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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding and death of General J. E. B. Stuart-several errors corrected. (search)
one years, three months and six days old. A third error is in reference to the death of his child. He left two children — a son, who bears his father's name, and a baby daughter, only seven months old, to whom he had given the name Virginia, named for the State in whose defence he yielded up his life. The child he lost was a daughter, Flora. She died November 3, 1862, when the Confederate cavalry were for fourteen consecutive days fighting untiringly, holding in check the whole of Pleasanton's cavalry, supported heavily by infantry, who were covering McClellan s march across to Fauquier, when McClellan was superseded by Burnside, before the army moved to Fredericksburg. The loss of this dearly loved child was a great blow to him, greatly increased by his utter inability to be with her; but in his letters be expressed the most beautiful Christian resignation and his perfect willingness to meet the same great change whenever his Maker should call. The world knows little of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
curing, through scouts and reconnoitring parties, information of the enemy's movements. In one of these, Major Mosby, with his usual daring, penetrated the enemy's lines and caught a staff officer of General Hooker, bearer of dispatches to General Pleasanton, commanding United States cavalry near Aldie. These dispatches disclosed the fact that Hooker was looking to Aldie with solicitude, and that General Pleasanton, with infantry and cavalry, occupied the place, and that a reconnoissance in foGeneral Pleasanton, with infantry and cavalry, occupied the place, and that a reconnoissance in force of cavalry was meditated towards Warrenton and Culpeper. I immediately dispatched to General Hampton, who was coming by way of Warrenton from the direction of Beverly's ford, this intelligence, and directed him to meet this advance at Warrenton. The captured dispatches also gave the entire number of divisions, from which we could estimate the approximate strength of the enemy's army. I therefore concluded in no event to attack with cavalry alone the enemy at Aldie. As long as he kept wit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
0 horses. This did not include a brigade of Pleasanton's division of three regiments and a battery ry corps consisted of three divisions, under Pleasanton, Buford and Averell. General Hunt, as Chiefcum, for Germanna ford, the Fifth for Ely's. Pleasanton, with one brigade of cavalry, accompanied th with Stoneman, except three regiments under Pleasanton, which were retained by Hooker for service w's, on Plank road, west of Chancellorsville; Pleasanton's cavalry to be at Chancellorsville, and Hoo including the three cavalry regiments under Pleasanton. The Second corps numbered 16,836; but Gibbattacked and captured four hundred of them. Pleasanton was with Sickles, in command of the Sixth Nef Jackson, came near being cut off himself. Pleasanton, who was with him, says he sent back the Eig the Eleventh corps the Rebels came on, says Pleasanton, rapidly but now in silence, with that skillagainst him, and struck him down senseless. Pleasanton says, when he saw him about 10 A. M. that da