hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
e Revolutionary patriots, Francis Nash and Joseph Warren, of Edward Buncombe and William Davidson, who taught us rebellion—and died in teaching us—and make answer: Every tree is known by his own fruit. The land that gave the rebels George Washington and Patrick Henry, Richard Caswell and Jethro Sumner to lead and counsel the men whom we commemorate in centennial celebrations, gave also in these latter days Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, Alexander Stephens and John C. Breckinridge, Leonidas Polk and Albert Sidney Johnston, worthy sons of noble sires. A good tree bringeth not forth corrupt fruit, neither doth a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. Behold in these men the true exponents of the South and her cause, the outgrowth of her civilization! Does any land show their superiors? By them, our exemplars, let us be judged. But why multiply words? Let the whole world contemn, still will we love and honor the voiceless dust that lies here-aye and all our patriot dea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
the three Confederate corps, commanded by Generals Polk, D. H. Hill and Buckner, were withdrawn toguard the passage in Pigeon mountain, while General Polk was summoned to make active operations agaiShell Mound. General Bragg's force consisted of Polk's Corps, 12,027 strong; D. H. Hill, 11,972; Buce planted his batteries to cover the crossing. Polk's Corps, in the meantime (Hindman's and Cheathants were culminating. Cheatham's Division of Polk's Corps had been ordered from Dalton's Ford to rly night, when he was ordered to report to General Polk, who instructed him to form in rear of his . The command of the right was assigned to General Polk, and that of the left to Longstreet. PolPolk's command embraced Hill's Corps, Walker's Reserve Corps and Cheatham's Division of his own corps, posed of Buckner's Corps, Hindman's Division of Polk's Corps, Johnson's Division, and Hood's and McLhall's Brigades were sent to the support of General Polk, and encountered an overwhelming force, bef
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's expedition from Vicksburg to Meridian, Feb. 3, to March 6, 1864 [from the New Orleans, la., Picayune, July 27, 1904.] (search)
,000 cavalry in west Tennessee was duly observed and reported to General Polk, commanding in Mississippi. Spies reported the force as consist to join his division under General W. H. Jackson. As soon as General Polk was fully advised of the large force under General Sherman, and not understand why Sherman had Meridian as his objective point. General Polk at the same time ordered General Ferguson's Brigade from the froempt was made by the cavalry to impede the march. On the 13th General Polk ordered General Lee to again get to the north of General Shermany retiring towards Marion station. On this date (February 14th) General Polk issued an order placing Major-General Stephen D. Lee in command In the meantime, February 17th, General Lee, under orders from General Polk, left only a few regiments to watch the army of General Sherman r and move into Mississippi. General Sherman was outgeneraled by General Polk, and the expedition was devoid of military interest, but was mos