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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 34 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 4 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Parker Pillsbury or search for Parker Pillsbury in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
hat night there were at least a thousand Garrisonians in Nantucket! Another eye witness, Parker Pillsbury, reports ( Acts of the A. S. Apostles, p. 327): When the young man [Douglass] closed,nd forthwith renounce them as a Christian church and clergy. To this substitute rallied Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and N. P. Rogers, while Mr. Garrison and Charles C. Burleigh contended showing whether they make any distinction in regard to color. This had the approval of Messrs. Pillsbury and Collins, but not of H. C. Wright, or of Garrison, or of Edmund Quincy, and did not prenderstood as discussing abolition E. G. Loring. topics in the style of our friends Wright and Pillsbury. H. C. Wright, P. Pillsbury. Neither would I, though I am quite a tomahawk sort of Cf. anteP. Pillsbury. Neither would I, though I am quite a tomahawk sort of Cf. ante, p. 5. man myself. On the other hand, Abby Kelley, writing to G. W. Benson, censures Charles Burleigh for not Ms. Sept. 13, 1841. wanting S. S. Foster sent to lecture in Connecticut, where the new-
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
Ms. Sept. 22, 1844, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. public attention, and caused the Massachusetts abolitionists to curtail their labors in the field till after the election. In New Hampshire it was otherwise, but there an obstacle was encountered domestic to the abolition ranks. Abby Kelley to W. L. Garrison. Franklin, N. H., Sept. 26, 1844. Ms. You may not be aware of the fact that we are trying to upturn some of the hard soil of New Hampshire. Douglass, Pillsbury, F. Douglass, P. Pillsbury, S. S. Foster, John M. Spear, C. L. Remond, W. A. White. Foster, Spear, Jane E. Hitchcock of Oneida, N. Y., and myself are in the field, and Remond and, perhaps, White will soon be here. The State has been most wofully neglected for some two years past, and this, with no-organization, has well nigh hedged up our way to immediate great usefulness. Bro. Rogers gives N. P. Rogers. no word of cheer, blows no bugle rallying-cry for the efforts now being put forth. He cannot, with his views
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
tin; ante, 2.189. He never spoke a word too much— Except of Story, or some such, Joseph Story; Whom, though condemned by ethics strict, Lib. 12.174. The heart refuses to convict. Beyond, a crater in each eye, Sways brown, broad-shouldered Pillsbury, Parker Pillsbury, though a native of Massachusetts, became identified by his home life and anti-slavery labors principally with New Hampshire. He succeeded to the editorship of the Herald of Freedom when N. P. Rogers broke with his old assParker Pillsbury, though a native of Massachusetts, became identified by his home life and anti-slavery labors principally with New Hampshire. He succeeded to the editorship of the Herald of Freedom when N. P. Rogers broke with his old associates. His autobiography is to be gathered from his Acts of the Anti-Slavery Apostles. ‘Could you know him and his history, you would value him,’ wrote Wendell Phillips to Elizabeth Pease, Jan. 10, 1853 (Ms.). ‘Originally a wagoner, he earned enough to get educated. When just ready to be settled, the Faculty of Andover Theological Institution threatened him that they would never recommend him to a parish unless he gave up speaking in anti-slavery meetings. He chose us, and sacrificed all
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ds a potent reformatory pen, but his organ of hope is not quite large enough. There seems to be no branch of reform to which he has not given some attention. New Brighton is a small village of eight hundred inhabitants, but there are several other villages in its immediate neighborhood. There have been a good many lectures on slavery given in it by our leading anti-slavery lecturers such as Stephen and A. K. Foster, Burleigh, Pillsbury, Douglass, etc.; but the people C. C. Burleigh, P. Pillsbury. generally remain incorrigible. The secret is, they are much priest-ridden—thus confirming afresh the assertion of the prophet, like people, like priest. The Hicksite Quakers Hosea 4.9. have a meeting-house here, but they are generally pro-slavery in spirit. No place could be obtained for our meeting excepting the upper room of a large store, which was crowded to excess, afternoon and evening, several hundred persons being present, and many other persons not being able to obtain admit
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
to it. He is a member of the American and Mass. Boards, and is always ready with his money, and has no reverences of any kind. He began by being a Come-outer. He is one of the best of fellows. A thorough man of business, managing a very large concern and making plenty of money, without being the slave of business or money. John W. Browne, Maria W. Chapman, Charles K. Whipple, Samuel Philbrick, Loring Moody, Edmund Quincy, S. S. and Abby Kelley Foster, G. W. Benson, Andrew Robeson, Parker Pillsbury, James and Lucretia Mott, Edward M. Davis, C. C. Burleigh, H. C. Wright, J. Miller McKim, Thomas McClintock, and Joseph C. Hathaway. These were joined later by Samuel May, Jr., R. F. Wallcut, Increase S. Smith, William A. White, and Joshua T. Everett. The anti-slavery complexion of this list was unmistakable, and, in truth, if any experience could breed anti-Sabbath conventions, it had been precisely that of the abolitionists. On an earlier occasion, the Rev. Samuel May, Jr., had sai
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
he scenes in the hall of the Society Library in the evening of May 7, when some two dozen rioters drowned with jocose and abusive interlocutions, with Lib. 20:[78]. hisses, oaths, catcalls, and a general charivari, the attempted speeches of Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and Mrs. Ernestine L. Rose. Wednesday's sessions opened in the morning at the May 8, 1850. same place. According to the Tribune's report of the 348 Broadway. proceedings— Mr. Garrison wished to say, once for allities, too, Mr. Thompson, who preserved the Lib. 20.191, 195, 198, 203, 207. vigor of his appearance and all his old eloquence, was heard with pleasure and without molestation. He received and accepted invitations even from New Hampshire. Parker Pillsbury, however, wrote from Concord, N. H., to Mr. Garrison: I take the liberty of calling your attention to the late Union Ms. Nov. 28, 1850. meeting in Manchester in this State, as reported in the N. H. Patriot. You will, I think, be great
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
accept the hospitality of slaveholders. If he be a patriot, a lover of liberty, whether he fly from the banks of the Danube, the Seine, or the Tiber, let him go to New England, and find a home with the persecuted and maligned abolitionists of the country! Let him throw in his lot with them; let him range himself under the banner of No Union with Tyrants! Francis Jackson and Samuel May, Jr.; James Mott and J. Miller McKim; Abraham Brooke of Ohio; Abby Kelley Foster, H. C. Wright, and Parker Pillsbury, were likewise heard or seen at this meeting. William Goodell was present; and William H. Burleigh, who had strayed into the Liberty Party fold, recanted of Lib. 21.78. his bitter opposition to his old abolition co-workers. Frederick Douglass, on the other hand, avowed his radical Lib. 21.78, 82. change of mind in regard to the nature of the Constitution, which he now looked upon as an anti-slavery instrument. On Daniel Webster, as the ex-officio custodian of the law of treason,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
e had risen from a very humble origin Lib. 27.94. without education, and manifested considerable gifts of style as a writer. His manners were amiable, gentle, and attractive. Henry C. Wright accounted him a Jesus of this day. Lib. 23.64. Mr. Garrison gave his open approval to the call not Lib. 23:[83]. long after its appearance, lent his signature to it, and consented to take part in the proceedings. He shared the hospitality of the Davises with H. C. Wright, Parker Lib. 23.95. Pillsbury, and Joseph Barker, the last-named being chosen to preside over the Convention. Barker had apparently taken permanent leave of his native England, having purchased a farm in Ohio and removed thither with his Lib. 23.11. family. On his preliminary visit to this country he had received from Mr. Garrison in Boston attentions like those Ms. Albany, Apr. 19, 1851. he had bestowed in England. Once settled, he identified himself with the abolitionists, writing copiously for the J. Barker to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
on of the antislavery and other reforms. His trustees for this purpose, clothed with absolute discretion, were Phillips, Garrison, S. S. and Abby K. Foster, Parker Pillsbury, H. C. Wright, Francis Jackson, and C. K. Whipple. Seeing the strongest bond of the Union of the States in the chains upon four millions of slaves, with tyrto throw all hunkerdom into convulsions? And then, six thousand dollars distributed among such fanatical, infidel, disorganizing persons as Henry C. Wright, Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and William Lloyd Garrison, and their families! Verily, this is to cause endurance to pass its bounds! It is quite insufferable! I ao commit the Lib. 29.17. antislavery organization to this doctrine, they encountered the optimism and fair-mindedness of Mr. Garrison, in MSS. Mar. 24, 1859, P. Pillsbury to S. May, Jr.; June 3, W. L. G. to Pillsbury; July 22, 25, to A. K. Foster. discussions that led to no little personal feeling and alienation, which time woul