Your search returned 83 results in 36 document sections:

1 2 3 4
a disciplinarian, full of energy, and a charming gentleman, his Twentieth Indiana must miss him. The country loses in him one who promised to fill worthily high trusts. The Third Michigan, ever faithful to their name, under Col. Champlin and Major Pierce, lose one hundred and forty out of two hundred and sixty combatants. Col. Champlin is again disabled. The staunch Fourth Maine, under Walker and Carver, true men, of a rare type, drove on through the stream of battle irresistibly. The One Harrington, Jacob Emrick, Acting Sergt. Major Jas. Gaston, Geo. Parmer. Wounded of company A, in hospitals at Richmond, Ky.: George Anderson, in leg; Manoah Ratliff, in leg; Peter Kirn, in both legs; Oliver Edwards, in elbow. Deserters — William Pierce and Robert Conner left their company and regiment on the twentieth day of August, and have not since been heard from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a
er. The Sixty-third Pennsylvania and Fortieth New-York volunteers, under the brave Colonel Egan, suffered the most. The gallant Hays is badly wounded. The loss of officers has been great; that of Col. Brown can hardly be replaced. Brave, skilful, a disciplinarian, full of energy, and a charming gentleman, his Twentieth Indiana must miss him. The country loses in him one who promised to fill worthily high trusts. The Third Michigan, ever faithful to their name, under Col. Champlin and Major Pierce, lose one hundred and forty out of two hundred and sixty combatants. Col. Champlin is again disabled. The staunch Fourth Maine, under Walker and Carver, true men, of a rare type, drove on through the stream of battle irresistibly. The One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania volunteers were not wanting. They are Pennsylvanians — mountain men — again have they been fearfully decimated. The desperate charge of these regiments sustains the past history of this division. The lists of killed
etzger, John Carrington, John S. Thornton, Isaac W. Baldwin, Jno. Rhoads, Wm. F. Price, Allen Stubbs, Wm. Preston, Ancil Dwoggins, Wm. J. H. Clark, Thos. Hudson, Albert Murdock, Corporal Chas. Fulghum, Sergt. Andrew J. McDowell, Geo. Jones, Addison Harrington, Jacob Emrick, Acting Sergt. Major Jas. Gaston, Geo. Parmer. Wounded of company A, in hospitals at Richmond, Ky.: George Anderson, in leg; Manoah Ratliff, in leg; Peter Kirn, in both legs; Oliver Edwards, in elbow. Deserters — William Pierce and Robert Conner left their company and regiment on the twentieth day of August, and have not since been heard from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a report of company F, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers: List of paroled prisoners.--Capt. Lewis K. Harris, First Lieut. Jos. Jackson, Second Lieut. George Thompson, First Sergt. Oliver S. Plummer, Second Sergt. William Reeves, Third Serg
n lecture-day. What a transition,--from the altar of God the bare back! This was teaching Puritan individualism with a vengeance. The custom of whipping did not cease in Medford till 1790! Slavery. Our fathers held slaves in Medford. There are persons now living among us who remember slaves in their family. They were treated, generally, much after the manner of children. Africans were brought to this colony and sold among us, for the first time, Feb. 26, 1638. In 1637, Captain William Pierce was employed to carry Pequot captives and sell them in the West Indies! On his return from Tortugas, he brought home a cargo of cotton, tobacco, salt, and negroes ! Slavery was thus introduced as early as 1638; but, in 1645, the General Court passed this noble, this truly Christian, order:-- The General Court, conceiving themselves bound by the first opportunity to bear witness against the heinous and crying sin of man-stealing, as also to prescribe such timely redress for what i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A grand meeting in New Orleans on the 25th of April in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
. E. Huger, J. H. Oglesby, Warren Stone, E. M. Hudson, E. K. Converse, A. Goldthwaite, H. L. Lazarus, G. W. Cable, I. L. Leucht, F. R. Southmayd, Columbus H. Allen, H. D. Ogden, J. C. Morris, H. B. Stevens, W. J. Behon, R. B. Pleasants, Thos. R. Markham, John V. Moore, J. H. Maury, T. S. Kennedy, J. H. Wiendahl, I. L. Lyons, E. A. Burke, S. H. Boyd, J. W. Emmett, Chas. Macready, Thos. C. Herndon, H. A. Martin, J. C. Denis, S. H. Buck, J. Walker Coleman; T. F. Alleyn, Wm. Fagan, F. McGloin, Wm. Pierce, J. T. Harahan, John Fitzpatrick, A. Moulton, John Glynn Jr., M. D. Lagan, Adam Thompson, Archibald Mitchell, John Mc. Enery, A. J. Lewis, John G. Devereux, J. M. Bonner, J. D. Peet, R. W. Adams, Eugene May, A. A. Maginnis, Rev. Mr. Waters, A. W. Hyatt, H. Miller Thompson, J. B. Walton, B. T. Walshe, John Augustin, C. H. Tebault C. J. Leeds, R. H. Marr, P. N. Strong, Gideon Townsend, H. Abraham, J. I. Block, T. G. Richardson, H. M. Martin, Percy Roberts, J. D. Hill, Edw'd Villere, Rt. Rev.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Almanacs, American. (search)
Almanacs, American. No copy is known to exist of the almanac of 1639. the first published in America. calculated for New England by William Pierce, mariner; another, the Boston almanac, by John Foster, 1676. William Bradford at Philadelphia published an almanac of twenty pages, 1685. commonly received as the first almanac published in the colonies; a copy from the Brinley library sold in New York, March, 1882, for $555.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Montgomery, 1813-1883 (search)
Blair, Montgomery, 1813-1883 Statesman; born in Franklin county, Ky., May 10, 1813; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1836, and served a while in the 2d Artillery in Florida, against the Seminole Indians. He resigned in 1836; became a practising lawyer in st. Louis, Mo., in 1837; from 1839 to 1843 was United States district attorney for the district of Missouri, and was judge of the St. Louis Court of Common Pleas from 1843 to 1849. In 1842 he was mayor of St. Louis. President Pierce appointed him solicitor to the United States Court of Claims in 1855, but, becoming a Republican, President Buchanan removed him. Mr. Blair was counsel for the plaintiffs in the famous Dred Scott case (q. v.). He was appointed Postmaster-General in March, 1861, and served about three years. He died in Silver Spring, Md., July 27, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boydton plank road, battle of. (search)
lock the Confederate line was struck, but it was not broken. Warren's corps made its way to the west of hatcher's Run to gain the Confederate rear. Crawford's division got entangled and broken in an almost impassable swamp. An attempt of a part of Howard's corps to form a junction with Crawford's troops was defeated by the tangled swamp. These movements had been eagerly watched by the Confederates. Heth was sent by Hill to strike Hancock. It was done at 4 P. M. The blow first fell upon Pierce's brigade, and it gave way, leaving two guns behind. The Confederates were pursuing, when they, in turn, were struck by the Nationals, driven back, and the two guns recaptured. Fully 1,000 Confederates were made prisoners. Others, in their flight, rushed into Crawford's lines, and 200 of them were made prisoners. Meanwhile Hancock had been sorely pressed on his left and rear by five brigades under Wade Hampton. Gregg fought them, and with infantry supports maintained his ground until d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Breckinridge, John Cabell, -1875 (search)
Breckinridge, John Cabell, -1875 Statesman; born near Lexington, Ky., Jan. 21, John Cabell Breckinridge. 1821. Studying law at the Transylvania Institute, he began its practice at Lexington. He served as major in the war with Mexico; was a member of his State legislature; and from 1851 to 1855 was in Congress. President Pierce tendered him the mission to Spain, which he declined. In March, 1857, he became Vice-President, under Buchanan, and succeeded John J. Crittenden in the Senate of the United States in 1861. He was then a defeated candidate for the Presidency. His friendship for the Confederates caused his expulsion from the Senate in December, 1861, when he joined the Confederate army and was made a major-general, Aug. 5, 1862. He was active at various points during the remainder of the war. Breckinridge was Secretary of War of the Confederacy when it fell (1865), and soon afterwards departed for Europe, returning to his native State in a short time. He was the youn
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buchanan, James, (search)
ed he took sides with the Democrats. He supported Jackson for the Presidency in 1828, when the present Democratic party was organized. In 1832-34, Mr. Buchanan was United States minister at St. Petersburg, and from 1834 to 1845 was a member of the United States Senate. He was Secretary of State in the cabinet of President Polk, 1845-49. where he arrived himself on the side of the pro-slavery men, opposing the Wilmot proviso (q. v.), and the anti-slavery movements generally. In 1853 President Pierce sent him as United States minister to England, where he remained until 1856), during which time he became a party in the conference of United States ministers at Ostend, and was a signer of the famous manifesto, or consular letter (see Ostend manifesto). In the fall of 1856 he was elected President of the United States, receiving 174 electoral votes to 129 given for Fremont (Republican) and Fillmore (American). A chief topic of President Buchanan's inaugural address was the decision
1 2 3 4