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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ransom M. Pierce or search for Ransom M. Pierce in all documents.

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nt; Howard B. Utter, Drum-Major; Chas. C. Fleming, Assistant-Adjutant. Company A--David A. Nevins, Captain; Peter L. Van Ness, First Lieutenant; Chas. L. Jones, Ensign. Company B--Jas. M. Pomeroy, Captain; Watson Hopkins, First Lieutenant; Geo. B. Eastman, Ensign. Company C--Frank Palmer, Captain; Royal Corbin, First Lieutenant; Pliny Moore, Ensign. Company D--Geo. Parker, Captain; Albert M. Barney, First Lieutenant; Robert P. Wilson, Ensign. Company E--John L. Stetson, Captain; Ransom M. Pierce, First Lieutenant; Charles H. Bently, Ensign. Company F--John C. Gilmore, Captain; John A. Vance, First Lieutenant; Jos. Holbrook, Ensign. Company G--N. M. Curtis, Captain; Simon C. Vedder, First Lieutenant; Wm. L. Best, Ensign. Company H--Warren Gibson, Captain; A. M. Barnard, First Lieutenant; A. S. Tucker, Ensign. Company J--Joel J. Seaver, Captain; F. F. Weed, First Lieutenant; Milton E. Roberts, Ensign. Company K-Wm. W. Wood, Captain; John McFadden, First Lieutenant; Henry L.
ht have been accomplished, first, by turning it upon our right, as Mr. Winthrop was attempting to do when he fell. That attempt might have succeeded; to use the language of Captain Levy, as nearly as I remember it: Had you had a hundred men as brave as Winthrop, and one to lead when he fell, I would be in Fortress Monroe a prisoner of war to-night. It might have been accomplished, second, with much less difficulty upon the left; Captain Haggerty had discovered this, had suggested it to General Pierce, had after some difficulty secured Colonel Townsend's cooperation, when this plan was defeated by the gross blunder of whoever was in command of Townsend's left — a captain I believe — in allowing three companies to become detached from the main body by a thicket. From this circumstance Townsend, as he was proceeding to the attack, was led to believe, as he saw the bayonets of his own men glistening through the foliage, that he was outflanked. He retreated, and that was the end of the
non-extradition of fugitive slaves. These are unquestionably offences against Southern peace and against all good neighborhood, and they ought to cease, as I doubt not in time they will, or at least be materially mitigated; but these grievances lie not at the door of that parental federal Government, whose blessings drop upon us as gently as the dews of heaven, nor are they now for the first time existing. They existed and we endured them under the Democratic administrations of Mr. Polk, Mr. Pierce, and Mr. Buchanan, never dreaming of making them a cause for the dissolution of the Union; and I presume if Mr. Breckinridge had been elected they would never have been even heard of as causes for disruption. Patiently and meekly we bore these grievances when Democratic Presidents held sway; but under the rule of Mr. Lincoln they became wrongs so enormous and intolerable that for them we must in an instant shiver this blessed Union into fragments. But the practical inquiry here arises