Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

ttanooga, which he reached ahead of Buell's vanguard. Bragg's army had been swelled by conscription to some 45,000 men, organized in three corps, under Hardee, Bishop Polk, and Kirby Smith respectively, whereof the last was sent to Knoxville, while the two former sufficed to hold Chattanooga against any effort which Buell was like advance division were sharply engaged with the enemy not long afterward. Bragg was present in person; but his forces were commanded more immediately by Maj.-Gen. Bishop Polk, who had in hand five divisions--two under Hardee, and those of Patton Anderson, Cheatham, and Buckner — that of Withers having been sent by Bragg, the daycloths and other precious goods, for which transportation over the rough mountain roads necessarily traversed was not to be had. The retreat was conducted by Bishop Polk, and covered by Wheeler's cavalry. And, though Kentucky was minus many thousands of animals, with other spoils of all kinds, by reason of this gigantic raid, i
Bishop Polk.--Of General Bishop Polk, the Nashville Times speaks in the following terms: He was a selfish, egotistical, vain-glorious, shallow man, who had no sympathy whatever with those who were outside of his aristocratic circle. He looked on his slaves in the same light that Fielding's Parson Trullaber looked on his fat hogs, and prized their bodies a good deal more than the souls of his sheep. Indeed, the sheep of his pastorate grazed not tender grass, or succulent clover, but polk General Bishop Polk, the Nashville Times speaks in the following terms: He was a selfish, egotistical, vain-glorious, shallow man, who had no sympathy whatever with those who were outside of his aristocratic circle. He looked on his slaves in the same light that Fielding's Parson Trullaber looked on his fat hogs, and prized their bodies a good deal more than the souls of his sheep. Indeed, the sheep of his pastorate grazed not tender grass, or succulent clover, but polk weed. Of them it might be said in the words of Milton's Lycidas: The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed, But swoln with wind, and the rank mist they draw, Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread: Besides what the grim wolf with privy paw Daily devours apace, and nothing sed. His preaching was, of course, execrable. Those who have unfortunately been compelled to listen to his discourses say that they would rather be shot at by his cannons in the field than listen to his church canon
cided repulse. The United States revenue cutter Harriet Lane arrived at Philadelphia on Sunday afternoon, to undergo repairs. Fort Lafayette is still being patronized by persons acting illegally for the rebels and against the Government of the United States. This noted watering-place will soon become the Old Point of New York, without the comfort of the one in Virginia. The news from Cairo is very important. It is reported that the rebel forces at Columbus, Ky., under General Bishop Polk, have increased to thirteen regiments of infantry, six field batteries, a siege battery, three battalions of cavalry, three steamers, and a gun-boat. Jeff. Thompson's rebels still remain at Belmont, Mo. From the Washington Star of Tuesday evening we copy the following: From over the river. We have information from every point of our lines on the other side of the river, up to 12 M. to-day. Nothing worthy of record had transpired there in the last twenty-four hours. Al
kinridge and Powell, ex-Gove. Morehead and others, are exerting their utmost to prevent the legislative endorsement of the formation of military camps in the State. A call for additional volunteers is urged by more decided Unionists. The Confederate examining officer at the State line has stated to travelers over the Louisiana and Nashville Railroad, that he took $250,000 in gold from passengers coming North within ten days. Frankfort, Ky., Sept. 9. --A dispatch from the rebel General Polk to Governor Magoflin has been laid before the Legislature, stating that the had occupied Columbus and Hickman, Ky., on account of receiving reliable information that the Federal forces were about to occupy the said points. General Folk proposes substantially that the Federal and Confederate forces shall be simultaneously withdrawn from Kentucky and enter into stipulation to respect the neutrality of the State. The case of Mr. Sullivan, one of the political prisoners at Fort Lafayett
General Bishop Polk. --The Rev. Mr. Talbot, of Columbus, Ky., relates that while General Polk's army occupied Columbus he, "desiring to improve his opportunities for usefulness among his political enemies, consulted the General as to the propriety of an application to the American Bible Society for a box of Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among the 'Confederate' soldiers. The ex-Bishop approved the suggestion very cordially, but was decidedly of the opinion that the application General Polk's army occupied Columbus he, "desiring to improve his opportunities for usefulness among his political enemies, consulted the General as to the propriety of an application to the American Bible Society for a box of Bibles and Testaments, to be distributed among the 'Confederate' soldiers. The ex-Bishop approved the suggestion very cordially, but was decidedly of the opinion that the application would be refused. It was, however, made out in due form, and sent to Cairo under a flag of truce. Thence it went forward to New York, and the donation was promptly granted by the society. The strangest part of the story, however, remains to be told. When the box containing these Bibles and Testaments reached Cairo, it was, upon examination. "pronounced contraband of war and stopped. It was not allowed to reach its destination."