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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
150; m, 8 = 190. Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Staff loss: m, 1. Toombs's Brigade, Col. Henry L. Benning, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican; 17th Ga., Maj. John H. Pickett (w), Capt. A. C. Jones (k), Capt. Hiram L. French; 20th Ga.,Maj. J. D. Waddell. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 327 = 367. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 50th Ga.,-----; 51st Ga.,-----; 15th S. C.,-----; Phillips's (Ga.) Legion,kins (w), Col. Joseph Walker: 1st S. C., Col. Thomas J. Glover (k); 2d S. C. (Rifles)-----; 5th S. C.,-----; 6th S. C.,-----; 4th S. C. Battalion,-----; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Joseph Walker. Brigade loss: k, 59; w, 408; m, 2 469. Pickett's Brigade, Col. Eppa Hunton: 8th Va.,-----; 18th Va.,-----; 19th Va.,-----; 28th Va.,-----; 56th Va.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 209; m, 4 = 234. Evans's Independent Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Nathan G. Evans (on Aug. 30th also in command of Hood's
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
mmissary, and T. C. Shorter, quartermaster. The captains were D. B. Harrell (A), H. L. French (B), F. S. Chapman (C), C. G. Campbell (D), John A. McGregor (E), D. B. Thompson (F), Augustus C. Jones (G), R. E. Kennon (H), C. W. Matthews (I), John H. Pickett (K). The Seventeenth was one of the many regiments that illustrated Georgia so gloriously on the battlefields of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, also at Chickamauga and in east Tennessee. Its colonel, H. L. Benning, became brigadier-general and was succeeded by Lieut.-Col. Wesley C. Hodges, upon whose promotion Charles W. Matthews became lieutenant-colonel, and upon his death in action W. A. Barden succeeded to the vacancy. Maj. Thomas Walker was followed by J. H. Pickett, W. A. Barden and J. B. Morris. Captain Harrell was succeeded by D. H. Wilmot; Chapman by J. B. Moore; Campbell by V. A. S. Parks and J. H. Martin; McGregor by J. N. Tyers; Thompson by H. McCauley and J. H. Weeks; Jones (killed) by A. B. Nichols; Kennon by
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ooted, and left bloody footprints as they made their way through the thorns and briers. The other regiments of the brigade fought creditably under the immediate direction of General Toombs. The Seventeenth lost 101 out of 200 in action. Maj. John H. Pickett, commanding, fell late in the battle, desperately wounded, and hardly had A. C. Jones, next in rank, assumed command, before he was killed by a ball through the temples. Capt. Hiram L. French then took the leadership. Among the wounded s, of the Second, after the fall of Colonel Holmes, though suffering from a painful wound, stood firmly and gallantly by his command during the whole day. Colonel Benning being in command of the brigade, and Lieut.-Col. Wesley C. Hodges and Maj. J. H. Pickett both being absent on account of severe wounds received by them in former battles, Capt. John A. McGregor led the Seventeenth regiment with ability, courage and skill. Major Little led his battalion and the Eleventh Georgia with a dashing c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
attempts to dislodge them until they were ordered to retire next day, following the failure of Pickett's and Pettigrew's charge. The loss was heavy among the best and bravest. Col. John A. Jonesond. They had gained the key to the enemy's whole line, the master position that Pettigrew and Pickett tried in vain to secure on the following day. But as the Georgians looked around they found thaof Captain McCarthy's battery (two Napoleons) were ordered to the left of the line in front of Pickett's division. The fire of the artillery opened about 1 p. m., and for two hours the cannonadiies were opposite the cemetery position of the enemy. The artillery ceased firing as a part of Pickett's division passed over the ground occupied by them in the celebrated charge. During the cannonhe battery fell upon and was at once assumed by First Lieut. C. W. Motes. After the repulse of Pickett, Captain McCarthy and Lieutenant Motes of the Troup artillery were ordered to move forward upon
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
es with heavy loss. Two days later, Sheridan with 10,000 cavalry reinforced Grant, who now rapidly concentrated the main body of his army to the south and west of Petersburg, with the purpose of assailing the Confederate right. Without waiting to be attacked, Lee fell upon the Federals with so heavy a blow that he forced his enemy back. On the same day, March 31st, Sheridan was repulsed near Dinwiddie Court House, but on the next day, reinforced by two corps of infantry, he overwhelmed Pickett's smaller force at Five Forks. On the following morning the Federals attacked all along the line, which was very thin, there being in many places only one man to every seven yards. The gallant defense of Forts Alexander and Gregg checked the Federals until Longstreet came up and interposed his corps. That night Lee withdrew from the lines of Petersburg and Richmond, which he had held so long and skillfully. Lee's retreat was conducted with his usual skill, but the failure to secure suppl
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
f Federal troops who tried to carry that position. At Chancellorsville he was present in command of his battalion of artillery. At Gettysburg he commanded the reserve artillery of Longstreet's corps, and with his battalion prepared the way for Pickett's great charge on the third day of that fateful battle. When Longstreet went to Georgia in September, 1863, Colonel Alexander was with his forces, but did not reach Chickamauga in time to take part in the battle. He acted as chief of artilleryin January, 1863, was commissioned colonel of the Fifteenth Georgia. At Gettysburg, DuBose for the first time led his regiment in battle, under the brigade command of General Benning, in Hood's division. Late in the afternoon of July 3d, after Pickett's immortal but unsuccessful charge, General Law was ordered to withdraw Hood's division from the line it had held at Round Top since the evening of the 2d, to the ridge near the Emmitsburg road, from which it had advanced. McLaws' division reti
Goodlett, John J. Gossett, H. C. Grady, Thomas R. Grogan, W. Pickney Green, Robt.A. Gwyn, Norman P. Henning, James W. Hill, Isaac W. Hirsh, Paschal D. Huff, Wm. A. Hudson, Robert A. Harris, Wm. P. Ingram, Bailis James, Erwin P. Jones, Thomas E. Jones, Tappan C. Kilbourne, Henry C. Markley, John Markley, Robt.McKay, Joseph C. Mills, Willington S. Miller, J. P Miller, John Moor, Edward Moor, Thos. L. Moore, Wm. Morgan, Jas. W. Montgomery, George W. Parkins, J. Daniel Parkins, John Payne, John H. Pickett, Robt. W. Pool, Carter Y. Pool, James M. Price, Green B. Poor, John Poor, James H. Rice, E. F. S. Rowley, W. L. M. A. Scruggs, James S. Shumate, L. R. Smith, Thomas H. Stall, John T. Scott, J. Mims Sullivan, Peter F. Sudduth, W. Butler Thompson, Samuel A Townes, Fred. S. Tracy, W. P. Turpin, John. L. Thornly, Wm. H. Watson, David S Walton, M. L. West, Wm. Whitmire, James O. Yeargin. Musicians.--Stephen F. Long, John U. Roberts, Wm. F. Whisnant, Alex. Whisnant, Thomas Wildman.