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and slept or listened to the noise of the fight as Pickett drove the Yankees before him. Nearer and nearer grethree or four miles, the advance. So quietly had Gen Pickett managed his troops, the enemy was entirely withouling shots were fired about two in the morning, but Pickett held back until daylight, when he turned loose upon Yankees in every direction. Then came a race. Gen. Pickett pressed close upon them, and kept them moving toenemy was forced to retreat, their line broken, and Pickett had them on the race. Following close upon them, phis approach was looked for with great anxiety. Gen. Pickett listened anxiously for the sound of his guns, exg to make a demonstration on the extreme right. Gen. Pickett was standing under a tree, in full sight of the mn had halted.--"They must be driven back," said Gen. Pickett; "Can you do it?" "Yes, " replied Hoke, brightenarsay or to draw any inferences. The conduct of Gen. Pickett, Hoke, and Clingman, won my entire admiration, a
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
ts patrol the Appomattox from Port Walthall to the mouth of the river, shelling on both sides every spot likely to afford cover to a party of gray backs. On Friday two of the enemy's gunboats got aground opposite the residence of Mr. Marins Gilliam, and at last accounts had not been gotten off. The enemy were wasting a vast deal of ammunition in that direction yesterday and it was doubtless for the purpose of protecting these grounded craft from "masked batteries" Major Harrison, of Gen Pickett's staff, while reconnoitering yesterday in the vicinity of City Point was suddenly surprised by a party of Yankee pickets, and pursued for some distance. The Major finally succeeded including his pursuers by leaping to the ground and seeking shelter in some undergrowth, from whence he wended his way to a place of safety. He lost his horse, as did also a courier who was with him. Reconnaissance at Chester yesterday. A movement was made by a portion of our troops yesterday mornin
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
atteries of artillery. They also state that twelve regiments of the original force that attacked Plymouth have been sent to Kinston, including two cavalry regiments. It is evident that the rebels are playing a sharp game, and from present intimations design, to visit Newbern at an early day, the distance from Kinston to this point being less than from Plymouth. The command of the rebel forces of this State is now given to Gen Beauregard. Hoke has been promoted to a Major General and Pickett has been assigned to duty in the rebel army of Virginia. It has been ascertained that the ram built at Kinston came down the Nense river a few days since to a point four miles below the town. There, owing to its unwieldy proportions, it stuck fast. This ram draws nine feet of water, and evidently will never be serviceable as the river has fallen several feet within the last few days, and in some places is unnavigable. It is stated that the rebel ram Albemarle if taken down the r
The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry raid, &c. (search)
s patrol the Appomattox from Port Walthall to the mouth of the river, shelling on both sides every spot likely to afford cover to a party of gray backs. On Friday two of the enemy's gunboats got aground opposite the residence of Mr. Marius Gilliam, and at last accounts had not been gotten off. The enemy were wasting a vast deal of ammunition in that direction yesterday and it was doubtless for the purpose of protecting these grounded craft from "masked batteries." Major Harrison, of Gen Pickett's staff, while reconnoitering yesterday in the vicinity of City Point was suddenly surprised by a party of Yankee pickets, and pursued for some distance. The Major finally succeeded including his pursuers by leaping to the ground and seeking shelter in some undergrowth, from whence he wended his way to a place of safety. He lost his horse, as did also a courier who was with him. Reconnaissance at Chester yesterday. A movement was made by a portion of our troops Tuesday morning
A significant fact. --A large proportion of the Yankee prisoners captured by Gen Pickett, near Port Walthall, on Friday, were sixty and ninety-day recruits. This is an important fact, insomuch as it proves that Grant's army has been greatly depleted by the withdrawal of those of his veteran regiments whose term of service has expired, and he is now compelled to throw in the field inexperienced recruits, who were originally enlisted to guard the prisons and fortifications at the North.
r do, 10; Lomax B Smith, (in gold,) 2 50; Miss Maria Curds, 20; Franklin Smith, of Canton, Miss, 100; "Warcia, " a private soldier, 2; J W Randolph, 50; friends in Warrenton, per W R Smith, 615; citizens of Montgomery county, 620; Mr Ellis, of Gen Pickett's division, 2; F Smith, 18; W, 50; Mrs Dr Jas McCaw, 30; Dr R N Hudson, 100; Rd C Cabell, 20; cash per P C N, 10; Dr Stilles's 115; M--,100; a lady, 50; Col a --, 50; a friend in Halifax, N C, 60; a friend, per J D K S, 50; an ordnance officer Serg't R G Blackwell. From the Letcher and Crenshaw batteries, of Lieut Col W J Pegram's battalion. (The other batteries of Pegram's battalion desire to make a similar contribution) From the 30th Va regiment of infantry, Corse's brigade, Pickett's division. From the 1st, 7th, and 11th Tenn and 13th Ala regiments, of Archer's brigade. From the 40th, 47th, and 55th Va regiments and 22d Va battalion; of Walker's brigade. From Gen C A Evans's Brigade. From 1st regiment, 2d, 5th