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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Pindar or search for Pindar in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
f; for later writers, say what we will of their genius, have rarely if ever equalled the elaborate beauty and finish and the lifelong and heroic literary labours of the ancients. Thoreau translated the Prometheus Vinctus and tried his hand at Pindar. His pages are sown with classical allusions and quotations. The sunset at Cape Cod brings a line of Homer into his memory with a rush, as the shining torch of the sun falls into the ocean. He has words of just appreciation for Anacreon. Hise beauty, which does not propose itself, but must be approached and studied like a natural object. Such genuine admiration for Greek genius is rare at any time, and certainly not many American hands could have been busy translating Aeschylus, Pindar, and Anacreon in the hurried forties and fifties of the nineteenth century. This large and solid academic basis for Thoreau's culture is not generally observed. His devotion to the Greeks rings truer than his various utterances on Indian litera
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
to strenuous effort over his copy of verses, insisting that if a vessel glides off the ways smoothly and easily at her launching, it does not mean that no great pains have been taken to secure the result; and he proudly reminded his readers that Pindar's great odes were occasional poems . . . and yet they have come down among the most precious bequests of antiquity to modern times. The noblest example of English prose in the nineteenth century, Lincoln's Gettysburg address, was also evoked by an occasion. Even if Holmes's occasional verse has not the lofty elevation of Pindar's odes or the pathetic simplicity of Lincoln's little speech, it has almost always an exquisite propriety to the event itself, an unfailing happiness of epithet, a perfect adequacy to the moment of local importance. Its chief fault, if not its only defect, is that there is too much of it, even if its average is higher than might reasonably be expected. In a letter to Lowell, Holmes declared, speaking of Bos
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
e Great, 136 Petroleum V. Nasby. See Locke, D. R. Pfaff's restaurant, 268 Phelps, Austen, 208 Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart. See Ward, Elizabeth S. P. Philanthropist, the, 45 Philip II, 129, 136, 139, 146 Philo Judaeus, 211 Philosophy of history, the, 4 Philosophy of the short story, the, 388 Phoenixiana, 156 Physiology of verse, the, 229 Picayune, 184 Picket-Guard, The, 280 Pierce, Franklin, 19, 21 Pierce, Miss, 215 Pike, Albert, 290, 292, 298, 303 Pindar, 2, 3, 238 Pinkney, Edward Coate, 289 Pintard, John, 115 Pioneer, the, 165, 246 Pioneer times in California, 363 n. Pitkin, Timothy, 108, 111 Pitt, William, 93, 96 Place of Judge story in the making of American law, the, 77 n. Plain and pleasant talk about fruit, flowers and farming, 215 Plato, 197, 211, 213 Plebeian, 264 n. Plu-Ri-Bus Tah, 156 Poe, Edgar Allan, 37, 55-69, 165, 168, 173, 174, 225, 239, 245, 249, 289, 290, 327, 351, 358, 362, 369, 370, 373, 37