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costume, his careless laughter, his love of ladies; at his banjo-player, his flower-wreathed horses, and his gay verses. The enemy were wiser. Buford, Bayard, Pleasanton, Stoneman, and their associates, did not commit that blunder. They had felt the heavy arm too often; and knew too well the weight of that flower-encircled weapss just as the enemy rushed on them. A third instance was the second ride around McClellan in Maryland, October, 1862; when coming to the Monocacy he found General Pleasanton, with a heavy force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, in his path, but unhesitatingly attacked and cut his way through. Still another at Jack's Shop, whed to him, he was never whipped. More than once he was driven back, and two or three times badly hurt; but it was not the superior genius of Buford, Stoneman, Pleasanton, or other adversaries, which achieved those results. It was the presence of an obstacle which his weapon could not break. Numbers were too much for brain and
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. (search)
he advance at Mitchell's Station, on the Orange road, and General Lee faced him on the south bank of the Rapidan. One day there came from our signal-station, on Clarke's Mountain, the message: General Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland, Georgia. General Fitz Lee thereupon sent to General Stuart, after the jocose fashion of General Fitz, to ask why Pleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, thaPleasanton had been sent to Cumberland, Georgia. The message should have been Cumberland George's-the house, that is to say, of the Rev. Mr. George, in the suburbs of Culpeper Court-House. Every day, at that time, the whistle of the Yankee cars, as we used to call them, was heard a few miles off, at Mitchell's Station; and as General Meade was plainly going to advance, it was obvious that he was going to fall back. It was at this time, early in October, that for reasons best known to himself, General Lee determined upon a movement through Madison, along the base of the Blue Ridge, to flank General Me
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Facetiae of the camp: souvenirs of a C. S. Officer. (search)
made up of trifles ā€” is it not? General Fitz Lee, one day in the fall of 1863, sent a courier up from the Lower Rappahannock, to ask General Stuart why General Pleasanton of the U. S. Army had been sent to Georgia? --a dispatch by signal from corps headquarters having communicated that intelligence. Grand tableau when the affair was explained! General Stuart had signalled: Meade's Headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland George's --names of persons residing near Culpeper Court-house. The signal flags had said: Meade's headquarters are at Wallack's, and Pleasanton's at Cumberland Georgia! Ii. In November, 1863, LiPleasanton's at Cumberland Georgia! Ii. In November, 1863, Lieutenant ā€” was in an old deserted mansion near Culpeper Court-house, with some prisoners confined in the upper rooms; the enemy not being far distant. While waiting, a blaze shot up from a fire which some soldiers had kindled near, and threw the shadow of the Lieutenant on the wall. Thinking the shadow was a human being he calle
no guerilla, was the reply. What do you belong to? The first New Jersey. Who comamnds it? Major Janaway. Right. Who commands the brigade? Colonel Taylor. Right again. Where is it stationed? In the edge of Warrenton. Yes. Who commands the division? Look here, said Sā€” , who was thoroughly acquainted with every part of his role, I am tired of your asking me so many questions; but I will answer. The First New Jersey is in Taylor's brigade, Gregg's division, and Pleasanton commands the whole. I belong to the regiment, and am no guerilla. He's all right, boys, said one of the men; let him go. No, said another; I saw him capture one of our men ten minutes ago. You are mistaken, said S-. You are a guerilla! exclaimed the man. And how do I know you are not guerillas? said Sā€” ; you have on blue coats, but let me see your pantaloons. They raised their coat-skirts and showed their blue regulation pantaloons. Now show yours, they said.