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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
e light draughts who have carried out my orders ders promptly, aided in keeping guerillas from the river, convoyed transports safely, and kept their vessels in good condition for service, viz: Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George W. Brown, commanding Forest Rose; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant C. Dominey, commanding Signal; Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant J. H. Hurd, commanding Covington; Ensign Win. C. Hanford, commanding Robb; Acting-Master J. C. Bunner, commanding New Era; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant John Pierce, commanding Petrel; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone, commanding Romeo; Acting-Master W. E. Fentress, commanding Rattler; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant T. E. Smith, commanding Linden; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. C. Brennan, commanding Prairie Bird; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. Goudy, commanding Queen City. There are others who deserve commendation, but these seem to be the most prominent. The action of the 4th of July, at Helena, wherein the Taylor participated so l
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
C. Dominey (1863); Acting-Ensign W. P. Lee (1864). Steamer Covington.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant.--* J. S. Hurd (1863); Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant George P. Lord (1864). Steamer Robb.--* Ensign W. C. Handford; Acting-Ensign Lloyd Thomas (1864). Steamer New Era.--* Acting-Master J. C. Brenner; Acting-Master John Marshall (1864). Steamer Romeo.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. V. Johnstone; Acting-Master Thomas Baldwin (1864). Steamer Petrel.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant * John Pierce; Acting-Master Thomas McElroy (1864). Steamer Linden.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant *T. E. Smith; Acting-Master T. M. Farrell (1864). Steamer Prairie Bird.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant *E. C. Brennard (1863); Acting-Ensign J. W. Chambers (1864). Steamer Queen City.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant * J. Goudy (1863); Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant G. W. Brown (1864). Steamer Sybil.--Lieutenant-Commander J. G. Mitchell (1865). Steamer Neosho.--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Samuel Howar
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ads with rifled guns are too strong for our walls of stone, brick and mortar. Note.--As the Tennessee was the most powerful and remarkable vessel the Confederates ever built, the scientific reader may take some interest in the following description of her construction, from the report of a Board of Survey, ordered by Admiral Farragut, after the battle: Description of the Confederate iron-clad Tennessee. The vessel had been built at Mobile, Alabama, under the superintendence of Messrs. Pierce and Bassett, naval constructors, and Mr. Frick, chief engineer of the station. Hull. The hull of the vessel was very strongly built in every part, the materials being oak and yellow pine, with iron fastenings. Length from stem to stern on deck, 209 feet; greatest breadth of beam on deck, 48 feet; mean average draught of water about 14 feet. The deck was covered fore and aft with wroughtiron plates, two inches thick. The sides of the vessel were protected by an over-hang, sponso