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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ide of that gun. Another shell followed in a few seconds, wounding the captain of No. 7, three men at No. 8, and myself. Four men were killed and nine wounded in all, and by those three shells. * * * Acting-Master's Mate J. J. Tinelli I cannot fail to mention. He behaved with great gallantry, encouraging the men by his example, and served the guns of the division with great spirit against the rebel gun-boats and rain after I was sent below. Men honorably mentioned: Forbes, Ingersoll and Pinto, Gun-Captains; William E. Stanley, Shellman. From Report of Ensign George B. Glidden, commanding Master's Division, U. S. S. Hartford: Sir — I have the honor to submit to you a report of the conduct of the officers and men of the Master's Division during the engagement yesterday with Fort Morgan, the rebel gun-boats and the rain Tennessee. I have great pleasure in mentioning Acting-Master's Mate G. R. Avery, who assisted in conning the ship during the entire action, for the great co
he elevation as we neared the Fort. When abreast of it two rounds of shrapnel cut for two-inch were fired by us. As we passed ahead of the Brooklyn, two shell struck by No. 7 gun, disabling the crew; but one man escaped uninjured on the right side of that gun. Another shell followed in a few seconds, wounding the captain of No. 7, three men at No. 8, and myself. Four men were killed and nine wounded in all, and by those three shell. The gun-captains behaved splendidly — Forbes, Ingersoll, Pinto. Wm. E. Stanley, shellman of No. 8 gun, continued to pass shell after being wounded, till compelled by loss of blood to go below; he deserves especial mention. Every man did his duty in the most gallant manner. I am proud to have had command of so brave a set of men. Acting Master's Mate J. J. Tinelli I cannot fail to mention. He behaved with great gallantry, encouraging the men by his example, and served the guns of the division with great spirit, against the rebel gunboats and ram, aft
, the next day, to receive me. Soon after I had returned to my hotel, Senhor Porto entered my room, to inform me that Captain Pinto, of the Brazilian Navy, the commanding naval officer on the station, accompanied by the Chief of Police, had called tt, and being ushered, by an orderly in waiting, into a suite of spacious, and elegantly furnished apartments, I found Captain Pinto, and his Excellency, both prepared to receive me. We proceeded, at once, to business. I exhibited to his Excellency the proceeding. The United States Consul, in the protest addressed to me, a copy of which I sent you, yesterday, by Captain Pinto, and the Chief of Police, states that you had not been permitted to coal, in any of the ports, which you have hithertint in question—that is to say, that coal is not contraband of war, and may be supplied by neutrals to belligerents. Captain Pinto, to whom his Excellency handed the paper, read aloud the decision, putting it into very good Portuguese, as he went a
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Leaves from a Roman diary: February, 1869 (Rewritten in 1897) (search)
erving anything about them. When we came to the statue of St. Peter, P — said, pointing to the big toe: You see there the mischief that can be done by too much kissing. Nearly a third of the toe has been worn away by the oscular applications of the faithful. Feb. 4, 1869. Dr. B. B. Appleton, an American resident of Florence, is here on a flying visit. We have heard from many sources of the kindness of this man to American travellers, especially to young students. In fact, he took - Pinto his house while at Florence, and entertained him in the most generous manner. He has done the same for Mrs. Julia Ward Howe and many others. He lives with an Italian family who were formerly in the service of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and who were ruined by the recent change of rulers. Dr. Appleton boards with them, and helps to support them in other ways. In spite of his goodness he does not seem to be happy. One of his chief friends in Florence is Fraulein Assig, who was banished f