hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 56 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Poe or search for Poe in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
the war, and in whose death the State had felt that she had lost a young soldier of brilliant promise. Lieutenant James Stuart, who had distinguished himself in Mexico and was killed by the Indians in 1851. Kearney, who was to die before our division but three days after, was now forming his line for another determined effort to turn our left and drive us from the position we had held all day. General Gordon says: Army of Virginia, Gordon, page 274. The Federal line was formed with Poe's brigade on the right, Birney on the left, and Robinson in reserve. Before it were the six brigades of A. P. Hill's division and one of Ewell's in two lines. Hill held the most important point of Jackson's lineā€”his left. He had been entrusted with this defence because Jackson knew that his zeal and courage in the Southern cause was equal to his own. Notwithstanding this disparity of numbers, General Kearney, without hesitation, gave the command to assault the enemy. The brave Federal tr