man could do to rectify the blunders that some of his people were constantly committing. Again I saw him the evening of the battle of Sailor's Creek. It was a few minutes before he learned of the great disaster that had befallen Custis Lee's Division and Gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The correspondence of Gen. Robt. E. Lee. (search)
Expects another division next day. Davis to Lee, June 19th, 1863, page 904.Informs General Lee why a part of his army, Pickett's Division, Corse's Brigade, has been detained. Jenkins' Brigade deemed necessary by D. H. Hill to protect Petersburg. arrange to send my Brigade to join General Lee. I have sent scouts to Suffolk. No enemy, no gunboats. General G. A,. Pickett, Berryville Pike, to General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G., A. N. Va., June 21, 1863, page 910.Wants his scattered command sen justify. General Lee to General Samuel Cooper, A. A. G., June 23, 1863, page 925.Urges that Corse's Brigade be sent to Pickett's Division, not needed where it is especially if the plan of assembling an army under Beauregard at Culpeper C. H. is adeld artillery, 104. Artillery, Cavalry. Major-General Elsey's command. Wise's Brigade. Corse's Brigade, of Pickett's Division.Numbers not given. Local troops. Mr. Davis' letter to General Lee, June 28, 1863. Giving reasons why
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
ties at Richmond prior to General Beauregard's assignment to command. Very few troops, other than local militia of an inferior military character, were under General Pickett, commanding at Petersburg. A division of some five thousand troops under General Robert Ransom was at Richmond, beyond the James, but not under General Beaurh Carolina), and a part of the 25th South Carolina, under Major Glover, in all some 600 men arriving at Petersburg, was sent forward towards General Butler by General Pickett, and at Walthall Junction, on the evening of the 6th of May, encountered and repelled the brigade of Heckman, supported by artillery, which had been sent by Bs path and march into Petersburg. His strength and position were now, however, fully developed by the Confederates, and before day on the morning of the 8th, General Pickett, at Petersburg, ordered the force at Walthall Junction to withdraw into the Northern lines, on the south side of Swift Creek, nearer to the city. An advanc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
ns, as did other members of the battery, where I saw in my front the formation of the troops —the eye, as far as it could distinguish the glistening bayonets of Pickett's men, who are now marching up in good order, many of whom, alas, will never return. Presently the signal gun is heard on our right. The charge is on! Oh, whas Dinwiddie Courthouse. After marching all day and night we found ourselves on the Squirrel Level road, where, after passing the infantry, which proved to be General Pickett's troops—the old first Virginia Regiment among them-and shaking hands with Theodore Martin and other Richmond boys, we pushed on and came up with the cavaldiate command of Lieutenant Hollis, having been captured by the troops of Warren, commanding the Fifth Corps), moved off through the woods. About this time General Pickett, coming from the direction of the Forks, rode by the guns of the battery, and in answer to Captain Ellett's query as to where he wanted his guns, ordered him