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killed and wounded on Sunday alone. I cannot give as complete a report as I could wish, not having yet received a report from the different commands engaged. On Tuesday evening, at seven P. M., I was again placed in command. By this time General Polk had crossed the river ten miles above, with the right wing of Bragg's army, and coming down on the north side, took up a position on the river hills commanding our works; the left wing under Hardee, having taken position on the hills on the solate for further attack except by assault, which I felt able to repel. By this time I had got telegraphic communication with Louisville, and immediately telegraphed General Gilbert in substance that we had held the enemy, said to be Bragg's and Polk's whole army, at bay all day; that evidently fresh columns were being moved against us, and whether we should be able to continue to hold our position without assistance remained to be seen; that we should do the best we could. I received an answ
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
killed and wounded on Sunday alone. I cannot give as complete a report as I could wish, not having yet received a report from the different commands engaged. On Tuesday evening, at seven P. M., I was again placed in command. By this time General Polk had crossed the river ten miles above, with the right wing of Bragg's army, and coming down on the north side, took up a position on the river hills commanding our works; the left wing under Hardee, having taken position on the hills on the solate for further attack except by assault, which I felt able to repel. By this time I had got telegraphic communication with Louisville, and immediately telegraphed General Gilbert in substance that we had held the enemy, said to be Bragg's and Polk's whole army, at bay all day; that evidently fresh columns were being moved against us, and whether we should be able to continue to hold our position without assistance remained to be seen; that we should do the best we could. I received an answ
er and Doctor's Fork also gave the enemy every advantage for concealing and massing large bodies of troops. I was assailed by, at least, three divisions. I have since been reliably informed that Gen. Bragg commanded the enemy in person, and that Polk's and Hardee's corps were present upon the field. Thus ends my account of the part taken by my corps in the battle of Chaplin Hills, the bloodiest battle of modern times, for the number of troops engaged on our side. Rousseau had present on thffering intensely for want of water, having been scantily supplied for a day or two, but they fought it bravely and against three or four times their number of the best soldiers of the rebel army, and under the direction and eye of Bragg, Buckner, Polk, Cheatham, and other prominent Generals of the rebel army. If of the old troops any man flinched, I do not know it, and have not heard of it, and very few men of the undisciplined new regiments behaved badly. I had an opportunity of seeing and k
vily in his rear, near Perryville, Major-General Hardee, of Polk's command, was obliged to halt and check him at that point. — the army of the Mississippi, now under command of Major-General Polk--Cheatham's, Buckner's and Anderson's, and directed Gen. Polk to take the command on the seventh, and attack the enemy the next morning. Withers's division had gone the day befoved early next morning, to be present at the operations of Polk's command. The two armies were formed confronting each ose loss will be severely felt by their commands. To Major-General Polk, commanding the forces, Major-General Hardee, commanconflict with a reenforced army of the enemy, Gen. Bragg or Polk ordered our army back to Harrodsburgh. We captured all tck on Monday morning, thirteenth instant, Col. Tyler left Gen. Polk, and of subsequent events he is of course not advised. hese troops in this bloody conflict would fill a volume. Polk, Cheatham, Donelson, and all our leaders were every where s