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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 284 4 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 217 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 199 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 161 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 89 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 87 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for George E. Pickett or search for George E. Pickett in all documents.

Your search returned 81 results in 7 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
ortion of Lee's soldiers under the command of such leaders as Longstreet, D. H. Hill, Hood, and Pickett, who until then had always been arrayed against the Army of the Potomac. In fact, D. H. Hill hia of that State, and about the 26th of February, Longstreet, with three divisions, under Hood, Pickett, and Anderson, had taken up his quarters at Petersburg, south of Richmond. A military departmet noon the Confederates appeared simultaneously on both sides of the Nansemond. Anderson's and Pickett's divisions, coming from the south, one by the route debouching upon Fort Dix, the other by the avail himself of his numerical superiority in order to turn those works. While Anderson's and Pickett's divisions were to occupy the besieged along the right bank of the Nansemond, Hood was to joinand North Carolina), which consisted of Elzey's, French's, D. H. Hill's, Whiting's, Hood's, and Pickett's divisions.—Ed. Consequently, he does not reach Richmond until the 10th of May. On the 11th h
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
ap, a connection being formed between them by Pickett, who was posted on the summit of the ridge. ll the next day. Finally, Longstreet, leaving Pickett's division at Chambersburg, made a march withose of the day. Longstreet was still absent. Pickett's division had remained at Chambersburg for t place on the battlefield. At the same time, Pickett was leaving Chambersburg, and Law the villageured steps, so as not to break its alignment, Pickett's division moves forward solidly and quietly , the Federals even attributing the change in Pickett's direction to this fire—a wrong conclusion, ssigned respectively to them. In fact, while Pickett, who is too much engaged to watch his movemenway from them and disappears amid the smoke. Pickett therefore finds himself alone with his three h circumstances, he succeeds in almost taking Pickett's line in reverse. The troops posted on the ht Wilcox has started in great haste to cover Pickett's flank, but the direction he is following le[51 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
follows, is guarding the four thousand Federal prisoners; Pickett's division will conduct them as far as Williamsport, withond left to be swept away by the current. At the time when Pickett made his decisive charge the only safe means remaining to and McLaws' divisions are resting, only at midnight, while Pickett continues his march toward Williamsport with the Federal p as to be able to protect Imboden against any new attack. Pickett, after giving some rest to his division, conducts the prisimmediately hastens his march on Chester Gap. The rest of Pickett's division, which is arriving with Longstreet, follows hisas been stopped by Buford at the entrance of the pass, but Pickett soon comes to its help, and his deployed infantry drives brought back the main body of his force to Linden Station. Pickett occupies Wapping Heights, the most important of the numeroto Wapping Heights, where Benning during the day will join Pickett's division, and the latter marches on and follows McLaws,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 6 (search)
nce, Lieut.-colonel Baldwin. Assistant Adjutant—General, Lieut.-colonel Murray. Chief of Engineers, Lieut.-colonel Smith. Military Secretary, Colonel Long. First army corps. In the absence of Lieutenant-general Longstreet with Hood's, Pickett's, and Ransom's divisions, the remainder of the corps is under the immediate control of the general-in-chief. 1st division, Maj.-gen. Anderson. 1st brigade, Brig.-general Mahone—6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, 66th Va., Grandy's Battery. 2d brige May 31st. Present under arms.Total Present.Absent.Total. General staff and that of the army corps4747148 First corpsAnderson's division.7,4409,1594,51713,676 McLaws division7,3118,7364,06612,802 Hood's division7,7209,1483,43912,587 Pickett's division6,6877,9454,10512,050 Second corpsHill's division9,29911,3357,07318,408 Rodes' division8,47310,2295,57915,799 Early's division6,9438,3504,71313,063 Johnson's division5,5646,7135,15811,871 Stuart's cavalry division10,29211,9224,807
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 7 (search)
d Law, 4th, 15th, 44th, 47th, 48th Ala. 4th Robertson, 1st, 4th, 5th Texas, 3d Ark. Artillery battalion, Major Henry, 4 batteries. 2d division, Major-general McLaws. 1st brigade, Barksdale, 13th, 17th, 18th, 21st Miss. 2d Kershaw, 2d, 3d, 7th, 8th, 15th, 3d Batt. S. C. 3d brigade, Wofford, 16th, 18th, 24th Ga., Cobb's Legion, Phillips' Legion (Ga.). 4th brigade Semmes, 10th, 50th, 51st, 53d Ga. Artillery battalion, Colonel Cabell, 4 batteries. 3d division, Major-general Pickett. 1st brigade, Kemper, 1st, 3d, 7th, 11th, 24th Va. 2d brigade Armistead, 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, 57th Va. 3d brigade Garnett, 8th, 18th, 19th, 28th, 56th Va. (Brigades of Corse and Jenkins absent.) Artillery battalion, Major Dearing, 4 batteries. Corps artillery, Major Eschelmann, Washington Art., Alexander's Batt., 10 batteries. Second corps. Lieutenant-General Ewell. 1st division, Major-general J. Early. 1st brigade, Smith, 31st, 49th, 52d Va. 2d brigade H
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Notes. (search)
inds the most lifelike description of all the incidents of the struggle and the motives which inspired each movement, and finds fortuitous or voluntary errors, which, on being later accredited, have covered the faults of the one and unjustly condemned the others. We have largely borrowed, for the same campaigns, from the following works: Four Years with General Lee, by Colonel Taylor; Personal Reminiscences of General Lee, by the Rev. J. Wm. Jones; Life of General Lee, by J. Esten Cooke; Pickett and his Men, by W. Harrison; and for that of Vicksburg a narration of the siege by a resident has furnished us with some curious details. Let us quote, in short, among our authors, the most illustrious of all, General Sherman, to whom we owe, under the form of Memoirs, the most original, brilliant, and instructive pages which have ever been written on the war. General Sherman, who has never been ambitious for any political post nor solicited the votes of any political party, has had the ra
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
1863. Cavalry not included; only two brigades, Fitz. Lee's and W. H. F. Lee's, were present. First corps. Lieutenant-general Longstreet, with Hood's and Pickett's divisions and Dearing's and Henry's artillery battalions, in South-eastern Virginia. McLaws' division. Major-general Lafayette McLaws. Wofford's brigad Battery (Troup Artillery). Fraser's Georgia Battery (Pulaski Artillery). McCarthy's Battery (1st Richmond Howitzers). Manly's North Carolina Battery. Pickett's division. Major-general George E. Pickett. Garnett's brigade. Brig.-gen. R. B. Garnett (killed). Major George C. Cabell. 8th Virginia. 18th VirginMajor-general George E. Pickett. Garnett's brigade. Brig.-gen. R. B. Garnett (killed). Major George C. Cabell. 8th Virginia. 18th Virginia. 19th Virginia. 28th Virginia. 56th Virginia. Kemper's brigade. Brig.-gen. J. L. Kemper (wounded). Colonel Joseph Mayo, Jr. 1st Virginia. 3d Virginia. 7th Virginia. 11th Virginia. 24th Virginia. Armistead's brigade. Brig.-gen. L. A. Armistead (killed). Colonel W. R. Aylett. 9th Virginia. 14th Virgin