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Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville. (search)
and Wilson sold to Francis Grissell, or Griswold. John Green removed, with his family, probably to Malden. John Woolrych, 1635, had a dwelling house and six acres of land at Strawberry Hill. He died prior to 1647, and his widow married William Ayer, who sold the premises to Richard Wilson. Neither Woolrych nor Aver left offspring here. John Sibley, 1635, had a dwelling house and land at Strawberry Hill. A daughter, and probably only child, married twice, but not in Somerville. Thomas Pierce, 1636. His dwelling house was at the West End. Descendants of the name may not be here now, but posterity is here, as descendants of his daughter Mary, who married Peter Tufts. William Bachelder, 1636. He had a dwelling house and four acres of land in the Highfield, near what is now the corner of Broadway and Winthrop Avenue. He may have moved into the peninsula; certainly none of his children remained here. His daughter Abigail married Richard Austin, and they were the progenitors
years 1645 and '50, and that he continued to increase his holdings at short intervals till his death in 1700, at which time he was the largest landholder in Maiden. He appears not to have owned much, if any, land within the present limits of Somerville. He lived at one time near the Everett spring in Everett, but latterly on the site of the United States Ordnance property, near the Malden river and canal. Here he died, and near-by he lies buried. Peter Tufts married the daughter of Thomas Pierce, of Charlestown, and had a large family of children. His four sons were Captain Peter, of Medford and Malden; James, who was killed in early life with Lothrop in the ambuscade at Bloody Brook in 1675; Jonathan, of Medford; and John, of Charlestown and Malden. The youngest son, John, was the only one identified with Somerville. It does not appear that John, himself, lived within our limits, but he bought large tracts of land here on which he established his sons, Nathaniel and Peter.
—31. Pepper, Edward K., IV.—31. Perkins, Colonel, Thomas Handyside, IV.—16. Perkins Family, The, II.—14. Perkins House, Medford Turnpike, II.—14. Perkins-street Church, III.—17. Perry, Elizabeth, II.—23. Petersburg, Va., I.—39; II.—38; IV.—28. Pierce, Abigail, I.—23. Pierce Academy, II.—29. Pierce, Elizabeth (wife of Ebenezer Smith), L—24. Pierce, James, I.—23. Pierce, Mary, wife of Nathaniel Tufts, I.—24. Pierce, Mary, wife of John Stone, I.—24. Pierce, Thomas, II.—29. Pierson, Colonel George H., IV.—24. Pierson, Rev. William H., I.—11, 14. Pierson, Rev. William H., Address by, I.—19. Pillsbury, L. B., I.—13. Ploughed Hill, II.—10. Point of Rocks, I.—36. Pope, General, I.—36. Pope, General, Army of, III.—24. Po River, I.—38. Port Hudson, siege of, IV.—30. Portland, Me., I.—34. Portsmouth, N. H., I.—7. Potomac River, I.—36; IV.—25. Powder House, II.
Robert E. Lee and other vessels violating the blockade, have arrived at New York--twenty-eight in irons. Among the prisoners of special importance was C. E. Stewart, Beigian Consul; H. H. Webber and H. W. Rooke, British army officers, and Capt. Thomas Pierce, of the Ordnance Department, C. E. army. Mr. Stewart had with him his consular credentials, and was promptly discharged. Messrs Webber and Rooke had with them their commissions as officers of the British army, and were also at once disch--twenty-eight in irons. Among the prisoners of special importance was C. E. Stewart, Beigian Consul; H. H. Webber and H. W. Rooke, British army officers, and Capt. Thomas Pierce, of the Ordnance Department, C. E. army. Mr. Stewart had with him his consular credentials, and was promptly discharged. Messrs Webber and Rooke had with them their commissions as officers of the British army, and were also at once discharged. Capt. Pierce is a Virginian, and will probably be paroled for exchange.