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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 32 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 24 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 22 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 20 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Plato or search for Plato in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
underestimate the element of truth in the narrative, and Carver's share in its production. Carver was not too uneducated to make notes and gather materials for a book. He could write a long coherent letter to his first wife, and specimens of his writing are not in the hand of an ignorant man. He, not less than his assistant or assistants in publication, could have met with the works of Charlevoix, Adair, and Lahontan in London book-stalls. But it was hardly his pen that made reference to Plato and Grotius. The volume is dedicated To Joseph Banks, President of the Royal Society. Then follows, in the second edition, a magniloquent Address to the Public. The journal proper occupies but a third of the volume. Next come seventeen chapters on the origin, physique, and dress of the Indians, their manners and customs, their government, their food, dances, methods of warfare and games, and their language. The eighteenth deals with animals, birds-as, for example, the Whipperwill, or
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
ghbours up, we feel that here is the homely New England version of Shelley's cry to the West Wind: Be through my lips to unawakened earth The trumpet of a prophecy! When Thoreau, on another occasion, writes that he was not aware that the capacity to hear the woodpecker had slumbered within me so long, the words have all the spontaneity of underived utterance, and yet who can deny that the peculiar turn of that expression goes back through German or we know not what other channels to Plato and still remoter Eastern sources? This mention of the East is suggestive of all the weaknesses of transcendentalism: its tendency to neglect proximate and to refer everything to primal causes; its attempt to attain the spiritual not by subduing but by turning its back on the material; its proneness to substitute passivity and receptiveness for alertness and creative force; its traces of a paralysing pantheism and fatalism; its ineffectualness; its atrophy of will. More than a touch of e
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: Emerson (search)
year at college and contains notes for a prize dissertation on the Character of Socrates. Among the sentences is this: What is God? said the disciples, and Plato replied, It is hard to learn and impossible to divulge. And the last page of the record, in the twelfth volume, repeats what is really the same thought: The ces jostled together like so many mutually repellent particles; but because from the manner of his composition Emerson often missed what he might have learned from Plato's Phaedrus was the essence of good rhetoric, that is to say, the consciousness of his hearer's mind as well as of his own. We hear him, as it were, talking to himsiographers has attempted to set forth this philosophy as a synthesis and an anticipation. It is a synthesis because in it we find, as Emerson had already found in Plato and Plotinus, a reconciliation of the many and the one, the everlasting flux and the motionless calm at the heart of things: An ample and generous recognitio
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
mbus, 181 Pierre, 323 Pierrepont, Sarah, 58 Pietas et Gratulatio, etc., 168 Pike, Albert, 319 Pilot, the, 297, 300 Pinkerton, John, 205 Pioneer, consisting of essays, literary, moral and theological, the, 234 n. Pioneers, the, 208, 293, 296, 297, 298, 299 Pirate, the, 297 Pizarro, 287 Placide, Henry, 221, 227 Plain man's Path-way to Heaven, The, 116 Plan of a proposed union between great Britain and the colonies, 138 Planting of the Apple Tree, the, 271 Plato, 193, 352, 360 Players of a century, 231 n. Pleasures of the imagination, 165 Plotinus, 266, 360 Plutarch, 93 Pocahontas, 17 Pocahontas, 225 Pocahontas or the settlers of Virginia, 221, 225 Poe, Edgar Allan, 181, 261, 266, 273, 275, 280, 313, 324 Poems (Bryant), 260 n., 269 n., 270 n., 271 n. Poems (Halleck), 283 Poems of Arouet, 178 Poems, dramatic and miscellaneous (Mercy Warren), 179 Poem on the happiness of America, 169 Poems by several hands (17