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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
military rank held by a University man was that of Lieutenant-General. This was attained by Leonidas Polk under a commission dated Oct. 10, 1862. Gen. Polk was outranked in length of service only byGen. Polk was outranked in length of service only by Longstreet and Kirby-Smith. He had been made Major-General on June 25, 1861; he was the second person to attain this rank, and, of the 99 Major Generals in the service, was, with one exception, theeral arrived the day after his death. In the Atlanta campaign she lost nine; including Lieutenant-General Polk. At Bentonsville, the last battle in North Carolina, and the last struggle of Johnston the University was called on to give more than her share to the sacrifice, in the person of Leonidas Polk. She lost besides, Lieutenant-General Polk, four Brigadier-Generals, Anderson, Branch, GarrLieutenant-General Polk, four Brigadier-Generals, Anderson, Branch, Garrott and Pettigrew, eleven colonels, nine lieutenantcolo-nels and eight majors. This University claims further, more than her proportion of the commanders of North Carolina regiments that became di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
We returned from Kentucky through Cumberland Gap, Knoxville, Chattanooga and Bridgeport to Allisonia, in Franklin county, Tenn., where my division was halted for a fortnight. During this time I visited for the first time in many years the grave of my father at Craggy Hope. From Allisonia the army proceeded to Shelbyville, where we halted ten days, and thence to Eagleville, where, in December, my division was broken up and I was assigned to the command of a brigade in Withers's division of Polk's corps. This brigade was the one formerly commanded by Brigadier-General Frank Gardner. I was only in command of it a few days when Rozecrans advanced upon Murfreesboro, where General Bragg determined to give him battle, and for this purpose took his line of battle on the 27th of December about a mile and a half from Murfreesboro on the Nashville and Wilkinson pikes. The morning of the day on which the line was taken up I was transferred to the command temporarily of Walthall's brigade
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An important Dispatch. (search)
lleā€”have been on the point of Missionary Ridge. Can see Chattanooga and everything around. The enemy's trains are leaving, going around the point of Lookout Mountain. The prisoners captured, report two pontoons thrown across for the purpose of retreating. I think they are evacuating as hard as they can go. They are cutting timber down to obstruct our passage. I think we ought to press forward as rapidly as possible. Respectfully, etc., N. B. Forrest. Brigadier-General. To Lieutenant-General L. Polk. (Please forward to General Bragg.) At the time this dispatch was written the Union army was not at Chattanooga, but was in line, fully prepared for battle in Rossville Gap, and upon Missionary Ridge to the right and left of this gap, with one of its three corps extending across the valley, nearly to Lookout Mountain. It was, therefore, directly in General Forrest's front, and only a mile distant. The position it occupied could not have been carried by direct assault. The ar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
ose, and at about 5:45 P. M. I surrendered them and myself prisoners of war. In his report dated April 12, page 550, General James R. Chalmers says: About a quarter of an hour after the surrender some of our troops, supposed to be of General Polk's division, made their appearance on the opposite side of the surrendered camp, and were with great difficulty prevented from firing upon the prisoners.* It was then about 4 o'clock in the evening, and after distributing ammunition we received orders from General Bragg to drive the enemy into the river. Major-General Leonidas Polk, in his report dated September, 1862, forwarded February 4, 1863, says, page 409: About 5 P. M. my line attacked the enemy's troops, the last that were left upon the field in an encampment on my right. The attack was made in front and flank. The resistance was sharp but short. The enemy perceiving he was flanked in a position completely turned, hoisted the white flag and surrendered. It prove
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
, but never bent. In official life, said Senator Reagan, his Postmaster-General, he knew no word but duty. A young man and an ambitious soldier, he refused President Polk's offer of a brigadier-generalship, because he thought the appointment exceeded the president's constitutional power. He answered thus the solicitations of f Flag, History and description of the Confederate, 117. Flournoy, Colonel T. S., 133. Ford, Captain N. P., 284. Forrest. Dispatch of General N. B., to General L. Polk, 92. Forts; Curtis, 197. Donelson, 197, 317. Fisher, 276, Henry, 198. Morris' Island, 228. Sumter, 14, 228. Franklin, Tenn., Carnage at battle of, 18grew, General J., 16, 260. Pickett, General George E., Appointment of to West Point; his characteristics, 151. Pickett, Mrs. La Salle Corbeil, 154. Polk, General, Leonidas, 130. Pope, Movements in the war of General John, 353. Pouncing on pickets, 213. Powell, C. H., 359. Randall, James R., 277 Rawlins, General John