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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
l B. Hayman. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel Leasure: 3d Md., Col. Joseph M. Sudsburg; 21st Mass., Lieut-Col. George P. Hawkes; 100th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Matthew M. Dawson. Artillery: 2d Me., Capt. Albert F. Thomas; 14th Mass., Capt. J. W. B. Wright. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter. First Brigade, Col. Zenas R. Bliss: 36th Mass., Maj. William F. Draper; 58th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton; 51st N. Y., Col. Charles W. Le Gendre; 45th Pa., Col. John I. Curtin; 48th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Henry Pleasants; 7th R. I., Capt. Theodore Winn. Second Brigade, Col. Simon G. Griffin: 31st Me., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Hight; 32d Me., Maj. Arthur Deering; 6th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Henry H. Pearson; 9th N. H., Lieut.-Col. John W. Babbitt; 11th N. H., Col. Walter Harriman; 17th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Charles Cummings. Artillery: 11th Mass., Capt. Edward J. Jones; 19th N. Y., Capt. Edward W. Rogers. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Orlando B. Willcox. First Brigade, Col. John F. Hartranft: 2d Mich., Col. Willi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
y, Maj. William H. Reynolds; 24th N. Y. Cav. (dismounted), Col. William C. Raulston; 2d Pa., Provisional Art'y, Col. Thomas Wilhelm. Acting Engineers: 35th Mass., Capt. Edward G. Park. Artillery: 3d Me., Capt. Albert F. Thomas; 14th Mass., Capt. Joseph W. B. Wright. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter. First Brigade, Col. John I. Curtin: 36th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Arthur A. Goodell; 58th Mass., Lieut.-Col. John C. Whiton; 45th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Francis M. Hills; 48th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Henry Pleasants; 7th R. I., Capt. Percy Daniels. Second Brigade, Col. Simon G. Griffin: 2d Md.,----; 31st Me., Col. Thomas Hight; 32d Me., Lieut.-Col. John M. Brown; 6th N. H., Maj. Phin. P. Bixby; 9th N. H., Capt. Andrew J. Hough; 11th N. H., Capt. Hollis O. Dudley; 17th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Charles Cummings. Acting Engineers: 51st N. Y., Capt. George W. Whitman. Artillery, Capt. Edward W. Rogers: 11th Mass., Capt. Edward J. Jones; 19th N. Y., Capt. Edward W. Rogers. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Or
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of the Petersburg crater. (search)
tion was a deep hollow. [See map, p. 538.] A few days after gaining this position Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pleasants, who had been a mining engineer and who belonged to the 48th Pennsylvania Volunteeas commenced on the 25th of June. If ever a man labored under disadvantages, that man was Colonel Pleasants. In his testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, he said: My regimene, the corps commander, and General Potter, the division commander. On the 23d of July Colonel Pleasants had the whole mine ready for the placing of the powder. With proper tools and instrumentsial, which had to be carried the whole length of the gallery. Every night the pioneers of Colonel Pleasants's regiment had to cut bushes to cover the fresh dirt at the mouth of the gallery; otherwisned in their papers, and they have been heard at work on what are supposed to Brevet Brigadier-General Henry Pleasants. From a photograph. II, [for title, see previous Page.] from Sketches made
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
paration, under the immediate supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pleasants, of the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania, of Burnsih indifferent tools and a great lack of proper materials, Pleasants began the task on the 25th of June, and on the 23d of July 400 in number, under the special direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Pleasants. The excavation was made through soft earth focident postponed that event until almost five o'clock, Pleasants lighted the fuse at a quarter past three o'clock, and wai when Lieutenant Jacob Douty and Sergeant Henry Reese, of Pleasants's regiment, volunteered to go in and examine into the cauxteen minutes before five o'clock the mine exploded. See Pleasants's Report. when the fort, its guns, caissons, and other muthe magazines which composed the mine. It is copied from Pleasants's Report. twenty-five to thirty feet in depth. The Natiorm occurred until long after the explosion; Lieutenant-Colonel Pleasants, in his report, made on the 2d of August, says:
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
ine was begun there over a month since, and has been quite finished for a week. It was at first rather an amateur affair, for the policy of the future operations had not then been fixed. However, it was steadily pushed, being in charge of Colonel Pleasants, who has a regiment of Pennsylvania coal-miners. He first ran a subterranean gallery, straight out to the enemy's bastion, where they had four guns. Then three lateral passages were made, each terminating in a chamber, to be filled with g after four o'clock. He said, What is the matter with the mine? General Meade shrugged his shoulders and said, I don't know — guess the fuse has gone out. Which was a true guess. Where the fuse was spliced, it stopped burning; upon which Colonel Pleasants coolly went into the gallery and fired the new end! At ten minutes before five there was a distant, dull-sounding explosion, like a heavy gun, far away; and, in an instant, as if by magic, the whole line of batteries burst forth in one roa
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
nry Lyman, 208. Pease, Charles Elliott, 358. Peeble house, 235, 254, 321. Peel, Cecil Lennox, captain, 49. Pell, Duncan Archibald, 212, 312, 319. Pemberton, John Clifford, 102. Perkins house, 328. Perkinson, —, 347. Petersburg, manoeuvres about, 160; mine, 195, 310, 341; taken, 333, 339. Phillips, Charles Appleton, 169. Picket line, described, 301. Piney Branch church, 104. Platt, Edward Russell, 123. Pleasonton, Alfred, 75, 79, 80; Lyman with, 14; for command, 60. Pleasants, Henry, 195, 198. Plunder, demoralizing effect, 40; Hancock and, 288. Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, 193. Pontoon bridge, 130, 159. Po-Ny, 119. Pope, John, 60. Poplar Grove church, 234. Porter, David Dixon, 249. Porter, Georgia Ann (Patterson), 249. Porter, Horace, 142. Potter, Alonzo, 167. Potter, Robert Barnwell, 166, 212, 219, 234, 237, 296, 297, 334. Pourtales, Louis Auguste de, 212. Pratt, Mary, 26. Prisoners, provost, 13; Rebel, 32, 45, 324, 836, 347. Punishme
, 1864, at the exploding of the hidden mine under Elliott's salient, the strong Confederate fortification opposite. The plan of the mine was conceived by Colonel Henry Pleasants and approved by Burnside, whose Ninth Corps, in the assaults of June 17th and 18th, had pushed their advance position to within 130 yards of the Confederate works. Pleasants had been a mining engineer and his regiment, the forty-eighth Pennsylvania, was composed mainly of miners from the coal regions. The work was begun on June 25th and prosecuted under the greatest difficulties. In less than a month Pleasants had the main gallery, 510.8 feet long, the left lateral gallery, 37 fePleasants had the main gallery, 510.8 feet long, the left lateral gallery, 37 feet long, and the right lateral gallery; 38 feet long, all completed. While finishing the last gallery, the right one, the men could hear the Confederates working in the fortification above them, trying to locate the mine, of which they had got wind. It was General Burnside's plan that General Edward Ferrero's division of colored
, 1864, at the exploding of the hidden mine under Elliott's salient, the strong Confederate fortification opposite. The plan of the mine was conceived by Colonel Henry Pleasants and approved by Burnside, whose Ninth Corps, in the assaults of June 17th and 18th, had pushed their advance position to within 130 yards of the Confederate works. Pleasants had been a mining engineer and his regiment, the forty-eighth Pennsylvania, was composed mainly of miners from the coal regions. The work was begun on June 25th and prosecuted under the greatest difficulties. In less than a month Pleasants had the main gallery, 510.8 feet long, the left lateral gallery, 37 fePleasants had the main gallery, 510.8 feet long, the left lateral gallery, 37 feet long, and the right lateral gallery; 38 feet long, all completed. While finishing the last gallery, the right one, the men could hear the Confederates working in the fortification above them, trying to locate the mine, of which they had got wind. It was General Burnside's plan that General Edward Ferrero's division of colored
officers concerned in laying out and constructing these works. The engineers planned the regular entrenchments and approaches as far as possible, but, because of the multiplicity of duties devolving upon them, much of this work was delegated to other officers, who closely followed the plans indicated on the maps furnished. At noon, on June 25th, a mine was begun by the troops in front of Petersburg. This was not undertaken by engineer troops, but was under the direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pleasants, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was executed by his own men. General Meade and General Grant sanctioned the project, and plans were adopted for an assault on the entire Confederate line when the mine should explode. The majority of the men employed in the work were miners from the coal regions of Pennsylvania, and the necessary expedients were familiar to them, without special instructions from the engineers. The excavation was commenced without special tools, lumb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
front, and as early as the 24th Lieutenant-Colonel Pleasants' testimony.--Ib., p. 112. of June, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pleasants, commanding the First brigade of that division, a man of resolutere was approved, and at 12 o'clock next day, Pleasants began work, selecting for the service his owossible to get assistance from anybody, says Pleasants, with an indignation almost pathetic; I had tion, &c., of the mine are based on Lieutenant-Colonel Pleasants' official report, August, 1864. Frofinished, official brows began to relax, and Pleasants asking for 12,000 pounds of powder, got 8,00In eleven minutes now the mine will explode, Pleasants reports to Burnside at thirty-three minutes t the result. It lacks a minute yet, says Pleasants, looking at his watch. Not a second, cries it floats away to meet the morning sun. Pleasants has done his work with terrible completenessof General Grant--Ib., p. 110; Meade, p. 36; Pleasants, p. 116. As regards the men passing from con[1 more...]
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