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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Francis H. Pierpont or search for Francis H. Pierpont in all documents.

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Doc. 25.-Inaugural of Gov. Pierpont. On June 20, Mr. Pierpont was inaugurated Governor of Virginia by the Convention in session at Wheeling. He made the following address:-- gentlemen of the Convention: I return to you my sincere thanks for this mark of your confidence, in placing me in the most critical and trying position in which any man could be placed at the present time. This day and this event mark a period in the history of constitutional liberty. They mark a period in AmeMr. Pierpont was inaugurated Governor of Virginia by the Convention in session at Wheeling. He made the following address:-- gentlemen of the Convention: I return to you my sincere thanks for this mark of your confidence, in placing me in the most critical and trying position in which any man could be placed at the present time. This day and this event mark a period in the history of constitutional liberty. They mark a period in American history. For more than three-quarters of a century our Government has proceeded, in all the States and in all the Territories upon which our fathers erected it — namely, upon the intelligence of the people; and that in the people resides all power, and that from them all power must emanate. A new doctrine has been introduced by those who are at the head of the revolution in our Southern States--that the people are not the source of all power. Those promulgating this doctrine have trie
ll be over, and peace and prosperity be restored to this once happy country. All which is respectfully submitted. F. H. Pierpont. Documents accompanying the Governors; message. Commonwealth of Virginia, Executive Department, Wheeling, Jf this Commonwealth from domestic violence. I have the honor to be, with great respect, Your obedient servant, F. H. Pierpont, Governor. war Department, Washington, June 25, 1861. sir:--In reply to your application of the 21st instant, foy you. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Hon. Francis H. Pierpont, Governor, Commonwealth of Virginia, Wheeling, Va. Department of the Interior, Washington. To His Excellency, FFrancis H. Pierpont, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia: I, Caleb B. Smith, Secretary of the Interior, do hereby certify that, in discharge of the duty devolved on me by the provisions of an act of Congress, approved May 23d, 1850, entitled
Doc. 32.-Gov. Pierpont's proclamation. Executive Chamber, city of Wheeling, June 22, 1861. Whereas, by an ordinance of the Convention of the people of Virginia, which assembled in this city on the 11th inst., entitled An ordinance for the reorganization of the State Government, it was, among other things, ordained that ting, on the 1st day of July, in the year 1861, and proceed to organize themselves, as prescribed by existing laws, in their respective branches:-- Now I, Francis H. Pierpont, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, do, by this my proclamation, summon the Senators and members of the louse of Delegates, thus composing the Legislle at the United States District Court room, in the city of Wheeling, at noon, on the 1st day of July, 1861. Given under my hand and seal, at the city of Wheeling, this 22d day of June, in the year of our Lord 1861, and the 85th of the Commonwealth. F. H. Pierpont. By the Governor, L. A. Hagans, Secretary of the Commonwealth.
cCook calls a clean trot for Richmond. He is in the mountains northeast of Beverly, and Gen. Morris is after him; and unless he throws away all his guns, and heavy incumbrances, and is nimble on foot,will surely take him. Glorious, isn't it! With the exception of a small force near Charlestown, on the Kanawha River, Gen. McClellan has swept the rebels out of all that part of Virginia which belongs to his military district. The rebellion can never organize itself again in this region. Gov. Pierpont and his new Government will have free scope. The course of our army has been most magnanimous in its treatment of the people. In the neighborhood of the camps, at all houses, there is, on the arrival of the army, a guard stationed to protect the timid from their own fears. On the march from Beverly to this place, many of the houses were vacated entirely by men, women, and children, all having been put in mortal fear by the terrible stories of our atrocities. In many cases, the men (S