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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 116 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 15 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Gideon J. Pillow or search for Gideon J. Pillow in all documents.

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fight. The question of the final evacuation, was left open, to be decided as time and circumstances should dictate, and in the mean time, the army and the people were to be cajoled into the belief that Corinth was the last ditch — the spot where Pillow intended to die. All of the citizens of Corinth, and I believe of the rebel States, believed the place would be held at all hazards, and the chagrin and disappointment at its evacuation, without a blow, were deep and bitter. I talked with sev he having given out to that impression. But the fact was, he was searching for a place to which to make retreat, and on his return he called a council of war on Tuesday evening, and announced his determination to evacuate Corinth. I learn that Pillow, Price and Hardee concurred with him, and that Bragg and Van Dorn opposed the movement, as absolutely destructive of the cause. But all would not do; the order was given, and Corinth was evacuated. The sick, of whom there were a great number
nty guns of various calibres. These works are of more recent construction. Besides this, there are on the heights, and in isolated positions near the top, excavations, behind which a single gun was mounted, or, more correctly speaking, dismounted. The plan of the rebels has evidently been to remove most of their best guns, and to shatter the rest by over-charges. A few of them have stood the test, and may be considered amply safe hereafter. Fort Pillow, named after the celebrated Gideon J. Pillow, of Mexican ditch and Fort Donelson notoriety, is an immense system of earthworks, situated on the first Chickasaw bluffs, sixty-five miles above Memphis, and one hundred and seventy-five below Cairo. The first fortifications were, as I learned from a native, commenced about a year ago, early in June, 1861, at the time when Memphis was in a ferment, and the secession of Tennessee was eagerly canvassed. The original design has been greatly enlarged, so that little or no trace of the or