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The First Kansas regiment, which was sent from Sedalia, Mo., arrived at Lexington and arrested several of the most prominent and active rebels of the town, captured and destroyed about fifteen hundred hogs, which were being packed for the use of General Price's rebels, and took possession of a good deal of other valuable property.--National Intelligencer, January 16. In the United States Senate, the reports of the Judiciary Committee, in favor of the expulsion of Waldo P. Johnson and Trusten Polk, Senators from Missouri, were taken up and unanimously adopted. A copy of the resolutions for their expulsion was ordered to be sent to the Governor of Missouri.--New York Times, January 11. The first auction sale of confiscated cotton from Port Royal occurred in New York, under orders of the Government. There were seventy-nine bales in all, and the cotton sold at an average of nearly sixty cents per pound, with the exception of two out of the ten lots, (a very inferior quality), w
lso burned the Woodland Depot at Cave City, the Cave City Hotel, and stables. The citizens at all those points were notified, and escaped to Munfordville, as the rebels stated that they intended to return on Monday night and burn every house that could be used by the Union army in its advance as a hospital or quarters. They also burned up all the hay, oats, and fodder-stacks along the road, and drove off or killed all the cattle, horses, and mules to be found. A nephew of the rebel General Polk was arrested to-day near Blandville, Ky., by one of the National scouting parties. He had despatches in his possession to spies at Columbus, Ky.--N. Y. Herald, January 14. The United States sloop-of-war Pensacola ran the rebel batteries at Cockpit and Shipping Points, on the Potomac, this morning, and reached the open sea without having been touched by shot or shell. A Reconnoitering party under command of Lieutenant W. T. Truxton, U. S. N., left St. Helena Sound, S. C., day be
gomery, ascended the Combahee River, S. C., and succeeded in destroying a large quantity of rebel stores and other property.--(Doc. 1.) The bombardment of Vicksburgh continued. All the guns in position opened fire at midnight, and continued their fire until daylight this morning. After a short cessation the firing was renewed, and kept up all day.--the second party of recalcitrants left St. Louis for the South. They numbered seventeen, among whom were the wife and two daughters of Trusten Polk. A large meeting, to procure funds to send supplies to the wounded at Vicksburgh, was held at Chicago, Ill., at which nearly six thousand dollars were raised.--the schooner Echo was captured yesterday, in the Gulf of Mexico, by the United States steamer Sunflower.--A fight took place at Clinton, La., between the Union forces under the command of Colonel Grierson, and the rebel forces stationed in that town, resulting in the loss of twenty-one killed and wounded of the rebels, and a n
in the head. The rest fled. Major-General Dix issued general orders, thanking the troops quartered in the city of New York, during the difficulties consequent upon the draft, for their admirable discipline and soldierly deportment.--Colonel Trusten Polk, formerly United States Senator from Missouri, with his wife and daughter, was captured at Bolivar Landing, Arkansas, and delivered to General Buford, commanding at Helena. Colonel Polk was General Holmes's Judge-Advocate General, and was Major-General Dix issued general orders, thanking the troops quartered in the city of New York, during the difficulties consequent upon the draft, for their admirable discipline and soldierly deportment.--Colonel Trusten Polk, formerly United States Senator from Missouri, with his wife and daughter, was captured at Bolivar Landing, Arkansas, and delivered to General Buford, commanding at Helena. Colonel Polk was General Holmes's Judge-Advocate General, and was with the rebels at New Madrid.
k, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--24. Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Bright, Carlile, Cowan, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Rice, and Saulsbury--11. Mr. Clark, of New Hampshire, submitted July 25, 1861. the following: Be it ree Constitution. The House refused to suspend: Yeas 41; Nays 85. Mr. Waldo P. Johnson, Who, with his colleague, Trusten Polk, openly joined the Rebels soon afterward. of Mo., proposed (Aug. 5th) to add to the bill providing for an increase of ition was rejected by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Bayard, Breckinridge, Bright, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polk, Powell, and Saulsbury--9. Nays--Messrs. Baker, Browning, Carlile, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Cowan, Dixon, Doolittle, The amendment was agreed to, and the bill thereupon passed, as follows: Yeas 33; Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Kennedy, Polk, Powell, and Saulsbury--5. This bill was, the same day, reconsidered, and the above amendment, being moved afresh, was
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
treacherous. acts. Fortifications at Bolivar Point, Galveston Harbor, Tex., destroyed by the United States frigate Santee.—9. The Confederate Congress passed a bill admitting Kentucky into the Southern Confederacy.—20. Confederates destroyed about 100 miles of the North Missouri Railroad, with its stations, bridges, ties, fuel, water-tanks, and telegraph-poles.— 30. The banks of New York, Albany, Philadelphia, and Boston suspend specie payments. 1862.—Jan. 10. Waldo P. Johnson and Trusten Polk, of Missouri, expelled from the United States Senate.—11. Bridges of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad burned by the Confederates.—16. The Ohio legislature authorized the banks of that State to suspend specie payments.—17. Cedar Keys, Fla., captured by Union troops.—30. the Monitor launched.— Feb. 3. Confederate steamer Nashville ordered to leave Southampton (England) Harbor; the United States gunboat Tuscarora, starting in pursuit, stopped by the British frigate Shanno
rly history the island changed hands several times, the Dutch once owning it for a short time and England conquering it in 1762, but restoring it to Spain in return for Florida. In 1829 occurred the Black Eagle rebellion, which was directed from the United States, and only put down by Spain after three years fighting. In 1844 occurred the insurrection of the blacks. At the end of this rebellion 700 Cubans were put to death by torture, and the people of America became so aroused that President Polk offered Spain $100,000,000 for the island, but the offer was refused. In 1868, after the Spanish Revolution, another rebellion broke out on the island and lasted ten years. The revolutionists proclaimed a republic, and Spain, after spending $200,000,000 and sending over 50,000 troops, finding that she could not conquer the patriots, sent over Gen. Martinez Campos, who, by promises, induced the patriots to lay down their arms. Spain's promises were never fulfilled. In December, 1894,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
W. Boggsterm beginsNov., 1836 Thomas Reynolds (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1840 M. M. MarmadukeactingFeb. 9, 1844 John C. Edwards (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1844 Austin A. King (Dem.)term beginsNov., 1848 Sterling Price (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1852 Trusten Polk (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1856 Hancock JacksonactingMarch, 1857 Robert M. Stewart (Dem.)term beginsDec., 1857 Claiborne F. Jackson (Dem.)term beginsJan. 4, 1861 H. R. Gamble (provisional)electedJuly 31, 1861 Willard P. HallactingJan. 31, 18631 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Senate, United States (search)
n future. The attack on Charles Sumner occurred in the Senate chamber after the body had adjourned, and the offending party was not a member of the Senate. The Senate has exercised its power of explusion five times. William Blount, a Senator from Tennessee, was expelled July 8, 1797, for complicity in a scheme to transfer New Orleans and adjacent territory from Spain to Great Britain. John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, was expelled Dec. 4, 1861, for participation in the Rebellion. Trusten Polk and Waldo P. Johnson, Senators from Missouri, were expelled Jan. 10, 1862, for aiding and abetting the Rebellion. Jesse D. Bright, of Indiana, was expelled on Feb. 5, 1862, for disloyalty in writing a letter to Jefferson Davis introducing a man who wanted to dispose of what he regards a great improvement in fire-arms. In connection with these expulsions for disloyalty it may be stated that the Senators from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Shepley, George Foster 1819- (search)
Shepley, George Foster 1819- Military officer; born in Saco, Me., Jan. 1, 1819; son of Chief-Justice Ether Shepley; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1837; studied at the Harvard Law School and at Portland; and began the practice of law at Bangor. President Polk appointed him United States district attorney, which post he held until 1861, when he became colonel of the 12th Maine Volunteers, and took part in General Butler's expedition against New Orleans. On the surrender of that city he was made its commandant. In July he became a brigadier-general, and was military governor of Louisiana from July 2, 1862, until 1864. On the surrender of Richmond (April, 1865), he was made military governor of that city. He resigned in July, and resumed the practice of law in Portland. In 1869 he was appointed United States circuit judge for the first circuit, and held the office till his death in Portland, Me., July 20, 1878.
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