hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 32 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 24 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 22 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 20 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Plato or search for Plato in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
you must honor the artist for such a production. He already knows you as the friend of his friends, and I know will be glad to see you. Felton is well, and his wife better than for two years. Evening before last I passed at his house, talking of Plato, his philosophy, and the editions of his works. It was towards ten o'clock; and I was about to walk to town. I persuaded him (easy soul!) to walk with me all the way to enjoy some oysters at Concert Hall, and then to return on his weary footsteated by moral truth. The knowledge and the principles derived from these sources will teach them gentleness and modesty, and will make them unwilling to venture their hands too rashly upon the helm of State. In reading the second Alcibiades of Plato lately, I was struck with its beauty and truth, and also with its applicability to our own times and country. In that admirable dialogue, Socrates, by a masterly course of reasoning, shows the necessity of peculiar discipline and instruction to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
described by those who know him as a remarkable statesman,—more than a match for Pottinger, Cushing, and Lagrenee. Cushing has made a grammar of the Manchu language, which he proposes to publish,—whether in English or Latin he had not determined. You know he studied diligently the old Tartar dialect, that he might salute the Emperor in his court language. Fletcher Webster is preparing a book on China. What is thought of Cousin and his philosophy? Is the first volume of his edition of Plato published? How is Guizot's name pronounced? Is the Gui as in Guido in Italian, or as in guillotine in French? I detest the war spirit in Thiers's book. It is but little in advance of the cannibalism of New Zealand. What do you think of phrenology, and of animal magnet. ism? Eothen is a vivid, picturesque book, by a man of genius. What are you doing? When do you set your face Westward? I suppose Wheaton will be recalled; and I was told yesterday that Irving would be also, in all p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
e finished on earth, you will come to join us, and we shall receive you as friends receive friends; but, if you neglect our words, expect no happy greeting then from us. The chief of this is borrowed almost literally from the words attributed by Plato to the Fathers of Athens, in the beautiful Funeral Discourse of the Menexenus. Honor to the memory of our Fathers! May the turf lie gently on their sacred graves! But let us not in words only, but in deeds also, testify our reverence for ove all, in cultivating those highest perfections, Justice and Love, Justice which like that of St. Louis shall not swerve to the right hand or to the left; Love, which like that of William Penn shall regard all mankind of kin. God is angry, says Plato, when any one censures a man like himself, or praises a man of an opposite character. And the godlike man is the good man. And again, in another of those lovely dialogues, vocal with immortal truth: Nothing resembles God more than that man amon