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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 76 results in 13 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
es were accordingly withdrawn to Lafayette, and Polk's and Walker's corps were moved immediately in rection, on the afternoon of the 12th Lieutenant-General Polk, commanding the advance forces, was d Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12th. Lieutenant-General Polk: General,—I enclose you a dispatchyette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept 12th, 1863. Lieutenant-General Polk, Commanding Corps: General,—I enclhe left, and press the enemy up the stream from Polk's front at Lee and Gordon's mills. IV. Polkd Buckner's corps, with Cheatham's division, of Polk's, had crossed and formed, when a brisk engageme two senior Lieutenant Generals—Longstreet and Polk. The former to the left, where all his own tro line, just in front of my position. Lieutenant-General Polk was ordered to assail the enemy on ou and crossed the river under a heavy fire. General Polk crossed the river on the same boat with ourto the venerable and accomplished widow of President Polk—our pleasant visit to the splendid grounds[17 more.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
es were accordingly withdrawn to Lafayette, and Polk's and Walker's corps were moved immediately in rection, on the afternoon of the 12th Lieutenant-General Polk, commanding the advance forces, was d Lafayette, Ga., 6 P. M., Sept. 12th. Lieutenant-General Polk: General,—I enclose you a dispatchhe left, and press the enemy up the stream from Polk's front at Lee and Gordon's mills. IV. PolkPolk will press his forces to the front of Lee and Gordon's mills, and if met by too much resistance to length dispatched a staff-officer to Lieutenant-General Polk to ascertain the cause of the delay, ngers were immediately dispatched for Lieutenant-General Polk, and he shortly after joined me, my oorders were immediately dispatched to Lieutenant-General Polk, to again assault the enemy in his fright and soon dispatched a staff officer to General Polk, urging a prompt and vigorous execution of . On my arrival, about sunrise, near Lieutenant-General Polk's bivouac, I met the ever vigilant Ge[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
erate camp, and the enemy had captured our battery. At this critical juncture, our big gun opened on them, and threw their lines into confusion. Under a terrific cannonade, we marched to the steamer and crossed the river under a heavy fire. General Polk crossed the river on the same boat with our regiment, and as the balls were falling thick and fast around us, a soldier said to him: All right, General, we will have those guns turned in the other direction in a few minutes. Yes, he said, Youead through the New Testament. November 11th.—A cold raw day. The enemy were reported landing in force a few miles above here, and we prepared for warm work. A fearful accident happened this morning. Our big gun burst, and killed ten men. General Polk barely escaped with his life. November 13th.—Our prisoners returned from Cairo this evening, and say that the enemy will attack Columbus very soon. General Pillow's division commenced to move to-day, but for some reason, the order was coun
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
this place. It was heard with the greatest delight by the troops, and excited general enthusiasm. In the afternoon, the men were ordered to prepare entrenchments, which they did under the heavy fire of the enemy. To the chagrin of all, that very night at 10 o'clock an order came to fall back. This sudden change of intention was at that time a mystery, but in his official report General Johnston has stated the cause. General Hood had said that he could not hold his part of the line; General Polk that he did not think he could hold his; while Hardee, who held the weakest part of the whole line, was of the opinion that he could hold his. On the morning of the 20th the line of retreat was taken up across the Etowah river to Alatoona, and thence to New Hope Church, near Dallas. On the 25th the enemy moved up and charged the greater part of the line, but were repulsed with heavy loss at every point. The Third Maryland was not engaged till late in the evening, when it did terrible
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
General Bragg than any other prominent Confederate officer. That he was unselfish, patriotic, and devoted to our cause, few who knew him will doubt. He has been very severely criticised for failing, it is said, to avail himself of opportunities afforded him by the enemy just previous to and during the battle of Chicamauga. There are many living officers and men who know how little of blame should have attached to him for Hindman's palpable disobedience of order in McLemore's Cove, and General Polk's failure to attack Crittenden's corps in its isolated position, immediately after Hindman's fiasco. The September No. 1881, of the Southern Historical Society Papers contains an interesting and eloquent address of Colonel Archer Anderson at the annual reunion of the Virginia Division of the Army of Northern Virginia. After describing quite graphically and correctly the topography of McLemore's Cove and the singular dispersion of Rosecrans's army, Colonel Anderson says: Surely i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
l B. F. Cheatham and others, were assigned elegant apartments at the Maxwell House, and during our whole stay were treated with the enthusiastic cordiality which old Confederates know so well how to bestow. Of our visit to the Governor (the gallant General W. B. Bate), and the House and Senate (both of which bodies adjourned to be introduced to the General), our inspection of the beautiful capitol building, the library, etc.,—our charming visit to the venerable and accomplished widow of President Polk—our pleasant visit to the splendid grounds and buildings of Vanderbilt University—our drives around the beautiful city, and the thousand courtesies shown us on every side—we may not now speak. A magnificent audience greeted General Lee at Masonic theatre to-night (the 15th of March), and nowhere has his lecture been more warmly appreciated, or generously applauded. Ex-Governor Porter introduced General Lee in very fitting and appropriate style. After the lecture, there was a rece
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
ry could not say they knew nothing of defensive warfare, but certainly it was always more to their inclination to take the aggressive, and at Drewry's Bluff Suwarrow's tactics of Stupay, Ibey (advance and strike), was the order of the day, and with his army badly beaten, old Ben Butler was bottled. In the west the guns of the Fifth Company were engaged at Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain aad Kennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines had crept surely
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
esteemed office in the corps. He was not a hard student, though a fair one. His quickness supplied the defect. He did not have an enemy in the corps or an unkind feeling to any one, though he was select in his associates. He graduated at the Military Academy in June, 1826, and was assigned to the Second Infantry, with the rank of brevet Second Lieutenant, to take date from July 1, 1826, and furloughed until November 1. He had as his companions and friends at the Academy such men as Leonidas Polk, of Tennessee, subsequently Bishop of Louisiana and a LieutenantGen-eral in the Confederate service, who was his room-mate and intimate friend. Robert Anderson, afterward famous for his defense of Fort Sumter; William Bickley, his fellow-townsman; Daniel S. Donelson, of Tennessee, a distinguished Brigadier-General in the Confederate army; Berrien, of Georgia; the veteran Maynadier Bradford, a grandson of the first printer in Kentucky; Lucien Bibb, son of the Hon. George M. Bibb, and Mr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
s division has been ordered to reinforce our troops, but I am disposed to believe that it is the advance of our retreat. Dark clouds are hovering over our young Republic, but we must struggle on, trusting in God for the success of our cause. General Polk, it is said, has received a dispatch to the effect that France has recognized the Confederate States. March 3d.—Jackson, Tennessee. On last Thursday I was detailed for picket duty. Soon afterwards the regiment was ordered to pack up baggae enemy are reported advancing in force on that place. The regiment arrived at 3 o'clock. March 20th.—This morning we were ordered to leave our baggage in an old shop, and march back to Purdy with the Second Tennessee regiment, and two guns of Polk's battery. Sunday—March 23d.—Have spent the past few days in the old College building at Purdy, lolling about lazily and indifferent to surrounding circumstances. The weather has been cold, dark and dreary, and my spirits are in sympathy with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
the destined point in time. Resting for the night in order of battle, a short distance from the enemy's camp, with only now and then a picket shot to relieve the suspense, we commenced to advance at early dawn, and by sunrise came fairly upon them. Hardie commanded the front line, with Gladden's and Chalmers's brigades of Bragg's corps on his right, Bragg's corps, less the two brigades above-mentioned, constituting the second line, followed about four hundred yards distant. The corps of General Polk, following the second line at the distance of about eight hundred yards, in lines of brigades, deployed with their batteries in rear of each, protected by cavalry on their right. The reserves under General Breckenridge followed closely the third line in the same order, its right wing supported by cavalry. Well do I remember, being then Adjutant of the Tenth Mississippi infantry, of Chalmers's brigade, how all were spoiling for their maiden fight, in which, before they were through, they
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