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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Francis H. Pierpont or search for Francis H. Pierpont in all documents.

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ted at Huttonsville. Come with your own good weapons and meet them as brothers. On June 20th, the convention at Wheeling elected a provisional governor, Francis H. Pierpont, other State officers and an executive council of five. The convention purported to represent the whole State of Virginia, and Pierpont declared that it waPierpont declared that it was not the object of the convention to set up any new government in the State, other than the one under which they had always lived. A legislature was elected, which met at Wheeling, July 2d, and was called the legislature of the restored government of Virginia. This body elected two senators for Virginia, who took the seats in ties of Mineral, Grant and Summers), did not participate in the initial movement, but were included in the formation of the new State. At the election of May 3d, Pierpont also was elected governor of Virginia, to fill the unexpired term of Governor Letcher, and he continued to administer the affairs of the Trans-Alleghany until th
rters and letter-book at Catlett's Station, he requested that Loring be ordered to clear the valley of the Kanawha and then operate northwardly, so as to join me in the valley of Virginia. During the summer J. D. Imboden, subsequently colonel and brigadier-general in the Confederate service, had been organizing a cavalry battalion in Highland county, enlisting refugees from Braxton, Lewis and Webster counties and other regions, a large majority of his men having but recently escaped from Pierpont's dominion, brimful of fight. In a private letter written about this time, he gave a graphic picture of the situation in the mountain region. He said: No Oriental despot ever exercised such mortal terror by his iron rule of his subjects as is now felt by three-fourths of the true men and women of the northwest. Grown — up men came to me stealthily through the woods to talk to me in a whisper of their wrongs. They would freely have given me grain and meat, but dared not do so. They b