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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

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icant. The results of the expedition were important; the railroad being broken so thoroughly as to cut off all rolling stock north of Booneville, and to place at the service of General Halleck's army the cars and locomotives of which the retreating Confederates were now so much in need. In addition, we burned twenty-six cars containing ten thousand stand of small arms, three pieces of artillery, a great quantity of clothing, a heavy supply of ammunition, and the personal baggage of General Leonidas Polk. A large number of prisoners, mostly sick and convalescent, also fell into our hands; but as we could not carry them with us — such a hurried departure was an immediate necessity, by reason of our critical situation — the process of paroling them was not contempleted, and they doubtless passed back to active service in the Confederacy, properly enough unrecognized as prisoners of war by their superiors. In returning, the columns marched back by another indirect route to its old
-Seventh Illinois, who succeeded to his brigade, was mortally wounded a few minutes later. I had now on the death-roll three brigade commanders, and the loss of subordinate officers and men was appalling, but their sacrifice had accomplished the desired result; they had not fallen in vain. Indeed, the bravery and tenacity of my division gave to Rosecrans the time required to make new dispositions, and exacted from our foes the highest commendations. [extract from report of Lieutenant-General L. Polk.] Major-General Withers's left was opposed to the right of General Sheridan, commanding the third and remaining division of General McCook's corps. The enemy's right was strongly posted on a ridge of rocks, with chasms intervening, and covered with a dense growth of rough cedars. Being advised of the attack he was to expect by the fierce contest which was being waged on his right, he was fully prepared for the onset, and this notice and the strength of his position enabled him