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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Polignac or search for Polignac in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
gagement, which order caused a good deal of animated (but private) discussion. It is appropriate at this point to quote again from the letter of the Southern soldier already quoted from: The enemy showed less enterprise than I have ever known them to evince. Banks is clearly no commander. Once or twice while he was at Alexandria, the posture of our forces was such that by a sure and comparatively safe movement of ten thousand men he might have insured, beyond peradventure, the capture of Polignac's division. He must have been in the main aware of the position and strength of our forces. Here is another extract from Captain Burns: The above view is a fair reflection of our own. We, too, felt that General Banks had given up all desire to acquit himself with any credit, and showed an unaccountable lack of enterprise. Of course, we knew nothing as to the certain result above predicted, of the sure and comparatively safe movement of ten thousand men. But having about, that num
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
ery formidable vessel for such operations. On the 29th of February the expedition proceeded up the Red River into the Black. as far as the town of Trinity, where they were attacked by a battery of field-pieces, under the Confederate General, Polignac, the town at the same time hanging out white flags. The gun-boats returned the enemy's fire and soon drove them away. The fire of the Ouichita is said to have been withering, and the astonishment of the Confederate commander may be well imageach gun a minute, the shells and shrapnel bursting in all directions and tearing the village almost to pieces. On the following day the expedition proceeded up the river to within two miles of Harrisonburg, where it was again attacked by General Polignac, with a large number of sharp-shooters and some 12-pound rifleguns, from behind the levee. The fire of the guns was directed chiefly upon the Hindman, the flag-ship, and she was struck twenty-seven times by shot and shell, one shot disablin