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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 284 4 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 217 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 199 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 161 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 117 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 89 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 87 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George E. Pickett or search for George E. Pickett in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
es set in rose gardens; from Craig Creek, and Back Creek, and Mill Creek, and Jennings Creek; from Roaring Run and North Mountain; from Fincastle, Amsterdam and Buchanan; from every nook and corner, twelve full companies to the service of Virginia and the South. The greater number of these, during the four years of the war, fought within the bounds of their mother state. They fought at Manassas and at Seven Pines, at Chancellorsville, and on many another stricken field. They charged with Pickett at Gettysburg. They surrendered with Lee at Appomattox. Others of these Botetourt men, fought, as the saying is, all over. Like Sir Philip Sidney, when they heard of a good war they went to it. They fought in Virginia, in Kentucky, in Tennessee, the Carolinas, Georgia and Mississippi. The command known first as the Mountain Rifles, then as Anderson's Battery, and then as the Botetourt Artillery, fought all over. On the banks of the James, a few miles from Fincastle, lies the village
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
ricksburg. Secrecy was a strong element in his character as a soldier. Third. His stern discipline was another important element in Jackson's character as a soldier. He put General Garnett under arrest at Kernstown for ordering a retreat of his brigade when they were out of ammunition, and almost surrounded, saying, He ought to have held his position with the bayonet. Garnett was still under arrest when Jackson died, when General Lee released him, and put him in command of one of Pickett's Brigades, the gallant gentleman being killed in the charge at Gettysburg, while leading his men. On the Valley campaign I chanced to witness a scene in which Jackson rode up to a gallant colonel, commanding a brigade, and said: Colonel, the orders were for you to move in the rear of General to-day. The colonel replied in a rather rollicking tone: Yes, I knew that General, but my fellows were ready to march, and General——was not, and I thought that it would make no difference which
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
ms into defeat. Evidently it was the guiding hand of the great unseen Architect of Nations who brought the Monitor into the waters of the Chesapeake to grapple in deadly conflict with the Merrimac for the supremacy of the seas. And we concede that it was He who delayed Ewell's coming until the heights of Gettysburg were crowned with the Federal Army under General Meade, and thus pitted the impregnable mountains against the fierce assaults of the cohorts of Lee under the gallant and daring Pickett. It was never intended by the Divine Hand that this nation as a nation should perish from the earth. On the contrary, cemented by the blood of its bravest and best, it was foreordained that it should continue to live, to bless and guide the nations of the earth. And I have no doubt that the time will come when this great republic as a nation will feel proud of the courage and achievements of the Southern soldier, and will revere the names of Lee and Jackson as it now reveres the names o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
of 1861 the 8th Virginia Regiment was assigned to the brigade. The brigade commanders were: First brigadie-general, Philip St. G. Cocke; second brigadier-general, George E. Pickett; third brigadier-general, Richard B. Garnett. He was killed July 5, 1863, at Gettysburg. Fourth and last brigadier-general, Eppa Hunton, to the close of the war. The brigade belonged to Pickett's Division. Peyton, Charles S., captain, wounded in Second Manassas battle, August 30, 1862; left arm amputated; promoted major September 14, 1862; wounded in left leg July 3, 1863, in battle of Gettysburg. Major Peyton was the only field officer left in the brigade-Garnett's—which he took command of and brought off the field. He was the only officer of Pickett's Division who made a report of this battle. He was promoted lieutenant-colonel early in the fall of 1863, and assigned to post duty and served to the close of the war. Pritchett, William R., first lieutenant; promoted captain in the fall of 186
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.69 (search)
G, twenty-fourth Virginia Infantry. From the Times-dispatch, June 17, 1901. A list of its members and a brief history of them. Following is the muster-roll of Company G, 24th Regiment, Virginia Infantry, William R. Terry's Brigade, General Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps: Winton Absheir, died in hospital, 1862. Raleigh T. Austin, killed September 30, 1864, at Drewry's Bluff. David M. Alvis, died at home, 1897. Isaac Alvis, killed at Williamsburg, Va. Ed. Bailey, up in Mercer County, Va. (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the 24th Virginia Regiment throughout the war, and belonged to the First Brigade of the First Division, commanded by General George E. Pickett, of Longstreet's Corps. The brigade was commanded by various brigadier-generals, as follows: J. A. Early, S. P. Garland, J. L. Kemper, and W. R. (Buck) Terry. The company participated in several battles, and lost from death in bat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
eds performed on hopeless field of Battle—had Pickett been there—The sad story of five Forks told fun to Five Forks; was wounded and captured in Pickett's charge at Gettysburg; was a well-trained ofs. The esprit du corps, so characteristic of Pickett's Division, marked it as a body of men of whits. The division was at once halted, and General Pickett rode up to me (my regiment was next to thve the enemy from the ford in our front. General Pickett said he would accompany him; that there w I halted them, and told General Rosser of Pickett's orders, that no troops should pass the headloped to the front. Just then a courier from Pickett summoned me down. I transmitted my orders orts of rumors were afloat. At that time General Pickett was absent and no one seemed to know wher our left, was appealing for aid, but that in Pickett's absence no one would assume the responsibilble, and, expecting every moment the whole of Pickett's Division to my relief. Getting out of a [2 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover Grays. (search)
Hanover Grays. A Roll of this gallant Organization—a long death list. The following is the roll of Company I, 15th Virginia Volunteers Infantry (Hanover Grays), Corse's Brigade, Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. This company was organized at Old Church, Hanover County, Va., in December of 1859, and mustered into the service of the Confederate States at Richmond, Va., April 23, 1861, and continued in service until the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, in April, 1865. Captain, B. W. Talley, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. First Lieutenant, Thaddeus Foster, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. Second Lieutenant, William Boyd, served from April 23, 1861, to April, 1862; now dead. Captain James D. Waid, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865. First Lieutenant, George P. Haw, served from April 23, 1862, to 1865; lost an arm. Second Lieutenant, John W. Davidson, served from April 23, 1862, to