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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 55 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 1 1 Browse Search
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jor Charles F. Allen. One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, Captain Charles R. Anderson. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred Neafie. One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New York (2), Captain Alfred Cooley. One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York (battalion), Captain Charles McCarthey. One Hundred and Seventy-sixth New York, Major Charles Lewis. Fourth brigade: Colonel David Shunk. Eighth Indiana (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander J. Kenny. Eighth Indiana (2), Major John R. Polk. Eighteenth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel William S. Charles. Twenty-fourth Iowa (1), Lieutenant-Colonel John Q. Wilds. Twenty-fourth Iowa (2), Captain Leander Clark. Twenty-fourth Iowa (3), Major Edward Wright. Twenty-eighth Iowa (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Bartholomew W. Wilson. Twenty-eighth Iowa (2), Major John Meyer. artillery: Maine Light Artillery, First Battery (A) (1), Lieutenant Eben D. Haley. Maine Light Artillery, First Battery (A) (2), Lieutenant John S. Snow. reserve ar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
army was forming in front of them. The left of Polk's corps occupied the west face of the intrenchmss the Oostenaula about midnight,--Hardee's and Polk's corps by the railroad and trestle bridges, anivision from Dodge's corps. The height held by Polk was carried, and the position intrenched under my would follow each road, it was arranged that Polk's corps should engage the column on the direct Its length was equal to the front of Hood's and Polk's and half of Hardee's corps. They were placedld-pieces freely. During the evening Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hood, the latter being spokesman, was placed with its center at New Hope Church, Polk's on his left, and Hardee's prolonging the linebliquely to it, and attack at dawn — Hardee and Polk to join in the battle successively as the succe (not reported); Hardee's corps, 286; Loring's (Polk's), 522,--total, 808. This, no doubt, is a trussippi and east Louisiana given me by Lieutenant-General Polk, just from the command of that depart[9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opening of the Atlanta campaign. (search)
; and it may not be improper to put on record an account of those affairs, and thereby correct the unintentional mistakes in the meager statements given above. The winter having ended, and all possible preparations having been made, the operations known as the Dalton-Atlanta campaign opened on May 5th, 1864, by the advance of General Thomas on Tunnel Hill, and on May 7th the withdrawal of our forces within Mill Creek Gap marked the beginning of the long retreat. Including the corps of General Polk, then under orders to join him, General Johnston had under his command, available for strategic purposes, between 65,000 and 70,000 men of all arms. It was a superb army of veterans, with implicit confidence in its general, and capable of great achievements. Deficient to a certain extent in supplies, it had enough for any possible movement its commander might order. Being a Confederate army, it necessarily was inferior to the army before it in numbers, equipment, and supplies. This wa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
1542 prisoners captured from Hood and Hardee, shown by increase of absent without leave in their corps, account for the remainder, without examining the returns of Polk's corps and the cavalry. General Johnston's army reached its maximum strength on the New Hope Church line, where he must have had 75,000 for battle when the armpied, but no attempt was made to retake it. In his official report, made in October, 1864, he says that at 9 o'clock at night of May 14th he learned that Lieutenant-General Polk's troops had lost a position commanding our bridges. Comment upon the generalship that would leave a position commanding the line of retreat of an army igallant charge of two brigades of the Fifteenth Corps of the Union army. Reenforced by another brigade, they held it against the repeated and desperate efforts of Polk's men to retake it. The battle lasted far into the night. General John A. Logan, in his official report of it, says that when at 10 o'clock at night the last body
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
corps. After having established communication with the corps and the cavalry of the army during the forepart of the night, I found myself upon the morning of the 19th in readiness to fulfill the grave duties devolving upon me. Our troops had awakened in me heartfelt sympathy, as I had followed their military career with deep interest from early in May of that year. I had witnessed their splendid condition at that period; had welcomed with pride the fine body of reinforcements under General Polk; but, with disappointment, I had seen them, day after day, turn their back upon the enemy, and lastly cross the Chattahoochee River on the night of the 9th of July with one-third of their number lost — the men downcast, dispirited, and demoralized. Stragglers and deserters, the captured and killed, could not now, however, be replaced by recruits, because all the recruiting depots had been drained to reinforce either Lee or Johnston. I could, therefore, but make the best dispositions in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Sooy Smith expedition (February, 1864). (search)
ind it, and I considered ourselves pledged to receive and protect them. In a letter of July 9th, 1.875 [Sherman, Vol. I., Appendix, p. 453], General Smith says: To have attempted to penetrate farther into the enemy's country, with the cavalry of Polk's army coming up to reinforce Forrest, would have insured the destruction of my entire command, situated as it was. The Cavalry of Polk's Army refers to the command of General S. D. Lee which joined Forrest within a day or two after Smith began hed ourselves pledged to receive and protect them. In a letter of July 9th, 1.875 [Sherman, Vol. I., Appendix, p. 453], General Smith says: To have attempted to penetrate farther into the enemy's country, with the cavalry of Polk's army coming up to reinforce Forrest, would have insured the destruction of my entire command, situated as it was. The Cavalry of Polk's Army refers to the command of General S. D. Lee which joined Forrest within a day or two after Smith began his retreat.--editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
A. Dresel; 25th La., Col. F. C. Zacharie; 30th La., Maj. A. Picolet; 4th La. Battalion, Capt. T. A. Bisland; 14th La. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Lieut. A. T. Martin. Holtzlaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. T. Holtzclaw: 18th Ala., Lieut.-Col. P. F. Hunley; 32d and 58th Ala., Col. Bushrod Jones; 36th Ala., Capt. N. M. Carpenter; 38th Ala., Capt. C. E. Bussey. Artillery Battalion (Eldridge's), Capt. C. E. Fenner: Ala. Battery, Capt. W. J. McKenzie; Miss. Bat'y, Lieut. J. S. McCall. Stewart's Corps (Polk's), Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Capt. O. D. Hughes; 3d Miss., Capt. O. H. Johnston; 22d Miss., Maj. M. A. Oatis; 31st Miss., Capt. R. A. Collins; 33d Miss., Capt. T. L. Cooper; 40th Miss., Col. W. B. Colbert; 1st Miss. Batt'n, Maj. J. M. Stigler. Adams's Brigade, Col. Robert Lowry: 6th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Thomas J. Borden; 14th Miss., Col. W. L. Doss; 15th Miss., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Bi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
; 159th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William Waltermire. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 171; m, 97 = 287. Third Brigade, Col. Daniel Macauley, Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie: 38th Mass., Maj. Charles F. Allen; 128th N. Y., Capt. Charles R. Anderson; 156th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alfred Neafie, Captain Alfred Cooley; 175th N. Y. (batt'n), Capt. Charles McCarthey; 176th N. Y., Maj. Charles Lewis. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 87; m, 191 = 298. Fourth Brigade, Co]. David Shunk: 8th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Alexander J. Kenny, Maj. John R. Polk; 18th Ind., Lieut.-Col. William S. Charles; 24th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. John Q. Wilds, Capt. Leander Clark, Maj. Edward Wright; 28th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Bartholomew W. Wilson, Maj. John Meyer. Brigade loss: k, 26; w, 200; m, 103 = 329. Artillery: 1st Me., Lieut. Eben D. Haley, Lieut. John S. Snow. Artillery loss: k, 3; w, 17; m, 8 = 28. Reserve artillery, Maj. Albert W. Bradbury: 17th Ind., Lieut. Hezekiah Hinkson; D, 1st R. I., Lieut. Fred'k Chase. Artillery Reserve loss: k, 5; w, 17