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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 284 4 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 217 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 199 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 161 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 89 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 87 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for George E. Pickett or search for George E. Pickett in all documents.

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Hood with his Texans pressed towards that important point, the signal officers folded their flags, and prepared to visit other and less dangerous scenes. At that moment, however, General Warren of the Fifth Corps appeared, and ordered them to keep their signals waving as if a host were immediately behind them, which they did. General E. P. Alexander, the officer referred to as having organized the Rebel Signal Corps, in an article in the Century Magazine for January, 1887, describing Pickett's charge, says that he was particularly cautioned, in moving the artillery, to keep it out of sight of the signal-station upon Round Top. In a foot-note referring to this caution he says:-- This suggests the remark that I have never understood why the enemy abandoned the use of military balloons early in 1863, after having used them extensively up to that time. Even if the observer never saw anything, they would have been worth all they cost, for the annoyance and delays they caused u
-97 Myer, Albert J., 395-96 Nelson, William, 405 Newburg, N. Y., 395 New York Herald, 403; North Cambridge, Mass., 44 Old Capitol Prison, 162 Olustee, Fl., 270 Ord, E. O. C., 264 O'Reilly, Miles, 223 Parke, John G., 260-61 Patrick Station, Va., 351 Pay, 97-99, 215,225 Peace Party, 16 Peach Tree Creek, Ga., 308 Peninsular campaign, 52, 155,198, 303,356-59,378 Perryville, Md., 355 Petersburg, 57-58, 120, 159, 177, 238,286,320,350,381,393,403 Pickett, George E., 407 Pine Mountain, Ga., 404 Pittsfield, Mass., 44 Pleasant Valley, Md., 346 Poems: The Army Bean, 137-38; The Army mule in time of peace, 297; The charge of the mule brigade, 295-97; The substitute, 216; The sweet little man, 26-28; We've drank from the same canteen, 223-24 Point of Rocks, Va., 392 Polk, Leonidas, 404 Pontoons, 381-91 Poolesville, Md., 244,404 Pope, John, 37, 71 Poplar Grove, Va., 393 Port Gibson, Miss., 370 Prentiss, Benjamin M., 301 P