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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
the future? God knows! June 5 Raining. The sudden booming of artillery, shelling our department boys, intrenching at Bottom's Bridge, was heard until bedtime. I have heard no results of yesterday's operations. All is quiet to-day, up to 9 A. M. Received a letter from Custis. I have not heard whether he received the food and blanket sent him yesterday; the latter, he says, was wanted badly the night before. He charges Fanny, as usual, to be regular in feeding and watering Polly, his parrot; and never to leave the door of his cage open, for fear he may fly away. June 6 Clear and hot, but with a fine breeze-southwest. All is quiet around the city. Saturday night the enemy again penetrated Gen. Breckinridge's line, and again were repulsed by the Floridians. Some of his regiments (as Mr. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, who stopped in front of my house yesterday, told me) did not behave well. Yesterday, I learn, both sides buried the dead, with the excep
cause so long held in abeyance he became more defiant each day. But in the very nature of things he dared not be as bold and out spoken as I. With him every word and sentence had to be weighed and its effects calculated, before being uttered: but with me that operation had to be reversed if done at all. An incident that occurred about this time will show how his views were broadening. Some time after the election of Trumbull a young negro, the son of a colored woman in Springfield known as Polly, went from his home to St. Louis and there hired as a hand on a lower Mississippi boat,--for what special service, I do not recollect,--arriving in New Orleans without what were known as free papers. Though born free he was subjected to the tyranny of the black code, all the more stringent because of the recent utterances of the Abolitionists in the North, and was kept in prison until his boat had left. Then, as no one was especially interested in him, he was forgotten. After a certain le
ted and suffer, approve and sympathize. It is common in cases of public calamity for those who feel the infliction, to seek for some object on which to throw the blame, and rarely has it happened that the selection has been justly or generously made I feel deeply indebted to Dr. Craven and the ladies of his family for a benevolence which had much to suppress, and nothing selfish to excite, it, and but for which my captivity would soon have ended in death. The letter from my little Polly is a sweet, graceful image of her honest, affectionate heart. I am sure she will be a comfort and honor to her family in after-years. Fortress Monroe, April 21, 1866. The young soldier who saw you in the cars at Binghamton reported the interview, and described how bright and wideawake little Winnie was. It was a great pleasure to me to hear an eye-witness. The weather is quite warm, the earth is clothed in her bright robes of promise, the birds sing joyously, and I will not, like th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
the characters I met, how to observe most keenly and guide myself; by which I was enabled, I think, to achieve a certain mastery of those infirmities which, I was only too conscious, had cropped up since I had entered the Army [i. e., during the Civil War]. And now, at last,--for Africa and Livingstone! Zanzibar is to be his starting-point; there is no direct communication from Bombay; so he must creep and zig-zag, by irregular sailing-ship. He starts, October 12, 1870, in the barque Polly, a six weeks voyage to Mauritius. Off again, in the brigantine Romp ; and, in seventeen days, to St. Anne's Island, Seychelles group. Thence, in the little brigantine whaler, Falcon, to creep along for nineteen days more. Still at sea, light breezes every day. Oh! how I suffer from ennui! Oh, torment of an impatient soul! What is the use of a sailing-boat in the tropics? My back aches with pain, my mind becomes old, and all because of these dispiriting calms. December 31st, 1870
Apr. 12, 1797. William was the son of Abijah Perry, b. in Princeton, Aug. 3, 1764,--son of Aaron Perry, b. in Mendon, Apr. 17, 1733. The father of Aaron was John P., who is supposed to be a descendant of Edmund Perry, who settled in N. E. about 1650. Sanford B. Perry m. Sarah Jane Barr, b. of James Barr, in New Ipswich, July 11, 1827. Her father was b. May 23, 1790; and his father, James, b. in Kilbarchan, co. of Renfrew, Dec. 12, 1752, emigrated to the United States, June 22, 1774.  1POLLY, Samuel, and Elizabeth, had--  1-2Samuel, b. Nov. 3, 1714.  3Elizabeth, b. May 13, 1716.  4Ruth, b. Feb. 25, 1718.  5John, b. Aug. 6, 1719; d. Mar. 15, 1721.  6Susanna, b. 1721; d. Apr. 16, 1721.  7Sarah, b. Mar. 7, 1729.  1Porter, John (1), was of Windsor, Ct., in 1638; will proved, June, 1649; and had--  1-2Samuel, m. Hannah Stanley; was one of the first settlers of Hadley, in 1659; and d. 1689, leaving seven children.  2-3Samuel Porter, son of the last, was b. Apr. 6, 1660;
Nov. 1846; Simeon, b. 20 Dec. 1786, d. 20 Mar. 1815; Polly, b. 23 Feb. 1790; Sukey, b. 9 Oct. 1791. Ephraim th8, d. 6 Aug. 1868; in Acton, ,John, b. 29 Dec. 1781; Polly. b. 4 Oct. 1783, m.——Hosley; in Pepperell, Lydia, b.1787, a merchant at East Cambridge, d. 14 Aug. 1865; Polly, b. 10 Ap. 1789, m. Benjamin O. Wellington 20 May 18. 1777); his chil. were Thankful, bap. 16 Ap. 1775; Polly, bap. 28 June 1778, m. Samuel Frost Wyman 10 Nov. 17field, 1639. Perhaps he was the freeman of 1640. Polly, George, fined for breach of a Town Order 1657. nney adds Zechariah, b. 1 Jan. and d. 21 Sept. 1784; Polly, b. 24 Nov. 1785, m. Abijah Pierce; Rebecca, b. 22 O778; John, b. 28 Dec. 1779; William, b. 8 Mar. 1782; Polly (Mary), bap. 29 Feb. 1784, m. Jason Howe 28 Nov. 180amuel (19), m. Mehetabel Cutter 7 Feb. 1781, and had Polly, bap. 9 Dec. 1781; Harriet, bap. 29 Oct. 1783, m. Sa, bap. 1 June 1783, m. Cyrus Holbrook 28 Sept. 1800; Polly (Mary), bap. 13 Feb. 1785, d. 18 Mar. 1792; Amos, ba
. 1803; John, b. 18 Oct. 1768, d. 24 May 1770; Elizabeth, b. 25 Feb. 1770; Sarah, b. 20 Feb. 1772; John, b. 19 May 1774; Mary, b. 26 Jan. 1777; Rebecca, b. 14 June 1779. Elizabeth the m. d. 8 April 1808, aged 62. 18. Ephraim, s. of Ephraim (16), m. Hannah Crosby (pub. 6 Dec.) 1777, and had Hannah, b. 25 Sept. 1778; Ephraim, b. 2 Mar. 1780; Isaac, b. 2 Oct. 1781, d. 12 Dec. 1815; Sally, b. 27 April 1783; Jazaniah, b 25 Feb. 1785, d. 27 Nov. 1846; Simeon, b. 20 Dec. 1786, d. 20 Mar. 1815; Polly, b. 23 Feb. 1790; Sukey, b. 9 Oct. 1791. Ephraim the f. resided in Menotomy, and d. 30 April 1824. 19. Ephraim, s. of Ephraim (18), m. Susan Wellington 18 Dec. 1803, and had Josiah W., b. 12 Nov. 1805; Susan W., b. 4 Mar. 1810; Micah W., b. 12 July 1812; John B., b. 14 Jan. 1816; Ann L. W., b. 22 Aug. 1818; Thomas D., b. 4 May 1821; Aaron S. W., b. 22 Aug. 1824; Harriet A., b. 16 Dec. 1827. Ephraim the f. resided on North Avenue, and d. 27 Jan. 1861; his w. Susan W. d. 22 Aug. 1858, age
, bap. 21 Feb. 1790. Henry the f. resided at the easterly corner of North Avenue and Cedar Street, and d. 23 Sept. 1815, a. 74, leaving only one surviving child, Mrs. Goddard. who inherited the homestead; his w. Mercy d. 4 Dec. 1815, a. 69 or 71. 11. Gilbert, s. of Edward (5), m. Martha——, and had in Pepperell, Hannah, b. 13 May 1773, m. Thomas Rundle of Boston 17 July 1810; Sally, b. 21 Feb. 1775. m. Joshua Shed; Patty, b. 9 Feb. 1778, d. 6 Aug. 1868; in Acton, ,John, b. 29 Dec. 1781; Polly. b. 4 Oct. 1783, m.——Hosley; in Pepperell, Lydia, b. 10 Sept. 1787; and in Camb., Nabby, b. 17 Sept. 1790, m. Walter Fisk. Gilbert the f. d. of lockjaw 15 Sept. 1818, a. 74; his w. Martha d. 28 June 1800, a. 50. 12. Isaiah, s. of Edward (5), m. Judae (Judith) Symmes of Woburn 15 May 1773, and had John Eliot, bap. 9 Feb. 1777, d. 1783; Judith, bap. 10 Nov. 1781, d. 1783. His w. Judith d. 1783, and he m. Sarah——, and had Edward (prob. the same who d. at Bedford 23 Mar. 1825, a. 33),
the f. res. in Lex. and d. 8 Feb. 1820, a. nearly 99; his w. Lydia d. 10 Nov. 1802, a. 71. 25. Samuel, s. of Samuel (24), m. Lydia Nelson of Lincoln 1 Oct. 1778, and had Lydia, b. 20 Feb. 1780, m. Nehemiah I. Ingraham of Boston; Samuel, b. 15 Dec. 1781, d.—Sept. 1798; Jonathan, b. 17 Aug. 1783; Dorcas, b. 27 June 1786, m. Rev. Daniel Marrett of Standish, Me., in 1810, and was mother of Lorenzo Marrett, Esq., of Camb.; Thomas, b. 22 May 1787, a merchant at East Cambridge, d. 14 Aug. 1865; Polly, b. 10 Ap. 1789, m. Benjamin O. Wellington 20 May 1811; Oliver, b. 16 May 1791, a retired merchant, now residing in Camb.; Hepzibah, b. 24 May 1793, m. Peter Wellington 24 May 1813; Harriet, b. 12 July 1795, m. Elias Smith 8 Aug. 1819; James, b. 5 Oct. 1797. Samuel the f. res. in Lincoln, near Lex., and d. 8 Jan. 1834; his w. Lydia d. 5 Ap. 1829, a. 71. 26. Edward, parentage not ascertained, had Lydia, b. about 1767, d. 24 Ap. 1804, a. 37; John, bap. 6 Jan. 1771, prob. d. 16 May 1804;
4. Stephen, s. of Stephen (3), m. Thankful Child of Wat. 16 June 1774, and Mary Bemis of Waltham (pub. 28 Feb. 1777); his chil. were Thankful, bap. 16 Ap. 1775; Polly, bap. 28 June 1778, m. Samuel Frost Wyman 10 Nov. 1796; Betsey, bap. 23 Ap. 1780, m. Chas. Walker of Fryeburg, Me.; Eunice, bap. 9 Dec. 1781 (this baptism is recor Cooper 2 Aug. 1664. She d. 8 May 1666, and he disappears. Place, Thomas, sold land adjoining the west-end field, 1639. Perhaps he was the freeman of 1640. Polly, George, fined for breach of a Town Order 1657. Post, Stephen (otherwise written Poast), owned a house and twelve acres on the south side of the river, 1635. eth, b. 19 Sept. 1780; Zechariah and Rebecca, twins, b. 17 Oct. and d. 27 and 28 Oct. 1782; to the foregoing Binney adds Zechariah, b. 1 Jan. and d. 21 Sept. 1784; Polly, b. 24 Nov. 1785, m. Abijah Pierce; Rebecca, b. 22 Oct. 1787, m. Ebenezer Warren; John, b. 12 Sept. 1789, m. Sarah Hall; Joseph, b. 27 May 1792, d. 19 Nov. 1795; B
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