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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 284 4 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 217 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 199 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 161 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 89 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 87 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George E. Pickett or search for George E. Pickett in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
stood upon the upper portion of the site now occupied by our imposing City Hall. Among the leading officers who participated in the meeting were Generals Early, John B. Gordon, Edward Johnson, I. R. Trimble, W. B. Taliaferro, William Smith, W. N. Pendleton, Fitz. Lee, M. Ransom, William Terry, Benjamin Huger, Robert Ransom, L. L. Lomax, George H. Steuart, C. W. Field, W. S. Walker, B. T. Johnson, J. D. Imboden, R. L. Walker, Harry Heth, Samuel Jones, John S. Preston, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rank and file. The meeti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
enuine and vociferous. Veterans in line. The veterans of R. E. Lee Camp, No. I, and George E. Pickett Camp, Confederate Veterans, were given the post of honor. These bodies met at their res commanding, composed of 15th, 17th, 30th and 32d regiments, General M. D. Corse commanding. Pickett-Buchanan Camp of Norfolk, Commander Samuel Hodges, 250 men. Stonewall Camp of Portsmouth, 12ebster, D. N. Walker, Charles Watkins, M. West, Robert Wood, John H. Weymouth, Jud. B. Wood. Pickett's men. There were several genuine old Confederate uniforms worn, but not as many anywhere else as among Pickett's men, who came next and made a long procession of themselves, Colonel F. H. Langley commanding. They carried the First regiment flag which was first used at Blackburns Ford; theifty thousand meals were dispensed by the two camps of Confederate veterans of the city—Lee and Pickett. So bountiful was the provision made that a large quantity of supplies remained unused. These
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), At Lee's tomb. (search)
ntry snows and the frozen rivers—anything to relieve himself from the imputation of the want of foresight or provision for unexpected dangers. At Waterloo it was not he that failed in his strategy, but Marshal Ney that failed in the execution. In this respect General Lee was exactly his opposite. If he suffered a disaster he never sought to evade responsibility by placing it upon others. Even in the greatest reverse of his life, the defeat at Gettysburg, when he saw the famous charge of Pickett melt away under the terrible fire that swept the field, till the ranks were literally torn to pieces by shot and shell, he did not vent his despair in rage and reproaches, but rushing to the front took the blame upon himself, saying: It is all my fault. Perhaps no incident of his life showed more the nobility of his nature. When the war was over General Lee had left to him at Lexington about the same number of years that Napoleon had at St. Helena, and if he had had the same desire to p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Itinerary of the Fourth Virginia cavalry. March 27th-April 9th, 1865. (search)
the night at Sutherland's Tavern. Wednesday, March 29th. Laid in line of battle near Hatcher's creek, Payne's Brigade fighting, we supporting him; camped for the night near Hatcher's creek. Thursday, March 30th. Moved towards Five Forks; Pickett's division and cavalry drove enemy back. While driving him back night overtook us; we came back a short distance and went into camp. Friday, March 31st. Attacked by enemy next morning. Pickett's division and cavalry driven by enemy at FivePickett's division and cavalry driven by enemy at Five Forks; camped for the night at——Station on Southside Railroad. Saturday, April 1st. Enemy pressing us all day, especially in the afternoon; succeeded in checking him at Mulberry Inn, near the line of Amelia and Dinwiddie counties; remained in breastworks here all night. Enemy charged in several times—repulsed. Sunday, April 2d. We left about daybreak; went three or four miles and remained until about 10 o'clock A. M. Enemy appeared, drove in picket, closely pressed us to Bevil's bridg<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] (search)
The unveiling. [Richmond Dispatch, June 10, 1890.] Petersburg, June 9th, 1890. At an early hour in the afternoon crowds began to wend their way to the cemetery, all bearing flowers and evergreens with which to decorate the graves of the soldiers. The procession was one of the finest ever seen in Petersburg. It was composed of A. P. Hill Camp of veterans, Pickett-Buchanan Camp of Norfolk, R. E. Lee Camp and Sons of Confederate Veterans of Richmond, the Prince George Cavalry, Petersburg Grays, Petersburg Artillery with full battery of guns, the Fire Department with engines beautifully decorated, civil societies, and a long line of citizens. The line was headed by Chief-Marshal Henry and his associates, the ladies of the Memorial Association and the orator of the day, with the Mayor and Miss Hill. It was fully half-past 6 o'clock before the ceremonies commenced in the cemetery, where fully 10,000 people had assembled around the monument and the stand. The scene was an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Casualties in the old First at Gettysburg: two out of every three men who were carried into the charge shot down. (search)
Casualties in the old First at Gettysburg: two out of every three men who were carried into the charge shot down. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Will you kindly publish the following in justice to the old First regiment of Virginia infantry? I presume the fact that the official report of Pickett's division at the battle of Gettysburg was suppressed at the request of General Lee is well known. In the absence of such report many statements, more or less unjust to the division, have been made, all which have come to my knowledge, I have deemed it unnecessary to notice until I read the following report in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Serial No. 44, pages 330, published under the auspices of the Government: Record of Killed and Wounded at Gettysburg.—First Virginia regiment: Killed, 2; wounded, 62. Whether or not there was intentional misrepresentation in this report I deem it but just to give the true record, giving the names of the kill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
onel R. B, 76. North Carolina Troops at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 269. Nullification, 93. Old Dominion Guard from La., 54. Osterhaus, General, 73. Otey Battery Association, Roster of, 280. Palmer, D. D., Rev. B. M. 355. Parker's Battery, Roster of, 282. Pedregal, Battle of, 318, 363. Pegram's Battalion Association, Roster of, 278. Perry, General E. A., Death of, 61. Petersburg, Va., 14; Seige of, 331; Soldiers' Monument at, Unveiling of etc., 388. Pickett's Division at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 280. Population of the United States-relative increase of the white and black races, 25. Porcher, A. B., M. D., F. Peyre, 12. Porter, Admiral D. D., 349. Prisoner's Guard Reversed, The, 172. Prisoners of War, Humanity of the Confederate Government to, 119, 378. Race Problems, The, 21. Rains, General, Geo. W., 72. Randolph, Bishop A. M., 352. Reagan, Hon. J. H., 349. Rebellions, 6. Revolution, The High Spirit of the,