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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
G. to E. M. Davis; cf. ante, 2.426. to treat of the assumed judgments upon Sabbath-breakers. But he could not command the necessary collaboration, and his scheme was very imperfectly carried out. Three sets of resolutions were introduced, and furnished Lib. 18.50, 51. matter for debate—the longest by Mr. Garrison, others by John W. Browne A lawyer, originally of Salem, Mass., at this time of Boston; a classmate and most intimate friend at Harvard of Charles Sumner (Lib. 30: 71, 90, 91; Pierce's Life of Sumner, 2: 294). and Theodore Parker; with supplementary ones by Charles K. Whipple. George W. Benson presided over the two days session in the Melodeon—an ill-lighted hall used on week-days for secular entertainments, and on Sundays by Mr. Parker's congregation as their meeting-house. The orthodox religious press, as represented by the Boston Recorder, voted Charles C. Burleigh the ablest speaker, yet added: The most influential speaker, whose dictates, whether opposed or not, sw
against it cannot but subside. Lib. 21.125; ante, p. 274. And John Van Buren, taking the stump with Henry B. Stanton and Lib. 22.101, 161. Isaiah Rynders for Frank Pierce in 1852, echoed the sentiment that the need of the Free Soil Party, from Lib. 22.157. which he had ratted, ceased with the passage of the Compromise. The sies in the land, and they stand committed to the side of slavery, nakedly, openly, Lib. 22.94, 102. impudently, and, as they say, everlastingly! Both Scott and Pierce have agreed to uphold all that was done by the Winfield Scott. Frank Pierce. Baltimore Conventions, relating to slavery; so that, by no casuistry whatever can aFrank Pierce. Baltimore Conventions, relating to slavery; so that, by no casuistry whatever can a vote cast for either of them be anything else than a direct sanction to slaveholding, slave-breeding, and slave-hunting. None but those who are morally depraved or blind can give such a vote. As Webster, at the Whig Convention, received only a contemptible minority of votes (the largest third from Massachusetts, and not one
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
deliberately, cautiously, and (as the almost success proved) most judiciously (Ms. June 28, 1854, T. W. Higginson to W. L. G.). made upon the Lib. 28.43. Court house, ending in repulse and in the death of one of the deputy marshals; how President Pierce and the Mayor J. V. C. Smith. of Boston concentrated all the military within reach to prevent a second attempt and enforce the decision of the court; how Commissioner Loring yielded up the victim Edward Greely Loring. to his master; and ho of time. These pessimistic forebodings had a solid substratum in the signs of the times. Never was the Slave Power more insolent in its consciousness of strength, or wilder in its delirium of empire. See, for the undisguised purpose of President Pierce's Administration to annex Cuba, Lib. 24: 85, 127, 130, 189, 194; and, for the ancillary intrigue to acquire Samana Bay in San Domingo—a menace also to the independence and liberty of Hayti— Lib. 24: 157, 159; 25: 1, 61. Lieut. Herndon's expl
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
us-voting population, and elected a legislature which purged itself of Lib. 25.123. every free-State delegate, removed the capital nearer the Lib. 25.123. Missouri border, adopted the slave code of that State, and Lib. 25.133, 134, 139, 143, 146; 26.49. in other ways completed what Governor Reeder himself rightly called the subjugation of Kansas. Powerless to Lib. 25.71. rectify the doings of this bogus body, for what he did do Lib. 25.67, 123. honestly the Governor was removed by President Pierce Lib. 25.131. and succeeded by Wilson Shannon, who acknowledged the Lib. 25.146. legality of the Legislature, and put himself openly at the Lib. 25.191, 193, 201. head of the invaders, assuring them of the firm support of the Administration at Washington. Every difference growing out of the unsettled state of society in a new country—and disputes over titles to the land were inevitable— was liable to array free-State men against slave-State, and to end in bloodshed. The first homici
Hill of that Revolution. Between these events, of the first political importance, occurred the beating of Charles Sumner in his seat in the Senate Chamber May 22, 1856; Lib. 26.87. of the United States by the nephew of one of his colleagues, a Representative from South Carolina, Preston S. Brooks. The speech which drew down upon the Massachusetts Senator this murderous assault, was entitled The Crime against Kansas; and the assault itself was merely a part of that crime. Jefferson Davis, Pierce's Secretary of War, wielding all the power of the Lib. 26:[30], [151]. Administration in support of the pro-slavery invaders of Kansas, publicly approved Brooks's action. Senator Douglas, the Lib. 26.173. arch-contriver of the Kansas iniquity, witnessed without emotion and without interfering (lest his motives might be misconstrued Lib. 26.91, 103.) the plying of the dragoon strokes which Brooks had learnt in the Mexican War; and Lib. 26.87. afterwards took the stump with the South Carol
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 18: the irrepressible Conflict.—1858. (search)
elves and the Garrisonians—said the question of disunion would arise if an Abolitionist be chosen President of the United States. He entreated Mississippi to make ready for the contest, and alter over its old arms. He reported having heard President Pierce say that when a Northern army should go to subjugate the South, its first fighting would be done on Northern soil. Compare a like warning on the part of Pierce's Attorney-General, Caleb Cushing, in Faneuil Hall, Dec. 9, 1859, in case his Pierce's Attorney-General, Caleb Cushing, in Faneuil Hall, Dec. 9, 1859, in case his fellow-citizens of Massachusetts embarked in a war of invasion [of the South] for the destruction of the Union and the Government of the Union (Lib. 29: 197). Davis took for his text the famous speech of Senator Seward at Rochester, N. Y., on October 25, 1858; in which Lib. 28.177. the latter foretold the supplanting of the Democratic Party in power by the Republican, and gave universal currency in a happy phrase to the old abolition view of Ante, 2.338. the existing Union: Shall I t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
. A gallant son of the South, Jefferson Davis, led our forces into Mexico, and, thank God! he still lives, perhaps to lead a Southern army. Lib. 30.9. Davis, in spite of his having repeatedly pledged Ante, p. 469; himself to disunion in case of Republican success, was the Lib. 30.17. favorite standard-bearer in 1860 with the more besotted Democrats of the North. And even as Singleton was nominating him commander-in-chief of a Confederate army, Davis was reading a letter from ex-President Pierce, Jan. 6, 1860. marking him as the coming man for the national Democratic nomination, and confirming the writer's old assurance that a civil war would not rage solely on the border: Ante, p. 469. Without, said the ex-President, discussing the question of right—of abstract power to secede, I have never believed that actual disruption of the Union can occur without blood. And if, through the madness of Northern abolitionism, that dire calamity must come, the fighting will not be a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
a.,June 27, 1862. Phillips, Charles C.,26th Mass. Inf.,Winchester, Va.,Sept. 19, 1864. Phinney, William P. Name and rank. Private understood when not otherwise stated.Command.Engagement.Date. Phinney, William P., 2d Lieut.,24th Mass. Inf.,Deep Run, Va.,Aug. 16, 1864. Phipps, Charles W.,24th Mass. Inf.,Deep Run, Va.,Aug. 16, 1864. Phipps, William A.,34th Mass. Inf.,Stickney's Farm, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Pickering, Juba F.,21st Mass. Inf.,Camden, N. C.,April 19, 1862. Pierce, Frank, Corp.23d Mass. Inf.,Whitehall, N. C.,Dec. 16, 1862. Pierce, James H., Jr.,11th Mass. Inf.,Williamsburg, Va.,May 5, 1862. Pierce, Jerome, Corp.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Pierce, John D.,25th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 19, 1864. Pierce, Samuel,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Pierce, Sidney C.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Pierce, Wheaton,40th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va.,June 6, 1864. Pike, Caleb C.,35th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Se
Phinney, William P. Name and rank. Private understood when not otherwise stated.Command.Engagement.Date. Phinney, William P., 2d Lieut.,24th Mass. Inf.,Deep Run, Va.,Aug. 16, 1864. Phipps, Charles W.,24th Mass. Inf.,Deep Run, Va.,Aug. 16, 1864. Phipps, William A.,34th Mass. Inf.,Stickney's Farm, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Pickering, Juba F.,21st Mass. Inf.,Camden, N. C.,April 19, 1862. Pierce, Frank, Corp.23d Mass. Inf.,Whitehall, N. C.,Dec. 16, 1862. Pierce, James H., Jr.,11th Mass. Inf.,Williamsburg, Va.,May 5, 1862. Pierce, Jerome, Corp.,36th Mass. Inf.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 12, 1864. Pierce, John D.,25th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,June 19, 1864. Pierce, Samuel,18th Mass. Inf.,Manassas, Va.,Aug. 30, 1862. Pierce, Sidney C.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Pierce, Wheaton,40th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va.,June 6, 1864. Pike, Caleb C.,35th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Pike, Robert P.,19th Mass. Inf.,Hatcher's Run, Va.,Feb. 5, 1865. Pike, Will
ps, L. W., 542 Phillips, M. E., 542 Phillips, W. N., 494 Phillips, Wendell, 135 Phinney, G. F., 438 Phinney, W. P., 406 Phipps, C. W., 406 Phipps, H. B., 542 Phipps, Lyman, 542 Phipps, M. M., 542 Phipps, W. A., 406 Phisterer, Frederick, VI, 40, 52 Pickering, J. F., 406 Pickering, John, 19, 244 Pickering, John, Jr., 116 Pickett, G. E., 101, 102, 230, 232 Pickett, Josiah, 46, 49, 121, 126, 242 Pierce, C. H., 494 Pierce, E. L., 87 Pierce, E. W., 474 Pierce, Eli, 542 Pierce, Frank, 406 Pierce, H. L., 81 Pierce, Harrison, 438 Pierce, J. D., 25th Mass. Inf., 406 Pierce, J. D., 56th Mass. Inf., 474 Pierce, J. H., Jr., 406 Pierce, Jerome, 406 Pierce, John, 474 Pierce, S. C., 406 Pierce, Samuel, 406 Pierce, Wheaton, 406 Pierson, G. H., 151, 204 Pierson, H. J., 474 Pierson, J. H., 474 Pike, C. C., 406 Pike, Eli, 474 Pike, R. P., 406 Pike, W. H., 474 Pike, William, 406 Pilkerton, John, 542 Pillsbury, W. M., 474 Pine, Daniel, 542 Pinseno (or Pinsen
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