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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
their home with an aunt. He published a book, but it did not prove a monetary success, and left him in worse circumstances than before. Stonewall Jackson left his wife and daughter without means, but they were reasonably helped by legacies. General Polk left nothing to his family, but his son, Dr. Polk, located in New York, and built up a very large and profitable practice. General Forrest, who became a farmer, labored hard to succeed as a planter, but at his death left only a meagre inheritDr. Polk, located in New York, and built up a very large and profitable practice. General Forrest, who became a farmer, labored hard to succeed as a planter, but at his death left only a meagre inheritance to his family. Mrs. General Ewell, who died three days after her husband, owned a very considerable property in St. Louis, and maintained a very comfortable establishment. General Bragg left no property, and his widow went to live with her sister in New Orleans. General Hood was far from being wealthy, and General S. Cooper was absolutely poor. Major-General Whiting, of Fort Fisher fame, who died in prison in 1864, left nothing, and General L. M. Walker, killed by Marmaduke in a duel, l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
. 5, ‘62. Sep. 3, ‘62, ordered to report to General Polk, Dec. 31, ‘62, 26th Alabama Regiment, April's army. April 5th, ordered to report to General Polk; by him ordered to duty in 29th North Caroladquarters A. T. Ordered to report to Lieutenant-General Polk, May 31, ‘63, 27th Mississippi Regimeirector, June 3, ‘63. Ordered to report to General Polk. June 30, ‘63, Polk's escort and headquartetanooga, Sept. 3, ‘62, ordered to report to General Polk, April 21, ‘63, reported at Medical-Directo63, 13th Tenn., Regiment, March 19, ‘63, by General Polk. Feb. 29, ‘64, 13th and 154th Tennessee Reg1st Arkansas, Aug. 27, ordered to report to General Polk, Dec. 31, ‘62, Senior Surgeon 1st Brigade, 20, ‘62. April 14, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Polk, Aug. 14, ‘63, assigned to 26th Alabama Regi from 25th Aug. ‘62, ordered to report to Major-Gen. Polk. Nov. 30, ‘62, ordered to Talladega, Ala. 28, ‘63. July 31, ‘63, Superintendent Vaccin., Polk's Corps, Aug. 31, ‘63, in charge Shipping and F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ntine Marsh, a Waterloo, and an Appomattox. A great young nation was extinguished like a dying star. A whole people, genius, valor, patriotism and renown, went down in calamity and ruin. Does not Providence cast down the great, the gifted, and the good to demonstrate virtue, and to instruct us to be careless of fortune? A soldier must take his fate, whether it comes with death, as it did to Charles XII, to Wallerstein, to Gustavus Adolphus, to Hampden and Sidney, to Jackson and Stuart, to Polk, to Cleburne, to Pegram and Pelham, to Wolfe, to Warren, and Sidney Johnston; whether it comes by wounds, as to Joe Johnston and Ewell, whether in gloom and disaster, as to Hannibal, to Napoleon, to Lee and Early. But the deed lives. What did he dare? What did he do? Ad parebat quo nihil iniquiusest ex eventua famam habiturum, said Livy of old, of one who got fame, not from his own deed, but from happy deliverance, and who, in the chance medley and motley wear of this tumultuous sphere, h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
t, 377. North Carolina, University of, 84. O'Ferrall, Gov., Chas. T. His Staff at the Unveiling of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 343. Page, Lt., Mann, 308. Parker, M. D., Major Wm. W., 127. Peace Convention, Chief-Justice. Chase on the, 25. Pearson, Frank, a gallant Federal, 126. Petersburg, Va., Evacuation of, April 3, 1865, by Hon. Chas. F. Collier, 69. Picayune, N. O., La., The, cited, I, 388. Pickett Camp, C. V., 54, 98, 106. Pocahontas, Tribute to, 57. Polk, Lt.-Gen. L., at Cassville, 1. Pollard, Commander, Thos. P., 386. Prison Experience of a Confederate Officer, by Col. A. Fulkerson, 127. Raleigh, N. C., Monument to the Confederate Dead at, 81. Randolph, Major Norman V., 387. Records and Relics of the Confederate States— National Repository for—Richmond the place, 387. Revolution, The first, losses in its battles, 40. Reynolds, Gen., Joseph, 68. Richardson, Hon., David Crockett, 353, 355, 358. Richmond, a City of Monument