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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 116 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 15 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Gideon J. Pillow or search for Gideon J. Pillow in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 9 document sections:

pectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--On the afternoon of the 12th instant I reached Union City, Tennessee, about twenty-six miles southeast of Columbus, Kentucky, in consequence of an exciting incident at Columbus, about noon of that day. I found that Tennessee troops, under command of Major-General G. J. Pillow, were making preparations to occupy Columbus in force, having been invited to do so by the Mayor of Columbus, who had represented to Gen. Pillow that the place was, in all probability, strongly occupied by the United States forces from Cairo. On my representations of the position occupied by Kentucky, Gen. Pillow at once suspended his preparations for the advance movement of his troops, manifesting every disposition to respect the neutrality of our territory. The highly excit
om S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntleroy, Winder, Cocke, Ruggles, and Holmes are in the Provisional Army of Virginia. Gens. Theophilus H. Holmes, Gwynn, and Gattin are in the Provisional Army of North Carolina. Gens. Pillow and Anderson have appointments as Major-Generals in Tennessee. Major-General Jere. Clemens commands in Alabama.--Richmond Whig, July 12.
Doc. 139.-General Pillow's proclamation, at New Madrid, Mo. To the people of Missouri: The forces under my command are your neighbors and friends, and we come at the instance and request of the Governor of your State as allies to protect you against tyranny and oppression. As Tennesseeans, we have deeply sympathized with you. When you were called to arms and manifested a determination to resist the usurper who has trampled under his feet the Constitution of the Government, and destroyed ar such a banner. In this view, and for these purposes, we call upon the people of Missouri to come to our standard, join our forces, and aid in their own liberation. If you would be freemen, you must fight for your rights. Bring such arms as you have. We will furnish ammunition, and lead you on to victory. That the just Ruler of nations is with us is manifested in the glorious victory with which our arms were crowned in the bloody field of Manassas. Gideon J. Pillow, General Commanding
acknowledge his important services. Governor Jackson having considered it desirable for him to visit Richmond, I had intended to await his return to Missouri before I should enter the State; but on consultation with Major-General Polk and General Pillow, we have all come to the conclusion that substantial reasons counsel my presence here. Our constitution provides that, in the absence of the Governor from the State, the Lieutenant-Governor shall possess all the powers and discharge all the May, 1861, entitled An act to authorize the Governor of the State of Missouri to suppress rebellion and repel invasion, I do hereby, as acting Governor of Missouri, in the temporary absence of Governor Jackson, authorize, empower, and request General Pillow to make and enforce such civil police regulations as he may deem necessary for the security of his forces, the preservation of order and discipline in his camp, and the protection of the lives and property of the citizens. By virtue of the s
are with us, immediately to take the field. By a speedy and simultaneous assault on our foes, we can, like a hurricane, scatter them to the winds; while tardy action, like the gentle South wind, will only meet with Northern frosts, and advance and recede, and like the seasons, will be like the history of the war, and will last forever. Come now, strike while the iron is hot! Our enemies are whipped in Virginia. They have been whipped in Missouri. General Hardee advances in the centre, Gen. Pillow on the right, and Gen. McCulloch on the left, with 20,000 brave Southern hearts to our aid. So leave your ploughs in the furrow, and your oxen in the yoke, and rush like a tornado upon our invaders and foes, to sweep them from the face of the earth, or force them from the soil of our State! Brave sons of the Ninth District, come and join us! We have plenty of ammunition, and the cattle on ten thousand hills are ours. We have forty thousand Belgian muskets coming; but bring your guns an
he act of the citizens who are willing to form bodies of volunteers. The State has been invaded by troops from the State of Arkansas, and a large force under Gen. Pillow, of Tennessee, has lauded upon the soil of Missouri, notwithstanding the Congress of the Confederate States, in their act declaring war against the United States, expressly excepted Missouri, as a State against which the war was not to be waged. Gen. Pillow has issued a proclamation, addressed to the people of Missouri, in which he declares that his army comes at the request of the Governor of this State, and says they will help us to expel from our borders the population hostile to our rights and institutions, treating all such as enemies, if found under arms. It remains to be seen whether Gen. Pillow, and other officers of the Confederate States, will continue their endeavor to make Missouri the theatre of war upon the invitation of Gov. Jackson, or of any other person, when such invasion is contrary to the a
se were the best soldiers which the United States had in the State and in the West. They were well drilled by veteran officers, and confident of an easy victory in Missouri. They were the nucleus of the grand Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate Sta
se were the best soldiers which the United States had in the State and in the West. They were well drilled by veteran officers, and confident of an easy victory in Missouri. They were the nucleus of the grand Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate Sta
nemy were impaled upon the bayonet, pulled from their horses, knocked over with the butt of the gun or of the pistol, and so bold and impetuous was every movement that the enemy fled in confusion. Several guns, revolvers, and bowie knives were taken. About two hours after we left our cavalry entered the town, but no enemy was to be seen. They, however, succeeded before morning in capturing a camp of cavalry above town, and brought into camp forty horses and thirty-three prisoners. Gen. Pillow is now in our neighborhood, and a lieutenant among the captured says he will call on us with twenty thousand men in a few days! Another of our prisoners says that he made a speech to them yesterday, and promised them that they should take breakfast in Cairo this morning! The prisoners look bad. About one-third of them appear intelligent — the balance have about half sense, and have certainly been induced to take up arms against their Government by the misrepresentations of the designing