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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 59 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 30 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
hting man, and we felt sure he would help us to regain our State. I explained to him the condition of affairs in Missouri, and General Price's views. Van Dorn had already decided upon a plan of campaign, and in execution of it ordered General Albert Pike, a few days afterward, to Lawrence county, Missouri, with a mixed command of whites and Indians estimated at 7000 men; ordered McIntosh to report to Price at Springfield with McCulloch's infantry; ordered McCulloch to Pocahontas with his mates under McCulloch and Pike. When almost within reach of Curtis (who reported his own strength at 10,500 infantry and cavalry and forty-nine pieces of artillery) Van Dorn unwisely divided his army, and leaving McCulloch with his own command and Pike's to attack Curtis in front, himself made with Price and the Missourians a long circuit to the rear of Curtis, and out of communication with McCulloch. Both columns attacked about the same time on the 7th. Price was completely successful and car
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
n the evening of the 5th. On this march Price's troops were leading, followed by the division of McCulloch, while General Albert Pike, who had come from the Indian Territory by way of Evansville with a brigade of Indians, brought up the rear. The ad until nearly 10 A. M. of the 7th, the first day of the battle, while McCulloch's division, and the Indian brigade under Pike, had only reached a point opposite Leetown, about five miles distant from where Price struck the Telegraph road. (See mae army of Van Dorn and Price, including about two-thirds of McCulloch's troops under Churchill and Greer, and one-third of Pike's Indian Brigade, all of whom had joined Price during the night, were now in precipitate retreat in all directions, pursuewhile we gained time to make our preparations for the reception of both. Finally, on the 8th, Van Dorn was Brigadier-General Albert Pike, C. S. A., Commander of the Indian forces at Pea Ridge. From a photograph. greatly surprised to find himself
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Union and Confederate Indians in the civil War. (search)
ndian Territory. On the Confederate side, General Albert Pike and Colonel Douglas H. Cooper, in the fall anin the Indian Territory. These regiments, under General Pike, participated in the battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., in Indians, and were opposed to the South. Commissioner Pike went away to make treaties with the less civiln his return from the West in September, 1861, Commissioner Pike, at the request of Mr. Ross, went to Park HillIndian Territory. Even before the treaty with Commissioner Pike, Chief Ross had commenced to organize a regimethe treaty of Indian Springs. It is asserted by General Pike and others that with Hopoeithleyohola it was notg and mutilating the Federal dead on the field. General Pike, hearing of the scalping, called on the surgeon d one of the Federal dead Who had been scalped. General Pike then issued an order, denouncing the outrage in and sent a copy of the order to General Curtis. General Pike claimed that part of the Indians were in McCullo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
ut.-Col. Walter P. Lane; 4th Texas, Col. Wm. B. Sims (w), Lieut.-Col. William Quayle; 6th Texas, Col. B. W. Stone; 11th Texas, Lieut.-Col. James J. Dimond. Artillery: Hart's, Provence's, Gaines's, and Good's batteries. Pikers command, Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Cherokee Regiment, Col. Stand Watie; Cherokee Regiment, Col. John Drew; Creek Regiment, Col. D. N. McIntosh; Squadron Texas Cavalry, Capt. O. G. Welch. other troops (not included in preceding roster): 1st Battalion Ark. Cavalry, Majorce of the Union Army did not exceed 10,500 infantry and cavalry, with 49 pieces of artillery. (See Official Records, VIII., p. 196.) The effective strength of the Confederate Army was as follows: Price's command, 6818, with 8 batteries of artillery ( Official Records, VIII., p. 305); McCulloch's command, 8384, with 4 batteries of 18 pieces ( Official Records, VIII., p. 763); and Pike's command, 1,000 ( Official Records, VIII., p. 288), making an aggregate of 16,202 infantry and cavalry. ).
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Composition and losses of the Confederate army. (search)
1st Ark., Col. D. McRae; 3d Louisiana, Major W. F. Tunnard (c), Capt. W. S. Gunnell. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James McIntosh (k): 1st Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. J. T. Churchill; 2d Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. B. T. Embry; 3d Texas, Col. E. Greer, Lieut.-Col. Walter P. Lane; 4th Texas, Col. Wm. B. Sims (w), Lieut.-Col. William Quayle; 6th Texas, Col. B. W. Stone; 11th Texas, Lieut.-Col. James J. Dimond. Artillery: Hart's, Provence's, Gaines's, and Good's batteries. Pikers command, Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Cherokee Regiment, Col. Stand Watie; Cherokee Regiment, Col. John Drew; Creek Regiment, Col. D. N. McIntosh; Squadron Texas Cavalry, Capt. O. G. Welch. other troops (not included in preceding roster): 1st Battalion Ark. Cavalry, Major W. H. Brooks; Battalion Texas Cavalry, Major R. P. Crump; Battalion Texas Mounted Rifles, Major J. W. Whitfield; Teel's Texas Battery; 19th Ark. Infantry, Lieut.-Col. P. R. Smith; 22d Ark. Infantry, Col. G. W. King. The Confederate loss is reporte
t, in the August past, no such election was held or called. Resolutions expressive of fidelity and adherence to the Government were adopted, and a committee appointed for the purpose, drew up a paper which was accepted by the convention as a statement of grievances.--(Doc. 77.) Capt. P. G. D. Morton, captured at Chelsea, Butler County, Kansas, a train of twenty-one wagons, four hundred and twenty-five cattle, twenty-five ponies, and thirty-five prisoners. The train was on its way from Pike's Peak to the Cherokees, who seceded some weeks ago.--N. Y. Times, October 26. Eighty of Major James' cavalry, at Cameron, came upon two hundred and fifty or three hundred rebels, in a cornfield, twenty miles south of Cameron, in Ray County, Missouri. The advance guard of nine of the National troops routed them, the rebels seeking refuge in the timber. The guard was then reinforced by thirty of the cavalry, when they completely drove the rebels from that section, killing eight and tak
continued their retreat to El Paso, and will leave the country entirely. They were greatly demoralized, broken up in bands, and devastating the country, and threatening to kill their General, Sibley, who, they say, deceived them by informing them that it was only necessary to march into the country, which was anxious to receive them, and all they had to do was to drive out the Federal officers, and that they would live and possess the country in ease and luxury. The Colorado volunteers, (Pike's Peakers,) and some one thousand regulars, are at and in the vicinity of Fort Craig, under command of Col. Paul. Gen. Canby has reestablished his headquarters at Santa Fe, where he and the staff are at present.--Missouri Democrat. An expedition consisting of six squadrons of the First Wisconsin cavalry, from Cape Girardeau, Mo., went to Bloomfield yesterday, and early this morning fell upon the rebel Col. Phelan's camp, scattering them in every direction, with one killed and eleven capt
large sums of money were collected for the purpose of paying extra bounties to the volunteers. President Lincoln received the Senators and Representatives of the slaveholding Border States at the Presidential mansion, and addressed them on the subject of emancipation. General Smith, of the rebel army, issued an address to the forces under his command at Vicksburgh, Miss., thanking them for their bravery in resisting the attack made by the Union forces on the city.--The rebel General Albert Pike, in command of Fort McCulloch, Indian Territory, forwarded his unconditional and absolute resignation to Jeff Davis. The British schooner Julia, of Digby, N. S., captured by the National gunboat Kittatinny in Barrataria Creek, La., and the schooner Uncle Mose, captured by the gunboat Tahoma on the coast of Campeachy, arrived at Key West, Fla.--Colonel Thomas Cass, of the Ninth Massachusetts regiment, died at Boston from the effects of wounds received before Richmond. Fairmon
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
rkansas, had assigned Brigadier-General Roane to the command of that State. There were no troops there except a few companies of State militia, and these were badly organized and poorly armed; and Roane, though he had been governor of the .State and was a brave and estimable gentleman, amiable and popular, was wholly unfit for a military command. Besides these militia companies there were some 5000 or 6000 Indian and mixed (Indian and white) troops in the Indian Territory under Brigadier-General Albert Pike, but they could hardly be accounted a force, as they were of no value except on furlough, and had even then to be fed and clothed, and supplied with all sorts of things, and treated with great consideration and gentleness. Arkansas was thus utterly undefended, and her people, feeling that they had been abandoned by the Confederate Government, were fast becoming despondent or apathetic. Those living to the north of the Arkansas among the mountains which rise west of the White
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
encountering a severe rain storm. General Sigel, who led the advance, had already crossed his force over the rapidly swelling stream by means of a single flatboat and the swimming of his horses; but its banks were now filled to the brim with the recent rains, and could not be forded, nor were boats or lumber for their construction to be had there. The ax was soon heard in the surrounding forest, and in the course of five days a rude strong bridge was constructed, under the direction of Captain Pike, of the engineers, dover which the whole Sigel crossing the Osage. army, now thirty thousand strong, with eighty-six heavy guns, safely passed, and moved on in the direction of Springfield, by the way of Bolivar. The commander was full of confidence in the success of his plans, yet fearful of official interference with them by the Secretary of War (Cameron) and the Adjutant-General (Thomas), then in pursuit of him, as he had been informed. See letters to his wife in Mrs. Fremont's
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